Denying (NPC) divine casters the ability to regain spells

I am playing an epic D&D 3.5e PC in a medium-optimization (for an epic 3.5e, as I understand it, at least) game:

  • Most regular spells are available to the party (modulo those labeled Evil), although Wish/Miracle are significantly nontrivial in cost
  • Magic item creation isn’t something that can be relied on beyond scribing scrolls
  • Epic spells are seriously limited (I suspect most high-optimization epic casting is off-limits due to achievable spell DCs being limited to the sub-100 range after party spell slot contributions modify the DC, and even some basic epic spells like the SRD’s Soul Scry are a no-go)

My character (don’t ask me how) and their party, consist of:

  • My char: arcane gish, basically (the precise build details aren’t terribly important)
  • Party member A: another arcane gish (lower level than my char but not by too much)
  • Party member B: sneaky archer cleric (epic caster, but in the low epics)
  • Party member C: another cleric (capable of 9th circle casting, but not into epics yet)
  • Party member D: an epic FS (again, low epics AFAIK)
  • Party Member E: a rangerish / roguish sort

We are up against a problem in the form of a band of hostile NPC Lolthite priests that are going to need significant "softening up" done to them before we can carry out much else, operationally speaking. Considering that simply going in and being stabby isn’t really an option (again, don’t ask me how we know this), what approaches are there to preventing the NPC spellcasters from regaining spells over an extended period of time (a tenday or more in the in-character timeline)?

So far, using Daylight cast repeatedly through Eye of Power and direct castings of Symphonic Nightmare have come up from my research, but I would like to know if there are other options out there that I haven’t seen, especially ones that’d be more optimal (harder for divine casters to enact countermeasures against and / or requiring less invested effort) for long-term targeting of divine casters.

Does this magic item require that you already have the ability to use the feature that it modifies?

Last night the party was adventuring in Curse of Strahd.
In the previous session they had acquired the module-specific magic item

This item can be attuned to by a good creature. In last night’s session an NPC was able to attune to the item, unlocking its powers (emphasis mine):

Augury. You can use an action to cast an augury spell from the icon, with no material components required. Once used, this property can’t be used again until the next dawn.

Bane of the Undead. You can use the icon as a holy symbol while using the Turn Undead or Turn the Unholy feature. If you do so, increase the save DC by 2.

Cure Wounds. While holding the icon, you can take an action to heal one creature that you can see within 30 feet of you. The target regains 3d8 + 3 hit points, unless it is an undead, a construct, or a fiend. Once used, this property can’t be used again until the next dawn.

If I am reading this item correctly, anyone that can take an action can use Augury or Cure Wounds feature. The power is written in the format, ‘if you have an action, you use the action and the item grants you this ability’, even if you could not previously cast an augury or cure wounds, or even if you did not have Spellcasting ability.

However, it appears to me that what is granted by the Bane of the Undead feature is not the ability to Turn Undead, but rather a modification of that ability (+2 DC, use this as a holy symbol), to creatures that already have that feature. That is, in this sense "can use" and "can take" are granting you the ability, but "while using" requires that you already have the ability to do so. (This was important since the NPC in question did not inherently have the Turn Undead feature).

Am I interpreting this language correctly?

A good answer will show a similar example in a less ambiguous case. While this question is specifically about the 5e Curse of Strahd, I am open to an answer showing how that particular item ‘is supposed to work’ in a previous version of the module.

What happens to Ability Score changes when shapeshifted?

A low strength druid has been hit twice by a Shadow’s Strength Drain ability, reducing their strength score from 9 to 3. Fearing potential instant death, the Druid uses Wild Shape to turn into a Brown Bear, changing there physical ability scores to match that of the Brown Bear, which would normally mean their strength is now 19. What happens to the reduction to strength score? The only official information on this matter comes from Sage Advise:

Can a creature under the effects of polymorph have other spell effects on them, or are those game statistics also replaced by the those of the beast form? Polymorph replaces only the target’s character sheet or stat block with the stat block of the chosen form. Other effects, such as other spells, still exist.

However this only covers what could happen if a creature already polymorphed has an effect placed on them. In this instance, would the Druid in Brown Bear form have 19, 13, 3, or something else as its strength score? Would the result be the same for Polymorph, or other shape changing abilities that take the new forms statistics?

How should a player and GM handle an ability that necessitates a player seeing a GM’s roll?

A Dual-Cursed Oracle gets the following Revelation at 1st level:

Misfortune (Ex): At 1st level, as an immediate action, you can force a creature within 30 feet to reroll any one d20 roll that it has just made before the results of the roll are revealed. The creature must take the result of the reroll, even if it’s worse than the original roll. Once a creature has suffered from your misfortune, it cannot be the target of this revelation again for 1 day.

This can be used against any creature, including those the GM controls; indeed, that appears to be the intent of the ability, hence the name Misfortune. The problem is that in order for it to work on said creatures, the player needs to see the GM’s die roll, which to my knowledge is generally frowned upon, and see it whenever any enemy makes any save since Misfortune can potentially be activated at any time. Is there a better way to handle this?

Similar abilities include a Fate Cleric’s Tugging Strands, and a Nornkith’s Fate Weaver.

Does making an ability check take an action?

The only ability checks that are listed as an action in the game are Dexterity (Stealth) when taking the Hide action, and Wisdom (Perception) or Intelligence (Investigation) for the Search action. Do any other ability checks require an action?

My fighter was chasing a floating target, and needed to climb up a short but steep cliff. The climb and horizontal run to the target were within his movement for the turn, but the DM had me roll a Strength (Athletics) check to complete the climb. I was successful, but after arriving at the top and attempting to grapple my target, the DM declared that I had already completed a skill check, which was an action. I was still able to grab the target using Action Surge, however I still felt slighted, as I thought the climb shouldn’t have taken an action.

Who was right here? what if the ability check was an Intelligence (Arcana) check to recall some information, should that still require an action as well?

When do Druids gain the ability to cast each spell level?

I understand spells and that spell levels don’t correspond with character level but on this website it says:

Spell level and character level don’t correspond directly. Typically, a character has to be at least 17th level, not 9th level, to cast a 9th–level spell.

I understand this, but what character level is a Druid required to be to cast a spell at any given spell level?

Just to be clear, I am not asking about spell slots here.

What would be the ramifications of allowing a Wild Magic Sorcerer’s Bend Luck ability to scale with level?

I was wondering why a Wild Magic Sorcerer’s Bend Luck ability is always 2 sorcery points and a reaction to increase or reduce another creature’s attack roll, ability check or saving throw by 1d4.

I think it’s pretty wild (pun intended) that is does not scale with levels considering there’s another spellcaster class, Bards, that have a very similar ability with Bardic Inspiration.

Bardic Inspiration affects the same types of rolls (attack rolls, ability checks and saving throws), does not use a reaction (uses a bonus action instead) and players can hold onto their bardic inspiration for a moment of their choosing. Furthermore, Bardic Inspirations are their own unique resource (equal to Charisma modifier, minimum of 1) and best of all they scale with levels (starting as d6’s and ending as d12’s at level 15). After reaching 5th level, Font of Inspiration allows Bards to regain all their Bardic Inspirations after a short rest.

In comparison, Bend Luck is pretty pitiful.

  1. It costs 2 sorcery points (equivalent of a level 1 spell slot and also the resource required for using metamagic, basically the best part of being a Sorcerer).
  2. It is always a flat 1d4. The chance of a 1d4 being impactful diminishes as you level up & enemies get stronger.
  3. It uses your reaction, which can be super valuable for casting Shield, Counterspell, Featherfall etc.

The only real benefit I can see is that it can be used offensively, whereas Bardic Inspiration cannot.

My questions:

  1. Am I missing something? Have I accurately portrayed the usefulness of Bend Luck?
  2. If I’m not missing anything, is it reasonable to have Bend Luck scale with levels? (At 6th level, it becomes a 1d6, 11th level 1d8, 16th level 1d10, for example?)

is it possible to get an ability score of 30 or more an any way? how?

I have noticed spellcasters ability to get bonus spells from having a high ability score depending on class (wisdom for clerics and paladins, intellgence for wizards, charisma for bards and sorcerers, I forgot about druids and rangers). Well, what I want to know is, is there a way for someone to get one of their scores up to 30? That includes temporary affects such as spells (ones that aren’t permanent, but ones that are count too of course) and items of any type that could raise that one score. If you can find a away for any of them, that works, but it would be great for someone to find a way to do so for all three (I do know that the solutions would be similar, but different for each score). If you can’t find a way for those scores to get up to 30 but you do have one for strength, dexterity, or constitution, that work too.

Component-based ability system for turn-based rpg

I am trying to make a component-based ability system for my new turn based game i am working on. I not sure with the architecture and the approch i am following.

So here my idea:

Every Ability is a Prefab. 4 Ability Prefabs will be attached to every Character, those are their abilitys.

An Ability consists of an AbilityController.cs. This will have the name and some basic data for the ability. Then i will attach one or more AbilityTargetMode.cs. Here i can pick a target mode (enemySingle,enemyAll,enemyRandom,AllySelf,…) and attach one or more AbilityComponent.cs to every AbilityTargetMode. AbilityComponents are "Do Damage","Apply Poison" and so on.

The idea behind this is that i can build complex abilitys:

Do Damage to a random enemy and poison him, then heal self, then apply buff to all allys.

The structure for an ability would be:

-- Controller ---- TargetMode: EnemySingle ------ Component 1: Damage ------ Component 2: Poison ---- TargetMode: Self ------ Component 1: Heal ---- TargetMode: AlliesAll ------ Component 1 : Buff 

And so on..

But im not sure about the whole system. Is it something that sounds right? Should i overthink something? And another problem that i have is that i do not know how to attach my Components and my target mode to my Controller/Prefab. Is it better to use scriptable objects? What are your thoughts on the system.