Does Dimentional Slide arcanist exploit allows you to avoid AoO from the starting possition of movement?

I recently had a discussion with my GM about Dimensional Slide exploit. The problem is the wording of the exploit:

"This ability is used as part of a move action or withdraw action, allowing her to move up to 10 feet per arcanist level to any location she can see. This counts as 5 feet of movement. She can only use this ability once per round. She does not provoke attacks of opportunity when moving in this way, but any other movement she attempts as part of her move action provokes as normal."

I haven’t found any rules about the description of "as a part of move action". Is it ment that I must start moving, for example, from threatened square, provoking an AoO, then do DS, or simply perform DS w/o any AoOs?

It is unclear that "as part of the action" require you to make this action exclusively in the middle of an action, not before or after it.

Please, follow your answer with some rules link, so it can be approved point, not just an opinion, because i really need some solid evidence ;D

Thank you.

P.S. I’ve read the thread below, and it states that I can avoid AoOs from any point of blinking, but it has no proof of ability to do so by rules.

Arcanist Dimensional Slide usage specific cases!

Does the Beast Master’s Primal Companion feature allows the beast to take two Actions in a single turn?

I watched a video from Dungeon Dudes on YouTube where they rated the Ranger subclasses. Around the 23:18 mark, they mentioned that the new Beast Master’s Primal Companion feature from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything can allow the Ranger to forgo one of their attacks to allow the Beast to take the Attack action, on top of the action that they can make using the Ranger’s bonus action. The Primal Companion feature description says the following:

Primal Companion

[…]
In combat the beast acts during your turn. It can move and use its reaction on its own, but the only action it takes is the Dodge action, unless you take a bonus action on your turn to command it to take another action. That action can be one in its stat block or some other action. You can also sacrifice one of your attacks when you take the Attack action to command the beast to take the Attack action. If you are incapacitated, the beast can take any action of its choice, not just Dodge.
[…]

As far as I know, a creature can only take one action on their turn. Is this a specific ruling for the Primal Companion since it doesn’t have its own turn because "it acts on your [the Ranger’s] turn?" Also does this mean that the Ranger can break up their movement, actions, and bonus actions with the Beast’s on their turn, essentially controlling two characters freely? In the video, Monty mentioned that a level 11 Beast Master Ranger can make one attack and have the beast attack four times which is crazy in my opinion.

Is there any official (or semi-official) clarification on how often Psychic Virtuoso allows a character to use occult skill unlocks?

The description of the Psychic Virtuoso feat from Occult Adventures states "You can use all of your occult skill unlocks more often and you are more talented at using them." However, the Benefit section only lists a bonus for using them, nothing about using them more often. I cannot find any errata or clarification for this feat indicating either it doesn’t actually let you use occult skill unlocks more often or, if it does, how often it allows a character to use them.

The 5e Inquisitive Subclass allows perception checks as a bonus action. Would that matter in a heavily obscured area during combat?

Let’s say an Inquisitive is in a fog cloud. By my understanding, advantage and disadvantage cancels out if you are fighting someone else in that cloud. But if you were able to make a bonus perception check (and succeed) before attacking, could that negate your disadvantage?

As far as I can tell, there are no direct rule applications but I just wondered if someone had any thoughts on it. I guess in my head, using your action to search for someone when you can’t see due to environmental conditions them isn’t that useful for attacking purposes. But if you were to use a bonus action (in effect searching and attacking near simultaneously) would that change anything?

Same question for attacking from outside said hazard. I search, find, and shoot arrow – negate disadvantage?

Can FIDO be implemented for a Use Case which Allows the Use of Shared Devices?

I am a part of an organization that is developing a website that required user authentication, and we are strongly considering FIDO compliance.

However, our use case requires users to be able to log-in from shared computers (i.e. father and son may share the same computer). And we cannot expect our user to carry around a FIDO authentication token (U2F key) as well.

In such a scenario, is it safe to use on-device biometric sensors (i.e. cameras, fingerprint scanner) on a shared device to authenticate multiple users?

Does the “Step of the Wind” ability allows you to take the extra jump without using Dash or Disengage Bonus Action

I was playing a game of 5e DnD the other day and got into a disagreement with the DM. I have a monk character that made a long jump off a wall using Step of the Wind. The plan was to do Flurry of Blows after landing, but the DM said that I couldn’t use Flurry of Blows because I had burned my Bonus Action on Step of the Wind. This is the ability:

Flurry of Blows: After you take the Attack action on your turn, you can spend 1 ki point to make two unarmed strikes as a bonus action.

My DM said that I have to take a Bonus Action before getting the jump bonus. I believe that taking a Bonus Action is optional and you can get double-jump without using a Bonus Action. It does not explicitly say you have to take the bonus action like Flurry of Blows and Shadow Step do:

Shadow Step: When you are in dim light or darkness, as a bonus action you can teleport up to 60 feet to an unoccupied space you can see that is also in dim light or darkness. You then have advantage on the first melee attack you make before the end of the turn.

Flurry of Blows: After you take the Attack action on your turn, you can spend 1 ki point to make two unarmed strikes as a bonus action.

You can see that Shadow Step says that "You then" (after teleporting), and Flurry of Blows says that "After you take the Attack action". If you go back to "Step of the Wind" you can see that it doesn’t say anything about after the Bonus Action you get the jump bonus.

I would like your response because we both think differently!

What allows meterpreter to migrate processes and how to defend against it?

I mainly use Linux so I’m not well-versed on how Windows and its privileges work. I’ve recently learned to use Metasploit and meterpreter on Windows boxes.

Previous research

This answer has given an overview of how meterpreter migrates on Windows.
This article has addressed process migration on Linux

My questions

  1. What allows process migration to work?
  2. What are the main differences between Windows and Linux in process migration?
  3. Is this migration a feature or a vulnerability?
  4. How can I defend it?
  5. Should I try to prevent process migration?

Rarity for an item that allows a reroll once per day

I had an idea for a homebrew magic item – at least, I think it’s homebrew as I can’t find anything similar online; but I was sure the Critical Role crew have something similar…

Stone of Luck

Once per day, you may activate this stone targeting one creature you can touch. For the next hour, that creature may reroll one Ability Check, Attack Roll or Saving Throw of their choice (they must use the new roll).

What rarity would you assign to this? I think (I’m hoping) it feels Uncommon, but I’m really not sure.

What happens when initiative allows a player to act before the player that started the combat?

This example is a somewhat simplified version of what happened during the last game I DMed for a bunch of friends. A party of PCs was trudging through the woods when they happened upon a very small outpost in a clearing containing hostile elves. The rogue goes and checks it out, and sees two hostiles patrolling, one near the northern edge of woods (Elf1), one on a stone platform about 15 ft from the southern edge of the forest (Elf2).

The rogue goes back and relays the information. If the warrior of the party would simply trudge into the middle of the clearing, all enemies would be aware of a threat and the enemy wouldn’t be surprised. They want to start combat with an edge, so they formulate a plan that would cause the enemies to be surprised: the rogue will go stealth up to the northern edge of the clearing, wait for Elf1 to get close, and sneak attack him. When that happens (it’s a small clearing, so it’s within his vision) the warrior in the party, who will attempt to sneak up to the southern edge of the forest, will run for Elf2 and beat him up. They both roll great stealth checks and head to their positions. So far so good.

The rogue waits for Elf1 to get close and attacks with his short sword. Time for combat, and this is where things got confusing, and where a discussion broke out between players:

According to page 189 of the PHB:

  1. Determine surprise — Both Elf1 and Elf2 are surprised, because they didn’t notice any threat.
  2. Establish positions — Should be clear from the description of the situation above.
  3. Roll Initiative — The warrior gets a 20, Elf2 a 15, the rogue a 5, and Elf1 a 1.
  4. Take Turns — The warrior can go first. However, as the party discussed before, he was supposed wait until he sees the rogue hit Elf1. The rogue’s attack is what started the combat encounter, yet the attack hasn’t been resolved yet due to his poor initiative roll. And you can’t delay your turn in 5th edition.

Option 1: Some people at the table argue that he can’t yet run into the clearing because that would pose a clear and noticeable threat and the elves would not be surprised. He should wait for the rogue to hit Elf1 and use the Ready action on his first turn. This option seems to punish the warrior for rolling well on his initiative.

Option 2: As determining surprise occurs before the initiative roll according to page 189 of the PHB, I would argue that the rules support that the warrior should be able to run up to Elf2 and hit him, without breaking surprise. The fact that the attack that caused the surprise hasn’t yet been resolved and that this goes somewhat counter against their agreed plan of waiting for the rogue to hit Elf1, makes this option incredibly unintuitive though.

Which of these options is the correct one? Or is there a hidden option 3?

Where can I find this Discipline that allows a Vampire to disbelieve in sunlight, stakes, etc. so strongly that it can ignore them?

I had a character around 2001 that I was working on for a game that fell apart, and while reading through some book I came upon a very high-power ability that allowed a Vampire to disbelieve in something so strongly that it didn’t exist for it any more. This could be anything, including doors, which would allow for entry into any room, or blood, which would be less than bright.

I have not been able to find this particular Discipline since, and I would love it if someone can tell me what it is and which sourcebook it’s in.