question about big cat and thier “standard attack” animal companion

IM playing pathfinder with my friends and IM playing a hunter (ranged build) and I have an animal companion a Big Cat we are currently level 5, and we started at level 4 and IM going to ask something that is troublesome.

How does a "standard attack works?"

Let’s say I move 10 yards and then i want to attack an enemy:

Can I attack with bite and claws?

Only bite?

Only claws?

Do I need to do full round attack to get all 3 attacks?

is there a way to get all attacks in a round?

Any good insight about this and any future tips for big cats?

thanks alot guys!

Can True Strike give me specific information about my target’s defenses? [duplicate]

The True Strike cantrip provides:

You point a finger at a target in range. Your magic grants you a brief insight into the target’s defenses. On your next turn, you gain advantage on your first attack roll against the target, provided that this spell hasn’t ended.

There’s another thread on this site discussing the cases in which casting this spell might make sense. Implicit in these arguments seems to be the idea that the "brief insight" granted by the spell is not useful in itself. It occurred to me that such insight could be useful in itself if it granted knowledge of specific details that might be useful for higher-order tactical or strategic planning outside of just getting Advantage on the next turn.

Does the brief insight granted by True Strike provide access to specific details about the target’s defenses, or is the language simply an explanation of how the player gains Advantage? An example could be where I don’t particularly need to gain Advantage on my next roll, but I want to know whether that bandit over there is concealing any weapons or wands underneath his cloak.

If the first case is true, a DM might report,

Ok, you cast True Strike at the cloaked bandit. He has knives hidden in each of his boots, and is carrying two wands of Fireball and one of Magic Missile in the sack over his shoulder. The walking stick he is carrying conceals a three-foot double-edged sword. He is resistant to lightning damage though a spell that seems to have been cast on him, but you would need a more powerful spell than True Strike to identify the exact spell or source. If you still have concentration at the start of your next turn, you will have Advantage in attacking.

What do I do about PCs using Con damage to “nuke” bosses?

So recently my players realized that they can spam poison-based Con damage on my bosses to effectively nuke them down in a couple rounds. This is basically ruining the challenge of my fights, but they seem to love it. I’m not sure how to handle this without basically saying “No, you can’t do that.” Or making the bosses suddenly immune for some reason. Their entire tactics rely on lowering the enemies saves, then spamming Con Damage to lower it more, which allows easier Con Damage spam, until it’s dead by round three.

I don’t know how to handle this. I don’t want to be an ass and just start doing it back in a “Well fine, if you do ima do it too” fashion.

This sucks…

What language would be appropriate for texts to be written in about Thor (Forgotten Realms)?

In our LMoP campaign, there is a Cleric whose deity is Thor. He has come across several texts that discuss Thor (myths and religious texts).

What language would those texts most likely be written in?

(I don’t know if this is helpful context, but he is a Wood Elf).

Would Illuski (Nordic) languages be appropriate here?

What can I do about the guys being distracted by a new girl in D&D group?

We recently got a new party member, and she is … well, extremely distracting if you catch my drift. As the DM it is frustrating, because all the guys are trying to flirt with her, and shower her with items in game. The whole thing is quickly becoming a mess. (One even attempted to grope her, In the game and real life, an issue being addressed in a separate question) Seriously, I have no freaking idea what to say to the guys, and how to do it, the whole thing just seems so … awkward. Not only that, but I too have found myself attracted to her. How do I get my own, and my group’s hormones to be put away so we can play the game and have fun; which is what I’m sure she is trying to do also. We are a bunch of 8th and 9th graders and we are all friends.

Can someone help me?

What do official sources say about player access to the Monster Manual?

The Introduction of the Monster Manual makes it clear several times that it is a book for DMs (MM, p. 4; emphasis mine):

This bestiary is for storytellers and world-builders. If you have ever thought about running a DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game for your friends, either a single night’s adventure or a long-running campaign, this tome contains page after page of inspiration.** […]

If you’re an experienced Dungeon Master (DM)**, a few of the monster write-ups might surprise you, for we’ve gone into the Monster Manuals of yore and discovered some long-lost factoids. […]

The best thing about being a DM is that you get to invent your own fantasy world and bring it to life, and nothing brings a D&D world to life more than the creatures that inhabit it. […]

The Monster Manual is one of three books that form the foundation of the DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game, the other two being the Player’s Handbook and the Dungeon Master’s Guide. The Monster Manual, like the Dungeon Master’s Guide, is a book for DMs.

However, it stops short of saying the Monster Manual is only for DMs, and does not specifically say that it should not be used by players.


Roll20, on the other hand, clearly made a decision to give players extensive access to information from the Monster Manual. Per the Roll20 wiki page for the Monster Manual:

Players can have direct access to the Monster Manual within the In-App Roll20 Compendium. You can share the Monster Manual with Compendium Sharing.


This is not a question about whether such information should be available to players – that is opinion-based and off-topic.

Rather, I am trying to understand:

  1. Besides the statements in the MM itself, what do other official sources say about to what extent the information players have access to the information in the MM?

  2. Did Roll20 ever explain their decision to provide players with full access to MM information?

While this is a list question, it is a bounded list – I am interested in official sources, and officially licensed sources.

It is not a ‘designer’s intent’ question in that I am not interested in opinion, interpretation, or speculation; I am just trying to track down relevant textual quotes about who has legitimate access to the MM information, and under what circumstances.

How one would go about making their own YouTube video recommendation engine? [closed]

I’m looking into the possibility of creating a website that would serve as an alternative to YouTube’s video recommendations, attempting to recreate the old experience of getting lost in YouTube before the algorithm drastically changed and became what it is today.

What are the hurdles that one has to go through when building such a project? How would one pull the necessary information to use? What is the common approach when building recommendation engines? Is it even allowed by Google?

Self-research was already done, yet no sufficient answers were found.

What is so great about Anyspell?

I have seen it rated gold in many guides, but no reasoning was provided.

Sure, you can cast Invisibility or Glitterdust now, but it is once per day, using a 3rd level slot, and you need to have access to the spell in written form.
This does seem nice, but too little to matter.

Is there something I am missing? Can a Cleric activate a wand if the spell is in his head with Anyspell for example?

Does D&D 5e have a rule for character knowledge about monsters?

In the 3rd and 4th editions of D&D, there were explicit rules for determining if a character knew anything about a monster before them. In 3rd edition, for example, use of the Knowledge skill with a general DC of 10 + the monster’s HD allowed for determining one fact, plus one fact per 5 points over the check.

Looking at the Intelligence section of the 5e PHB, I don’t see any similar notation. Does 5e provide any guidance as to when a player could use their out-of-game knowledge about a monster, or when the player might be told things their character would probably know in-game?

How much do I tell new players about new monsters?


Background

I am a brand-new DM, about to lead a game for brand-new players. I have a lot of knowledge of rules from playing Baldur’s Gate and Neverwinter Nights over and over, leafing through a friend’s books, and finally buying the three basic books for myself.

Question

How much information should I give to my players about monsters they encounter?

Should I essentially read the entire MM entry to them, or let them figure out how the enemies operate through experience, or (as I assume), something in the middle? Keep in mind, only one of them has even peripheral experience with D&D (they are very good sports for giving it a shot!), so they won’t be bringing background knowledge to the table. For example, do DMs generally let players know what immunities creatures have, or do they let them figure it out by trial and error? What about offensive abilities? For example, if a player has a potion of fire resistance, should I give them a heads-up about the fact that the chimera they’re facing has a fire breath attack?