How to Remove or Deactivate “Application Passwords” in WordPress

With version 5.6, I got this new weird "Application Passwords" under all user profiles. No idea what it is and what it does except for what it says — and I want it gone.

If anyone knows how to remove this using __return_false with a filter or something, please tell me. I’ve googled and looked at the developers handbook and so far; nothing.

See image for more information.Application Passwords

Capturing SQL calls sent to a remote server from application

First of all, I’m not well versed in SQL anything at all. Closest I’ve ever needed to get was storing and retrieving data from a local SQLite db.

In essence I think I have a simple problem but it’s hard to orient yourself when everything is new.

My main tool at work is an ERP software, which is basically a front end to an SQL db.

Problem I have with it is that it’s very clumsy and doesn’t allow automation of even the most basic tasks.

What I want to do, is bypass the front-end completely and interact directly with the db to automate most of my tasks with python.

I can connect to the database just fine from python environment, but the schema is gigantic, there’s no way I’ll be able to find whatever it is I might be looking for.

So I need to capture the call front-end sends when I click a button (telling it to display specific set of data) to use that call as a guide.

Basically, how can I, an SQL noob, capture calls that a desktop application sends to a remote server?

Edit 1: My job is mostly analytical, so all of my automation will be for retrieval, analysis and visualization. I’m not very likely to mess anything up.

Edit 2: Tried running a Profiler and got the message:

"In order to run a trace against SQL Server you must be a member of sysadmin fixed server role or have the ALTER TRACE permission."

I’m not a sysadmin, don’t have an alter trace permission and reeeally don’t feel like asking for it 😀

How to handle wrong application of Spells?

So I am a DM for 2 sessions now (Including a training-montage’esque session 0, so 3 in total) and my group is completely new to DnD. Our Paladin has the Detect Good and Evil spell, and apparently uses it rather as a "Detect if there is something dangerous ahead"-Spell, for example to identify a bunch of herbs which were advertised as antidote.

Now for my question: Should I rather push them into reading the spell description again and advise against using the spell in such a manner, or would it be better practice if I just let them waste the spell like that, until they eventually learn it by themselves?

The whirpool application of the Control Water spell leads to several questions regarding creatures caught in it

As written, the whirlpool usage of the Control Water spell says:

Whirlpool. This effect requires a body of water at least 50 feet square and 25 feet deep. You cause a whirlpool to form in the center of the area. The whirlpool forms a vortex that is 5 feet wide at the base, up to 50 feet wide at the top, and 25 feet tall. Any creature or object in the water and within 25 feet of the vortex is pulled 10 feet toward it. A creature can swim away from the vortex by making a Strength (Athletics) check against your spell save DC.

When a creature enters the vortex for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there, it must make a Strength saving throw. On a failed save, the creature takes 2d8 bludgeoning damage and is caught in the vortex until the spell ends. On a successful save, the creature takes half damage, and isn’t caught in the vortex. A creature caught in the vortex can use its action to try to swim away from the vortex as described above, but has disadvantage on the Strength (Athletics) check to do so.

The first time each turn that an object enters the vortex, the object takes 2d8 bludgeoning damage; this damage occurs each round it remains in the vortex.

Are creatures or objects in the water and within 25′ of the vortex automatically pulled 10′ toward it? Do they continue to be pulled 10′ further toward the center of the vortex every round they are in it? Is a creature or object caught in the vortex also pulled down toward the bottom? On a failed save, are they caught for the entire duration of the spell, with no more chance at saves, or until they can swim free of it? On a failed save, does a creature continue to take 2d8 bludgeoning damage every round they are in the vortex? Can the whirlpool be cast so that it is completely underwater? Also, can the whirlpool be cast ‘upside down’ so the widest part is at the bottom?

What is the application of symbols in the cultural extension of UWP?

In Traveller-5, worldgen step E includes creating the world’s cultural extension (Cx), the last digit of which is “symbols.” The rule book explains only that:

Symbols used by the culture may range from the concrete (idol; totems; statuary) to the abstract (symbolized belief systems; group affiliations).

Given that the value is computed as Tech Level + Flux with a minimum of 1, one can easily infer that more primitive cultures have a lower value while more advanced cultures have a higher value. One also might infer from the brief description that the axis it measures has more “concrete” symbols at the lower range and more “abstract” symbols at the higher end.

How is this value applied to describing the world’s culture?

[Responses relevant to other editions of Traveller besides 5 are useful.]

Authentication in Next.js application (SSR SPA with long sessions)

We’re currently developing a Next.js application (server side rendering) and are looking for secure ways to keep the users logged in for longer periods of time.

AFAIK this can either be done using silent authentication or refresh tokens. General note: When a user is not logged in yet, we can redirect the user to a login page. If the user enters their credentials, we use the Authorisation Code Grant (to my knowledge PKCE is not needed in this case as it’s all server side during these steps) that will redirect back and respond with an authorisation code. We can then exchange this authorisation code with an access token (and refresh token) using a client secret (all server side).

Refresh Tokens

Since any client side storage (local storage, cookies, etc.) is not safe (XSS attacks) for storing any kind of tokens (especially refresh tokens), we are wondering if it’s generally safe to store a refresh token (and access token) in a HTTP only cookie considering that…

  • … the token values are encrypted, e.g. AES, with a secret that is not exposed to the client side.
  • … the refresh tokens are rotating, so when you retrieve a new access token with your refresh token, you also receive a new refresh token. The old refresh token is invalidated and if used again, all refresh tokens are invalidated.
  • … the refresh token automatically expires after a couple of days, e.g. 7 days.

Silent Authentication

A possible alternative could be silent authentication via an auth request on the server side (prompt=none). The auth session for the silent authentication would also be stored in a HTTP only cookie.

In both scenarios, it’s probably necessary to make sure that the client doesn’t know about any of these tokens (You could potentially use silent authentication on the client side using an iframe (the domain is the same, just different subdomains) but the client would then potentially receive a new access tokens which has to be stored in memory (potential XSS vulnerability)).

Since it’s a server side rendered SPA, the client side still needs to be able to get new data from the API server using the access token. For this, we were thinking of using Next.js API routes as a proxy: So, if the client wants to get new data, it will send an AJAX request to the respective Next.js API route. The controller for this Next.js API route is able to read and decrypt the HTTP only cookie and can therefore send the request to the API server with a valid access token in the HTTP header. Just before the short lived access token expired, the controller would need to first send a request to the auth server to retrieve a new access (and refresh) token and then continue sending the request with the new access token to the API server.

While this sounds good and feasible in theory, we are wondering about the following points: 1.) Is it generally safe to save a (rotating) refresh and access token in a HTTP only cookie? Does the cookie value need to be encrypted or is that unnecessary? Does a rotating refresh token offer any additional security in this case? 2.) Is the “Next.js API route as a proxy” method a secure way to make sure that the client side can get new data from the API server? If e.g. otherdomain.com would try to send a request to the (“unprotected”) Next.js API route, it would not respond with any data as it’s a different domain and the HTTP only cookies therefore not accessible, correct? Is CSRF possible for these Next.js API routes? 3.) Is it safe if the HTTP only cookie for the refresh token is shared across all subdomains and not tied to one specific subdomain (application)? This would allow us to access the cookie from e.g. the actual website or other subdomains. 4.) Is the refresh token approach better / safer than the silent authentication approach?

Follow-Up question: Can the refresh token approach also be used the authenticate users in a browser extension? So:

1.) The user logs in (Authorisation Code Grant with PKCE): The login prompt/page is shown in a popup (or new tab) and the communication (authorisation code) is done through postMessage. 2.) The background script receives the authorisation code and exchanges it for an access token and rotating refresh token (which is probably necessary in this flow (?)) using the code and a code verifier. These tokens can then be saved in Chrome storage. We can potentially also encrypt the tokens but I’m not sure if that offers any additional protection (?) considering that the background script is not the same as a server. 3.) If the Chrome extension wants to receive data from the API server, it sends a message to the background script which will then send the API request using the tokens saved in Chrome storage.

Using slot and application to variable length vector

I have a list of 2D coordinates with a maximum length of 3, e.g.

peakdatAB {{1007.81, 8.64842}, {1008.38, 8.19264}} 

I need to generate something like this

({PointSize[0.01], Blue, Point[#1], Red, Point[#2], Black, Point[#3]}) & @@ peakdatAB 

but here the problem is the variable length of peakdatAB as when there is say no third point, it returns an error. How can I fix this?

Correct application of the CFL Pumping Lemma

I came across this question about showing that the language $ L = \{w \epsilon \{a, b, c\}^*: n_a(w) + n_b(w) = n_c(w)\}$ is context-free but not linear in the book by Peter Linz. That is easily doable by the separate pumping lemma for linear languages (as given in Linz’s book), but my question is different.

Evidently this is a CFL, and a pushdown automaton can be constructed for it. But if I apply the pumping lemma for CFLs, I find that I’m able to pump strings that don’t belong to the language, which would mean that the language is not a CFL. Clearly I’m doing something wrong.

Going by the "game-like" format given in Linz, say you pick $ w = a^mb^mc^{2m}$ , $ |w| \ge m$ . The adversary can choose a number of decompositions $ w = uvxyz$ , they can look like -:

  • $ v = a^k, y = a^l$ : The case where $ |vxy|$ is contained within the $ a$ ‘s of the string. Pump $ i = 0$ , and then $ w_0 = a^{m – (k + l)}b^mc^{2m}$ cannot be in the language since the equality no longer holds.
  • $ v = a^k, y = b^l$ : The case where $ v$ is in the $ a$ section, $ x$ spans across the $ a$ ‘s and $ b$ ‘s, and $ y$ is in the $ b$ section. Again, pump $ i = 0$ . $ w_0 = a^{m – k}b^{m – l}c^{2m}$ cannot be in the language.

There are more cases like these. Where am I going wrong in the application of the CFL PL?