Is it possible to create an “always on” environment from a SQL Server on premises to a virtual machine on azure?

I’ve been looking for a similar question here and reading about it about ""Add Azure Replica Wizard", but I heard the it doesnt works because it’s a deprecated feature.

I used to have a primary server and a secondary server on premises as always on, but because of costs I had to delete the secondary "replica".

I would like to know if it’s possible to recreate this always on environment, and then have the primary server On Premises, and a replicated environment on a virtual machine on Azure Cloud.

Then if something happens with our primary, automatically the secondary replica on azure will take the work.

Datfortress’s programs are always visible in their cells, or triggered only when Netrunner pass by their cell?

In all the samples of Netmap, we can see data fortress with walls, gates, CPUs, memories, and also programs in a determined cell.

Now I wonder, when the netrunner enters in the subgrid and starts to attack the fortress, does he see the program in a far cell (if visibility is not blocked by an obstacle and withing 20 spaces)? Or the map that the netrunner sees, doesn’t show the location of programs and will be the referee to decide when a program appear in that determined cell, probably triggered by the netrunner or other programs passing by that cell?

Also, not all programs have "endurance", and they should be deactivated at the end of their action at the end of the turn, so how is possible that Datafortress has all its programs always activated?

So this makes me think that programs are "preassigned" to a cell, but they are like in a sleeping mode, and only after triggering they appear doing their action. Can somebody explain how you did in your netrunner mini-games?

Online Fax Services Comparison – Why You Should Always Compare Before Buying

We have all been there, bought a produc  ARGENTINA FAX BROADCAST LISThttps://www.faxlistb.com/argentina-fax-broadcast-list/ or service only to find out later that it did not measure up to our expectations. Most times if we’re lucky, the purchased item can be returned and we are fully refunded. However, we have still wasted a lot of time and if you’re running a business, time means money. That’s why everyone should make it their own personal policy to totally compare and research a service or product before they buy.
That goes doubly true for a long term service like online fax. Usually, once you have received your fax number and start sending it out to all your contacts, you have made a commitment of sorts to having the service long term. You simply must do a little homework to make sure you get a service or provider that won’t disappoint you or your company down the road. Now that we have the Internet, that’s relatively very easy to do.
For those who are new to these types of services, it should be stated that Internet or online fax is simply using your present email account and your web connection to do all your faxing. You get a local or toll-free number which is connected to your email address, once you get a fax, you receive an email with the fax attached. Basically, you’re hiring the services of an online provider who will handle all your faxes in exchange for a small monthly fee. These web based fax services are paperless, very efficient, totally portable and much cheaper than conventional methods of faxing.
While some services do let you “port” your fax number, it’s best to pick the right provider the first time around. So you need to do your due diligence and carefully examine the different plans and different providers to meet your needs. One simple way to approach this problem is to just compare the different providers. Just compare some basic factors of each provider on your list to come up with the one best suited to meet your needs.
These factors would include: quality of the overall service, pricing, overage fees, amount of online storage, length of storage, support hours, number of email addresses, any hidden fees, set-up fees, corporate plans or services and whether or not the service has a free trial? All valid questions you should ask before signing up to any one of these providers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6878262

Are Online Problems always harder than the Offline equivalent?

I am currently studying Online-Algorithms, and I just asked myself if online Problems are always harder than the offline equivalent.

The most probable answer ist yes, but I can’t figure the reason out why.

Actually I have a second more specific question. When an offline Problem has some integrality gap ($ IG\in[1,\infty) $ ) we know in an offline setting, that there is generally no randomized rounding algorithm which achieves a ratio $ C\geq IG$ .

Can this just be adapted to the online problem? If some fractional algorithm has competitive ratio $ c_{frac}$ can some randomized rounding scheme only reach competitive ratio as good as $ \frac{c_{frac}}{IG}$ ?

Thanks in advance.

If a feature gives proficiency in a skill you are proficient with, can you always choose any skill to replace that proficiency?

Page 125 of the PHB has this statement:

If a character would gain the same proficiency from two different sources, he or she can choose a different proficiency of the same kind (skill or tool) instead.

This statement is given in the context of character creation, and specifically skill proficiencies given by backgrounds.

Does this rule apply to any feature gained at any level that gives proficiencies, or only at first level?

Does an Adamantine greatclub always deal critical damage like other Adamantine weapons?

In general adamantine weapons always deal critical damage on a hit:

Whenever an adamantine weapon or piece of ammunition hits an object, the hit is a critical hit.

– Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, page 78.

However, in SKT chapter 6 room 14 (page 154) it says:

She wields an adamantine greatclub. This magic weapon has no bonus to attack or damage rolls.

Does this mean it also does not crit? Or does it still crit like adamantine weapons do in general, but simply has no +n to attack or damage roll?

Also: is this a property of this particular weapon in this adventure? Or is it a property that always applies to adamantine greatclubs?

Outside of D&D lore this would make sense because adamantine is a very light material but is still very strong and can be sharpened. This makes is a great material for piercing and slashing weapons (swords, axes, arrows), but a terrible material for bludgeoning damage. However, I don’t know if this applies in D&D lore as well (I haven’t read it anywhere up untill now).

SQL Server 2019 Always On using Distributed Network Name

We’re running a couple SQL servers in Azure that are set up with an Always On availability group and Windows Failover Clustering. The servers are Windows 2019 and we’re running SQL Server 2019. When we set up the cluster, it was set up to use a Distributed Network Name instead of a static cluster IP address. Thanks to this we shouldn’t need an internal load balancer according to these notes: https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/azure-docs/issues/34648.

I’m struggling to understand exactly how this works though. Based on what I read, it seems like our connection strings will point to the DNS name of the cluster (let’s call it AgCluster). If I look in DNS, there is an A record for AgCluster pointing to sql1 and another pointing to sql2. When I use AgCluster in my connection string it seems to always connect me to the primary server, even if I have ApplicationIntent=ReadOnly set. When I query @@SERVERNAME I always get the same server.

So with the Distributed Network Name setup, what should I use in my connection strings to make sure read/write queries go to the primary and read only go to a secondary? Any guides on setting this up in general would be helpful. Thanks!

AES encryption (in Java) of different JSON strings always produce same encrypted string as result. Why?

I have a program written in Java which takes JSON string as argument, encrypts it using AES then encodes it using Base64. JSON string is like:

{"a": "b"} or {"a": "n"} or {"a": "k"}  

I.e related object would have one property a. Value part is randomly generated.

Program outputs for above JSON inputs looks like

UBNvKoRoGqk0PTQQL5K4Sw== bKwlToSND3HkceDExEDXSw== u/yKJq1FdoifBM+AnadC3A== 

i.e. they are unique.

Same goes for {"a":"gn"} — random string with length 2. Same for 3 and so on.

But starting from 7 program produces the same encoded string for different inputs. I mean following JSON strings taken as input:

{"a": "pzfovvs"} {"a": "bqwuvck"} 

produces same string as output:

Dwg0Xjkot8UBfn+vbcCfOS4KluXB6RCFQ932Y9ABtIg= 

Same goes for length 8 and 9. Starting from 10 results became unique again.

What is the explanation of this strange phenomenon?

(I can post code if needed.)

Ok, here is the code:

import java.security.Key; import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException; import java.util.Base64; import javax.crypto.Cipher; import javax.crypto.KeyGenerator;  public class JWTEncryptor {  private static String algorithm = "AES"; private static Key key; private static KeyGenerator keyGenerator; private static Cipher cipher;  public static String encrypt(String jwt) throws Exception {     if (key == null || cipher == null) {         setUp();     }     cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key);     return Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(cipher.doFinal(jwt.getBytes("UTF-8"))); }  private static void setUp() {     try {         cipher = Cipher.getInstance(algorithm);     } catch (Exception e1) {         e1.printStackTrace();     }     if (keyGenerator != null) {         key = keyGenerator.generateKey();         return;     }     try {         keyGenerator = KeyGenerator.getInstance(algorithm);         key = keyGenerator.generateKey();     } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {         e.printStackTrace();     } }  public static String decrypt(String encryptedJWT) throws Exception {     cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key);     return new     String(cipher.doFinal(Base64.getDecoder().decode(encryptedJWT))); }   } 

Does melee spell attack always replace melee damage?

I was wondering if Shocking Grasp would be 18d(+ spell modifier) or 1d6+(attack modifier) as well as the 1d8roll

Shocking Grasp (Range: Touch) Make a melee spell attack against the target. You have advantage on the attack roll if the target is wearing armor made of metal. On a hit, the target takes 1d8 lightning damage, and it can’t take reactions until the start of its next turn.

I am assuming as it’s a cantrip it’s just the 1d8 but I want to check because it’s unclear to me