Looking For Historically Accurate Ordinary Items Database For Dungeon-Stocking


I swear I had found in the comments of one of Matthew Colville’s videos a link to an enormous database of accurate lists of ordinary items that list REAL items that could be found in any room, no matter when in time, or where in the world.
This would be very useful for stocking a dungeon realistically, and also for good set design in theatre period pieces.

I think these accurate lists were made because they’re useful for some anthropology or archaeological reasons, but I’m not sure.

I used to have a link bookmarked to an enormous database of accurate lists of ordinary items that list REAL items that could be found in any room, no matter when in time, or where in the world, such as the objects in a 1700’s tepee in North America, or the ordinary stuff at an early roman estate, or whatever would be in a 1920’s gymnasium. Seriously, anywhere, anytime accurate lists, it was an amazing database.

This would be very useful for stocking a dungeon realistically, and also for good set design in theatre period pieces.

But for the life of me, I can’t find it again!
All of the search term combinations I can think of don’t bring it up.
Estate Inventory of dead people, For legal end-of-life property transfer law And rental-fire-flood-earthquake insurance survey of households

The data may have come from the insurance industry; lists of personal property itemized just in case a future claim would need to be made against an insurance policy, renter’s insurance, and the like.

I don’t want an ordinary random item generator, those are easy to find and they don’t provide the depth of realism for setting-the-stage that I’m looking for.

I’m specifically looking for this particular database because it has REAL and COMPLETE lists of each & every single last mundane item that were actually in such places at those times, and this isn’t the kind of detail a GM can generate from their own mind and definitely not from somebody’s random table with even 100 things on it, which sounds like a lot but isn’t. I want to use it for set design in all kinds of art, not just RPGs.

The database had such minor details as how many sticks of gum were left in a pack, how many individual socks were present, how many forks, knives, and egg slicers were in this one drawer in a kitchen, how many screws were in the workshop cabinet, etc.

I asked in another forum, and somebody mentioned that it might have something to do with "Household Survey", and I suspect now that the database might have been a real-world tool for tracking wealth or poverty across time & space? I’ve searched some more based on that, but I still can’t find it.

Maybe you have a link to something like this?