How can I generate a random sample of unique vertex pairings from a undirected graph, with uniform probability?

I’m working on a research project where I have to pair up entities together and analyze outcomes. Normally, without constraints on how the entities can be paired, I could easily select one random entity pair, remove it from the pool, then randomly select the next entity pair.

That would be like creating a random sample of vertex pairs from a complete graph.

However, this time around the undirected graph is now

  • incomplete
  • with a possibility that the graph might be disconnected.

I thought about using the above method but realized that my sample would not have a uniform probability of being chosen, as probabilities of pairings are no longer independent of each other due to uneven vertex degrees.

I’m banging my head at the wall for this. It’s best for research that I generate a sample with uniform probability. Given that my graph has around n = 5000 vertices, is there an algorithm that i could use such that the resulting sample fulfils these conditions?

  1. There are no duplicates in the sample (all vertices in the graph only is paired once).
  2. The remaining vertices that are not in the sample do not have an edge with each other. (They are unpaired and cannot be paired)
  3. The sample generated that meets the above two criteria should have a uniform probability of being chosen as compared to any other sample that fulfils the above two points.

There appear to be some work done for bipartite graphs as seen on this stackoverflow discussion here. The algorithms described obtains a near-uniform sample but doesn’t seem to be able to apply to this case.