How to add additional field

If a user want to add. For example I have 3 fields (Brother Name, Marital Status, Occupation) . There should be a button + or – , when click the same 3 fields (Brother Name, Marital Status, Occupation) should be added below the 1st. Im creating form in forminator, Any other option in forminator or other plugin option plz suggestion. Thanks

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Additional css urls changed from S3 links to live site links when downloaded the site for local development

So, I have a website with the Hueman theme. It’s all working properly on the live domain name but I needed to make some changes so I downloaded the whole website (files and database) on my local computer to make the changes and publish them on the live site.

What happened is extremely intriguing, at least to me. The header has a large background image done through css from Appearance > Customize > Advanced Options > Additional CSS and that image on the live site is an Amazon S3 link (all my media files go there) but when I set up the site locally the link in the "Additional CSS" changed to point to WordPress’ uploads directory on the live site and obviously that’s a 404 error.

The plugin which handles my S3 upload is "WP Offload Media Lite" and I have the "Amazon Web Services" plugin as well.

Here is my live site additional css:

/* You can add your own CSS here.  Click the help icon above to learn more.  Use this field to test small chunks of CSS code. For important CSS customizations, it is recommended to modify the style.css file of a child theme. http//codex.wordpress.org/Child_Themes */  /*@import url('https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Kalam&display=swap'); */ html {     max-width: 100%;     overflow-x: hidden; }  #header {     background: url(https://imagecurve.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/21134758/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1920x650-1.jpg) center 0px no-repeat; }  nav#nav-header {     background: #33363b !important;     opacity: 0.9; }  #nav-header.nav-container {     box-shadow: none;     -webkit-box-shadow: none; }  #nav-header li a {     font-weight: bold; }  #header .pad {     max-width: 480px;     margin: 80px auto;     background: rgb(68, 68, 68);     opacity: 0.8;     padding: 30px 30px 20px;     padding-top: 28px;     padding-bottom: 30px;     text-align: center; }  #header .site-title, #header .site-description {     float: none; }  #header .site-description {     font-size: 17px;     color: rgb(255, 255, 255);     font-weight: 500;     text-align: center;     line-height: 40px;     padding: 0;     font-style: normal;     margin-left: 0; }  /* Subscribe form */ .widgetGuts .success {     background: #01c01e; }  .widgetGuts .subscribeButton {     background: #3b8dbd;     color: #fff;     padding: 8px 14px;     font-weight: 600;     display: inline-block;     border: none;     cursor: pointer;     -webkit-border-radius: 3px;     border-radius: 26px; }  #frm-subscriptionFrontsimplesubscribe-2 dl dt:first-child {     margin-bottom: 5px; }  #simplesubscribe-2 > h3 {     font-size: 20px; }  .post-meta .post-date {     display: none; }  /* Contact forms */ .wpcf7-form span.wpcf7-not-valid-tip {     position: static;     display: inline-block;     width: 100%;     margin-top: 8px; }  .wpcf7-form input[type=text], .wpcf7-form input[type=email] {     width: 100%; }  .wpcf7-submit {     border-radius: 26px !important; }  .nf-form-cont .submit-wrap input {     background: #3b8dbd;     color: #fff;     padding: 8px 14px;     font-weight: 600;     display: inline-block;     border: none;     cursor: pointer;     -webkit-border-radius: 3px;     border-radius: 3px; }  article.post-26078 > .post-inner, article.post-28116 > .entry {     max-width: 800px; }  #frm-subscriptionFrontsimplesubscribe-2 #frm-email {     width: 100%;     padding: 6px 8px;     box-sizing: border-box;     border-radius: 3px;     border: 1px solid #c7c7c7; }  #header-widgets {     float: none; }  #header-widgets p {     margin-bottom: 0; }  .ap-form-field .wp-switch-editor {     height: 25px; }  .social-links li:nth-child(3), .social-links li:nth-child(5) {     display: none; }  #header .site-description {     font-size: 22px !important; }  #explore-legends {       background: #dff3d5;     border: 2px solid #82b965;     padding: 65px 0 25px 0;     text-align: center;     margin-bottom: 20px;     border-radius: 18px; }  #explore-legends h3 {     color: #8a8989;     margin-bottom: 0;     font-family: 'Kalam', cursive; }  #explore-legends a {         background: #82b965;     display: inline-block;     padding: 7px 12px;     text-align: center;     color: white;     clear: right;     margin: 12px 0 35px 0;     border-radius: 13px;     width: 100%;     max-width: 165px;     box-sizing: border-box;     font-weight: bold; }  #explore-legends i {     font-style: italic;     color: #5d5d5d; }  @media(max-width: 1200px) {     #header-widgets {         margin-top: 5px;         display: block !important;     } }  @media(max-width: 1280px) {     #header {         background: url(https://imagecurve.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/21134754/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1280x500-1.jpg) center 0px no-repeat;     } }  @media(max-width: 1024px) {     #header {         background: url(https://imagecurve.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/06051411/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1024x420-2.jpg) center 0px no-repeat;     } }  @media (max-width: 785px) and (min-width: 720px) {     #nav-header li:nth-last-child(2) {         display: none;     } }  @media(min-width: 720px) {     #nav-header li:last-child {         float: right;     }      #nav-header li:nth-last-child(2) {         float: right;     } }  @media (max-width: 720px) {     #header .container .group.pad {         max-width: 252px;     }      #header .site-title {         padding: 0;     } }  @media (max-width: 580px) {     .wp-pagenavi span.extend {         display: block;     } }  @media (max-width: 480px) {     #header .container .group.pad {         margin: 50px auto;     }      #header {         background: url(https://imagecurve.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/06051527/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-480x520-2.jpg) center center no-repeat;     } } 

Here is my local additional css:

/* You can add your own CSS here.  Click the help icon above to learn more.  Use this field to test small chunks of CSS code. For important CSS customizations, it is recommended to modify the style.css file of a child theme. http//codex.wordpress.org/Child_Themes */  /*@import url('https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Kalam&display=swap'); */ html {     max-width: 100%;     overflow-x: hidden; }  #header {     background: url(https://www.imagecurve.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/21134758/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1920x650-1.jpg) center 0px no-repeat; }  nav#nav-header {     background: #33363b !important;     opacity: 0.9; }  #nav-header.nav-container {     box-shadow: none;     -webkit-box-shadow: none; }  #nav-header li a {     font-weight: bold; }  #header .pad {     max-width: 480px;     margin: 80px auto;     background: rgb(68, 68, 68);     opacity: 0.8;     padding: 30px 30px 20px;     padding-top: 28px;     padding-bottom: 30px;     text-align: center; }  #header .site-title, #header .site-description {     float: none; }  #header .site-description {     font-size: 17px;     color: rgb(255, 255, 255);     font-weight: 500;     text-align: center;     line-height: 40px;     padding: 0;     font-style: normal;     margin-left: 0; }  /* Subscribe form */ .widgetGuts .success {     background: #01c01e; }  .widgetGuts .subscribeButton {     background: #3b8dbd;     color: #fff;     padding: 8px 14px;     font-weight: 600;     display: inline-block;     border: none;     cursor: pointer;     -webkit-border-radius: 3px;     border-radius: 26px; }  #frm-subscriptionFrontsimplesubscribe-2 dl dt:first-child {     margin-bottom: 5px; }  #simplesubscribe-2 > h3 {     font-size: 20px; }  .post-meta .post-date {     display: none; }  /* Contact forms */ .wpcf7-form span.wpcf7-not-valid-tip {     position: static;     display: inline-block;     width: 100%;     margin-top: 8px; }  .wpcf7-form input[type=text], .wpcf7-form input[type=email] {     width: 100%; }  .wpcf7-submit {     border-radius: 26px !important; }  .nf-form-cont .submit-wrap input {     background: #3b8dbd;     color: #fff;     padding: 8px 14px;     font-weight: 600;     display: inline-block;     border: none;     cursor: pointer;     -webkit-border-radius: 3px;     border-radius: 3px; }  article.post-26078 > .post-inner, article.post-28116 > .entry {     max-width: 800px; }  #frm-subscriptionFrontsimplesubscribe-2 #frm-email {     width: 100%;     padding: 6px 8px;     box-sizing: border-box;     border-radius: 3px;     border: 1px solid #c7c7c7; }  #header-widgets {     float: none; }  #header-widgets p {     margin-bottom: 0; }  .ap-form-field .wp-switch-editor {     height: 25px; }  .social-links li:nth-child(3), .social-links li:nth-child(5) {     display: none; }  #header .site-description {     font-size: 22px !important; }  #explore-legends {       background: #dff3d5;     border: 2px solid #82b965;     padding: 65px 0 25px 0;     text-align: center;     margin-bottom: 20px;     border-radius: 18px; }  #explore-legends h3 {     color: #8a8989;     margin-bottom: 0;     font-family: 'Kalam', cursive; }  #explore-legends a {         background: #82b965;     display: inline-block;     padding: 7px 12px;     text-align: center;     color: white;     clear: right;     margin: 12px 0 35px 0;     border-radius: 13px;     width: 100%;     max-width: 165px;     box-sizing: border-box;     font-weight: bold; }  #explore-legends i {     font-style: italic;     color: #5d5d5d; }  @media(max-width: 1200px) {     #header-widgets {         margin-top: 5px;         display: block !important;     } }  @media(max-width: 1280px) {     #header {         background: url(https://www.imagecurve.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1280x500-1.jpg) center 0px no-repeat;     } }  @media(max-width: 1024px) {     #header {         background: url(https://www.imagecurve.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-1024x420-2.jpg) center 0px no-repeat;     } }  @media (max-width: 785px) and (min-width: 720px) {     #nav-header li:nth-last-child(2) {         display: none;     } }  @media(min-width: 720px) {     #nav-header li:last-child {         float: right;     }      #nav-header li:nth-last-child(2) {         float: right;     } }  @media (max-width: 720px) {     #header .container .group.pad {         max-width: 252px;     }      #header .site-title {         padding: 0;     } }  @media (max-width: 580px) {     .wp-pagenavi span.extend {         display: block;     } }  @media (max-width: 480px) {     #header .container .group.pad {         margin: 50px auto;     }      #header {         background: url(https://www.imagecurve.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Book-on-a-pebble-beach-propped-open-with-a-stone-hero-480x520-2.jpg) center center no-repeat;     } } 

The live site is here.

I tried googling but nothing sensible was found. I am confused, how could this happen?

Is Additional Fighting Style underpowered as the only class feature at a given level?

This question is inspired by considering minor homebrew improvements to the Champion subclass, which is frequently but not universally considered a weak subclass.

Looking at the class features, the following occurred to me about Additional Fighting Style (level 10):

  1. Most fighting styles don’t synergize. The main exception is taking both a defensive and offensive fighting style, leading to common recommendations of Defense as the go-to choice for level 10 Champions.
  2. Every class that gets a first fighting style gets additional features at that level (e.g. Spellcasting for level 2 Paladins and Rangers).

So Additional Fighting Style by itself seems pretty weak compared to the level 10 features of other fighter subclasses. Hence the question.

How does additional damage work with the Hand Mortar’s explosive property?

So I am building a gunslinger, and see a possible very high risk, but very high reward tactic for large groups.

Say I have a hand mortar, and fire it into a creature surrounded by at least 2 others. The hand mortar has the explosive property

Explosive. Upon a hit, everything within 5 ft of the target must make a Dexterity saving throw (DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Dexterity modifier) or suffer 1d8 fire damage. If the weapon misses, the ammunition fails to detonate, or bounces away harmlessly before doing so.

Now say I choose to spend 2 grit points on the Violent Shot trick shot.

When you make a firearm attack against a creature, you can expend one or more grit points to enhance the volatility of the attack. For each grit point expended, the attack gains a +2 to the firearm’s misfire score. If the attack hits, you can roll one additional weapon damage die per grit point spent when determining the damage.

Does this mean that if I hit and do not misfire (roll above a 7, and above the main target’s AC) I deal 6d8 + DEX fire damage to the main target AND a potential 3d8 fire damage to the creature around the target, or does the "splash damage" not count as weapon damage?

This is entirely based on the DnD beyond Gunslinger subclass definition.

Instead of rolling for every creature hit by a spell, can we reasonably use a single additional die for the number of hits?

I will preface this question by stating that the hypothetical situation proposed below will obviously only work as long you have a die with a number of faces equal to the number of enemies.

Scenario

Suppose we have a party of PCs and they encounter 8 identical hostile enemies. Once of the PCs is a wizard, and decides to cast Fireball in such a way that it will hit all 8 enemies at once. Since we don’t roll to-hit with Fireball, all the enemies just make a Dexterity saving throw. These rolls would normally be rolled for each discrete enemy for a total of 8 individual rolls.

Question

Would it be entirely unfair to roll a single d20 and a single d8, and if the d20 roll succeeds on the Dex save, rule that the 1d8 roll is the number of enemies take half (or full) damage, and the rest take full (or half) damage? Conversely, if the Dex save fails, all enemies take full damage.

Thoughts

I’m considering an approach to speeding up dice rolls for large packs of enemies, but I can’t really tell outright if the above scenario is unfair. My first impression is that it might skew based on saves or AC (if we’re rolling to-hit instead of for saves) and number of enemies.

For the example let us consider two sets of outcomes: one for a pack of Kobolds, and one for a group of Bandits.

I know this all essentially boils down to dice math, but I’m not the greatest at it and would appreciate the help evaluating whether this is fair, and what the reasonable thresholds are.

Why brass knuckles do 0 additional damage in Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition?

I’ve been creating a character and thought that it was cool for her to have brass knuckles to fight, but then I’ve seen that in the Core book (pg. 180) says that brass knuckles deal 0 damage (appart from the damage that you deal with raw brawl. In the Chronicles of Darkness 2nd Edition core book says the same.

Is this an errata, or there’s something I’m missing?

Does a Divine Soul Sorcerer have access to the additional cleric spells in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything?

Additional Cleric Spells

1st-level cleric feature

The spells in the following list expand the cleric spell list in the Player’s Handbook. The list is organized by spell level, not character level.

Divine Magic

When your Spellcasting feature lets you learn or replace a sorcerer cantrip or a sorcerer spell of 1st level or higher, you can choose the new spell from the cleric spell list or the sorcerer spell list. You must otherwise obey all the restrictions for selecting the spell, and it becomes a sorcerer spell for you.

Do the additional spells count as being on the Cleric’s spell list for the purposes of Divine Magic as long as both supplements are agreed to be used?

Does the second attack from the Dual Wielder feat require an additional action, or a bonus action, to carry out?

I am looking at taking the Dual Wielder feat (PHB, p. 165), but I am not entirely sure as to how it works specifically. It includes the following benefit, among others:

You can use two-weapon fighting even when the one-handed melee weapons you are wielding aren’t light.

Does this second weapon attack require an additional action, or a bonus action, to carry out?

Do Grave Domain clerics get the additional Spare the Dying benefits if they already know the spell?

The Grave Domain Cleric learns the spare the dying cantrip at level 1 via the class feature Circle of Mortality, which also gives them extra benefits relating to it. Part of the description of the feature says (XGtE, pg. 20):

… In addition, you learn the spare the dying cantrip, which doesn’t count against the number of cleric cantrips you know. For you, it has a range of 30 feet, and you can cast it as a bonus action.

However, what if I multiclass into cleric and I already have the spare the dying cantrip (e.g. via having taken Magic Initiate before now or, in my case, via originally being a Warlock with the Undying patron, which also grants this cantrip at level 1)?

Similar bonus cantrips usually have wording more like the Light Domain Cleric (PHB, pg. 61):

When you choose this domain at 1st level, you gain the light cantrip if you don’t already know it.

The Circle of Mortality class feature doesn’t say something like “if you don’t already know it”. Thus, if I already have the cantrip, do the extra benefits still count (i.e. increased range and option to cast it as a bonus action) since this class feature was not the one to grant me this cantrip in the first place?