Does the Eldritch Knight’s Eldritch Strike feature impose disadvantage on a saving throw against a spell cast before the attack?

Consider the following scenario:

A level 10 Fighter with the Eldritch Knight (EK) archetype (PHB, p. 74-75) is facing a single opponent, and has hold person as a spell available.

  1. EK attacks with both attacks available. If both miss, they try again next turn. If either hits, Eldritch Strike (the level 10 archetype feature) triggers against the target, and EK will proceed to the next step.
  2. (a turn passes)
  3. On EK’s next turn, they cast hold person on the person targeted previously. The target has disadvantage on the save due to Eldritch Strike. If they still pass, EK goes back to square one. Otherwise, EK does the following:
  4. EK Action Surges (Fighter level 2 ability). They use the Attack action to get two attacks with advantage against the target. If either hits, it does critical damage (thanks to the paralyzed rider on hold person), and Eldritch Strike triggers.

The wording in Eldritch Strike is as follows:

When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, that creature has disadvantage on the next saving throw it makes against a spell you cast before the end of your next turn.

Does the target have disadvantage on the save against hold person it makes at the end of its next turn, even though hold person was cast before the triggering of the Eldritch Strike event that would impose disadvantage?

Silence = -4 to Notice against Sounds, but what about Notice against Stealth in general?

Silence gives anyone who tries to hear you -4 to their Notice roll (or an auto-fail with a Raise), but how much does this spell influence your Stealth roll where you also have to stay out of sight?

I am planning on combining Silence (-4/auto-fail to Notice) and Invisibility (-4/-6 to Notice), but I don’t know how to combine these numbers. Without the auto-fail I would’ve just added them up, but the auto-fail gives me the impression that it was intended that I don’t do that in general with these spells.

How can I design a magical weapon that grants an advantage against fire-base creatures without using water and choking effects?

The party I am DM’ing is going for an adventure to the Elemental Plane of Fire. I want to design a magical weapon that can grant an advantage against fire-based creatures. I see that Fire Elementals have Water Susceptibility (Cold Damage) but I have already house-ruled that elemental planes can not include magical effects of elements from other elemental planes, but just the spells that have elements of the current plane can be cast (as the plane purely consists of element of itself). For example, in the Elemental Plane of Air, not only Earth-based spells but all the spells are impeded, except air-based ones.

After I realized that I can’t use a magical weapon that has cold damage due to my house-rule, I wanted to give the weapon a "heavy smoke" effect to choke the fire, as I thought that fire can not live without oxygen. But this option conflicts with my house-rule, also I saw that the fire-based creatures any other fire source in the Elemental Plane of Fire don’t need air to live.

Now I have no idea how can I design a magical weapon that gives an advantage against fire-based creatures without cold damage and choking the fire via leaving without oxygen is not an option. I can not cancel my house-ruling because of the sake of my setting. I am open to any house ruling ideas beside the official ruling.

TLDR: as in title, how can I design a magical weapon that grants an advantage against fire-base creatures without using water and choking effects?

If the question shows up to be opinion-based, please accept my apologies.

What happens to an abjurer’s Arcane Ward when they fail the saving throw against a Banshee’s Wail?

An abjuration wizard has the Arcane Ward class feature (PHB, p. 115):

Starting at 2nd level, you can weave magic around yourself for protection. When you cast an abjuration spell of 1st level or higher, you can simultaneously use a strand of the spell’s magic to create a magical ward on yourself that lasts until you finish a long rest. The ward has hit points equal to twice your wizard level + your Intelligence modifier. Whenever you take damage, the ward takes the damage instead. If this damage reduces the ward to 0 hit points, you take any remaining damage.

A Banshee (MM, p. 23) has the Wail action:

Wail (1/Day). The banshee releases a mournful wail, provided that she isn’t in sunlight. This wail has no effect on constructs and undead. All other creatures within 30 feet of her that can hear her must make a DC 13 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, a creature drops to 0 hit points. On a success, a creature takes 10 (3d6) psychic damage.

If an abjuration wizard who has an Arcane Ward active fails their saving throw against a Banshee’s Wail, they would drop to 0 hit points. What happens to their ward?

  • Does it drop to 0 hit points instead of the wizard (meaning the wizard does not drop to 0 hit points)? The Wail ability is not damage (if you fail the save), whereas the Arcane Ward specifically mentions damage, so I assume this isn’t how it works…
  • Does it disappear when the wizard drops to 0 hit points? I don’t think anything about the Banshee’s Wail or dropping to 0 hit points generally would make it disappear…
  • Does it remain active? I’m assuming this is the most likely answer, given my above reasoning…

What happens when an unconscious creature fails their saving throw against a Banshee’s Wail?

A Banshee (MM, p. 23) has the Wail action:

Wail (1/Day). The banshee releases a mournful wail, provided that she isn’t in sunlight. This wail has no effect on constructs and undead. All other creatures within 30 feet of her that can hear her must make a DC 13 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, a creature drops to 0 hit points. On a success, a creature takes 10 (3d6) psychic damage.

If someone was already at 0 hit points (for example, having failed their saving throw against a different Banshee’s Wail), what would happen if they fail their saving throw against this Banshee’s Wail (assuming they still need to make a saving throw)?

  • The unconscious creature takes one step towards death, as though they took damage (thus making the saving throw meaningless, since they’d take a step towards death either way);
  • The unconscious creature just dies (unlikely, but in case there’s something written that would imply this hidden in the rules somewhere);
  • Nothing, since this isn’t damage, its just an effect (meaning the unconscious creature would be better off failing this save than passing in this case!)
  • Something else…

What bonus would be balanced against a restriction on a changeling powers?

I am playing as a changeling in a new campaign where every officially published races are accepted. We told the DM the races and classes we wanted to play in advance and he was OK with it. However, during the first session, he said that my changeling will only be able to change their appearance once per day, during a long rest.

I am going to try to negotiate a bonus in exchange for this restriction.
There are two options I’d like to propose, but don’t know which one would be fair :

  1. The actor feat – So even if my character can’t change very often, they are very good at it.

  2. Unsettling visage, from the UA version of the changeling – It’s in theme and could be fun to describe.

I like "Actor" more, but would it be balanced to get it at first level?

(Please tell me if there are any mistake, English isn’t my first language)

Using other programming languages for malware against EDR?

As an example, one of the most basic malware to inject into a process to get a C2 beacon goes like this:

Get Handle of a process -> VirtualAllocEx -> WriteProcessMemory -> CreateRemoteThread 

Now writing this in C/C++ is quite native as it can easily communicate with WinAPI. Are there any benefits in writing this in another programming language such as Golang or Rust to fight against EDR, not just an AV with static analysis checks? More specifically EDRs that are hooking and calling JMP to those WinAPI calls?

My question comes from the rise of .NET and C# with a lot of use cases such as using LOLBAS csc.exe to compile on machine or execute-assembly to load .NET assemblies in unmanaged codespace or process. However, this still use WinAPI by using P/Invoke (and now D/Invoke).

  1. Are there any benefits in using other programming language to call WinAPI function to fight against EDR?
  2. Are there any other ways of creating malware (e.g. dropper) besides calling WinAPI?
  3. Like with .NET and C#, will there be a new rise in existing (other) languages such as Go or Rust.

Does it make any sense to take an aim action against an invisible target?

Checking over a battle with a caster versus an arcane archer/rogue. The caster, a bard, in this case, casts invisibility on themself. The archer still takes aim and hits with an advantage.

So my question is, does it make sense for the arcane archer/rogue to use their bonus action for aiming against an invisible target and still gain advantage to their initial attack roll?

Just seems a little funky to me that it was allowed because it doesn’t seem to make a whole lot of sense in the first place; at least not without a good perception roll…

ANYDICE – Help with a dice pool showing success against a range of target numbers

I’m having a hard time coding an anydice script to show what I want.

Let me contextualize the mechanic I’m trying to simulate:

You roll a POOL of d10 against a TARGET number. If at least one die from the POOL is equal to or higher than the TARGET, the roll is a success. The count of such dice is the degree of success, but that isn’t my focus at the moment.

I’d like to have a graph for the chances of success of various POOLs of different sizes up to 10 (1d10, 2d10, 3d10…10d10) against different TARGETs from 2 to 10 (2, 3, 4… 10).

The caveat is: I’d like the graph to be layed out in such a way that:

  • the x axis represents the TARGETs;
  • the y axis represents the chances of at least 1 success;
  • each line represents a POOL,

so I can see the chances that each POOL has to succeed against a whole range of TARGETs.

Can any anydice wizard help me with this, please?