How are clockwork prosthetics and necrografts affected by effects that cause magic items to stop working?

Clockwork prosthetics and necrograft arms and legs are the rare examples of magic items to fully replace humanoid limbs, and unless they have a special ruleset on the matter they are as susceptible to antimagic fields or disjunction spells as any other magic item.

For any other magic item, it’s easy to predict what happens when they get affected by an effect that suppresses their magic : magic weapons revert to mundane masterwork weapons and other magic items stop having any effect and are totally useless. However, there are no rules about losing limbs except for some rules added by 3rd party publishers (that I tend to avoid except for a few rare exceptions) or I probably missed them, and the rules on prosthetics don’t explain what happens either.

If a magic prosthesis gets its magic suppressed does it :

  • totally stop working altogether and become inert (and apart from obvious penalties like not being able to wield weapons, how does it affect the wearer ?) ?

  • stop giving its specific benefit and still do its job as a limb replacement, imposing no additional penalty to the wearer ?

Can elves, half-elves, warforged, and/or kalashtar be affected by Dream of the Blue Veil?

The Fey Ancestry racial trait shared by elves (Player’s Handbook, p. 23) and half-elves (p. 39) states “magic can’t put you to sleep.” Warforged’s Constructed Resilience trait is similar: “You don’t need to sleep, and magic can’t put you to sleep” (Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 36). Kalashtar have a racial trait called Severed from Dreams, which reads (p. 31):

Kalashtar sleep, but they don’t connect to the plane of dreams as other creatures do. Instead, their minds draw from the memories of their otherworldly spirit while they sleep. As such, you are immune to spells and other magical effects that require you to dream, like dream, but not to spells and other magical effects that put you to sleep, like sleep.

The spell dream of the blue veil begins with the following paragraph (Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, p. 106; emphasis mine):

You and up to eight willing creatures within range fall unconscious for the spell’s duration and experi­ence visions of another world on the Material Plane, such as Oerth, Toril, Krynn, or Eberron. If the spell reaches its full duration, the visions conclude with each of you encountering and pulling back a mys­terious blue curtain. The spell then ends with you mentally and physically transported to the world that was in the visions.

A sidebar next to the spell reads (p. 106, emphasis mine):

Transit between [different worlds on the Material Plane] is rare but not im­possible and can be accomplished in various ways. […One] method is the Dream of Other Worlds; trav­elers fall into a deep slumber and dream themselves into a new realm. The spell dream of the blue veil em­ploys this method of transit.

My question is, can elves, half-elves, warforged, and/or kalashtar be affected by dream of the blue veil?

My current interpretation of RAW is that the answer is “no” for all four creatures. The sidebar outright states that dream of the blue veil induces “slumber” (thus excluding elves, half-elves, and warforged from being affected) and causes its targets to dream (excluding kalashtar). However, there are a few reasons I might be wrong.

Nowhere in the spell’s actual text do the words “sleep,” “slumber,” or “dream” appear. It refers only to creatures becoming “unconscious” and experiencing “visions.” Contrast this with sleep, which “sends creatures into a magical slumber” and refers to its affected targets as “sleepers” (PHB, p. 276). Contrast also with dream, which “shapes a creature’s dreams,” doesn’t affect a target until it’s “asleep,” and explicitly states that “Creatures that don’t sleep, such as elves, can’t be contacted by this spell” (p. 236).

Commenters in this Reddit thread largely agree that the lack of sleep- and dream-related language in the spell’s text means RAW is that kalashtar can be affected. One commenter points out the similarity to the spell catnap, which can affect elves.

Maybe the Tasha’s Cauldron sidebar, like the title of the spell, is simply some extra lore that doesn’t affect gameplay. However, I see no reason to exclude sidebars from RAW. Many important rules, such as the ones for hiding (PHB, p. 177) and some rules governing wizards’ spellbooks (p. 114), appear only in sidebars.

Another Reddit commenter points to “Spell Spotlight: Dream of the Blue Veil,” a D&D Beyond article which contains the following sentence:

A kalashtar wizard who uses the dream [created by dream of the blue veil] to flee the agents of the Dreaming Dark by escaping to Krynn may buy themself enough time to gather new allies, new resources, and return to Eberron with a bold new plan to defeat their enemies.

This obviously implies that kalashtar can be affected by the spell. I imagine that this could be an oversight, and I don’t especially see why this article should be considered RAW. But again, I could be wrong.

Animate Dead in a zone affected by Hallow?

The hallow spell prevents undead from entering a certain area:

First, celestials, elementals, fey, fiends, and undead can’t enter the area, nor can such creatures charm, frighten, or possess creatures within it. Any creature charmed, frightened, or possessed by such a creature is no longer charmed, frightened, or possessed upon entering the area. You can exclude one or more of those types of creatures from this effect.

In addition, it has an optional effect to prevent dead bodies interred within from becoming undead:

Everlasting Rest. Dead bodies interred in the area can’t be turned into undead.

Assuming the caster of hallow did not select the Everlasting Rest option, if a character casts animate dead on a corpse within a hallow zone, what happens to the resulting zombie or skeleton?

Is the Psi Warrior’s Psionic Strike ability affected by critical hits?

The new Psi Warrior Fighter subclass has the feature Psionic Power which has the following option:

Psionic Strike. You can propel your weapons with psionic force. Once on each of your turns, immediately after you hit a target within 30 feet of you with an attack and deal damage to it with a weapon, you can expend one Psionic Energy die, rolling it and dealing force damage to the target equal to the number rolled plus your Intelligence modifier.

Is this ability affected by critical hits like a Paladin’s Divine Smite or does it deal extra damage independent from the attack?

Is a Circle of Stars Druid’s Chalice form affected by Grave Cleric’s Circle of Mortality?

If a Stars Druid/Grave Cleric multiclass were to use a Cure Wounds on an unconscious creature at 0 hp, and they designate that creature as a target of their Chalice form’s healing ability, does that mean they receive 16+double wisdom mod healing, or 8+1d8+double wisdom mod healing?

Circle of Mortality

At 1st level, you gain the ability to manipulate the line between life and death. When you would normally roll one or more dice to restore hit points with a spell to a creature at 0 hit points, you instead use the highest number possible for each die.

Chalice. A constellation of a life-giving goblet appears on you. Whenever you cast a spell using a spell slot that restores hit points to a creature, you or another creature within 30 feet of you can regain hit points equal to 1d8 + your Wisdom modifier.

Can the spell Booming Blade be affected by the Twinned Spell metamagic?

Booming blade is a Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide cantrip that allows the spellcaster to make a melee weapon attack with their weapon and add additional power to the attack:

You brandish the weapon used in the spell’s casting and make a melee attack with it against one creature within 5 feet of you. On a hit, the target suffers the weapon attack’s normal effects and then becomes sheathed in booming energy until the start of your next turn. If the target willingly moves 5 feet or more before then, the target takes 1d8 thunder damage, and the spell ends

Booming Blade, Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide, pg. 142

The Twinned Spell metamagic permits a Sorcerer to take any spell that targets only a single creature, and cast it twice, targeting a different creature.

When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, magic missile and scorching ray aren’t eligible, but ray of frost and chromatic orb are.

Twinned Spell, Player’s Handbook, pg. 102

It has been commonly accepted that this is a valid use of this metamagic/cantrip combo, but a recent Errata to the spell has changed its range to "Self (5-foot radius)". Is this spell still eligible to be Twinned?

Stone Shape: can the stone extend past the original affected area?

The spell Stone Shape allows the caster to reshape a stone object or section of stone:

You touch a stone object of Medium size or smaller or a section of stone no more than 5 feet in any dimension and form it into any shape that suits your purpose.

Can the reshaped stone extends past the original affected area?

For example, would it be possible to raise a stone pillar from the ground using this spell, or extend a stone wall into a ramp?

In what order are creatures affected by the Sleep spell?

I thought I understood the sleep spell, but now I’m confused about the order of creatures affected. I always thought it was from lowest current HP to highest.

However, near the end of the spell description, it says (emphasis mine):

Subtract each creature’s hit points from the total before moving on to the creature with the next lowest hit points.

Which to me would indicate that we are going from highest to lowest.

Is this a typo? In which order are creatures suppose to be affected by the sleep spell?

Does an out-of-sight creature affected by the Fear spell have to keep running if they fail the saving throw?

Imagine a (D&D 5e) spellcaster casts Fear on an enemy, and the enemy fails their Wisdom saving throw. On its turn, the enemy drops what it’s holding and takes the Dash action, running away from the spellcaster and around a corner, putting it out of sight of the spellcaster. The enemy ends its turn out-of-sight of the spellcaster, so it can make the Wisdom saving throw again; again, it fails. On its next turn does the enemy have to continue running away? Even though it’s out of sight of the spellcaster? My reading of the spell is yes: they have to continue to run away until they succeed on the save (or the spellcaster drops the spell for some other reason). Is this right, or can the enemy remain in place out-of-sight? (They obviously can’t approach closer to the spellcaster because they’re affected by the frightened condition.)