MySQL password rotation: Using a single user to change other user passwords


I’m currently working on setting up a password rotation strategy for an AWS Aurora/MySQL based application.

My plan was to use a strategy like this…

  • Application usernames/passwords stored in AWS SSM encrypted parameters.
  • Application servers have access to retrieve only their credentials from SSM. Restricted by environment (staging, production etc.)
  • Lambda configured to run periodically to change passwords in MySQL and store the new values in SSM. Lambda to authenticate with the database using AWS IAM roles, rather than using a password.

The last bit is the bit I’m not sure about. This configuration would require the lambda role/user to have permission to change the passwords for all of the other application users.

Is this a reasonable way to do it, from a security perspective? Since the lambda mysql user will use an IAM role rather than a password, this should retrict it’s use to only authorised roles.

The alternative would be to not have a special db user for the lambda to login, but rather to have the lambda function retreive each users credentials from SSM, and then login as each user to change it’s password.

Either way the lambda is going to need to have access to each user.

Assuming I can carefully retrieve access to the "lambda_user" in MySQL, are there any other glaring issues with having a user have authority to change other users passwords?

Also, just to clarify, these are application users, not regular human type users who will be using these credentials.