Is my Urban Ranger Class Archetype / Variant balanced?

(Homebrewery Link)

Design Considerations

I used various Reddit comments, the Pathfinder 1e Ranger Archetype, and the 3.5 UA Archetype as my guides for this class variant. The idea is to use the Alternate Class Features UA (maybe also in Tasha’s?) to flavor the Ranger without creating a class from scratch.

The Class Archetype / Features

Alternate Skills

Choose three from Animal Handling, Athletics, Insight, Investigation, Perception, Persuasion, Stealth, and Survival (removed Nature from the stock list)

Alternate Spell List

The urban ranger’s spell list is different from the standard ranger list. The following spells are eliminated from the urban ranger’s spell list:

1st Level

Animal Friendship, Speak with Animals

2nd Level

Animal Messenger, Barkskin, Locate Animals or Plants, Spike Growth

3rd Level

Conjure Animals, Plant Growth, Speak with Plants, Water Walk

4th Level

Conjure Woodland Beings

5th Level

Commune with Nature, Tree Stride

In exchange, the urban ranger adds the following spells to their class list:

1st Level

Comprehend Languages, Message

2nd Level

Detect Thoughts, Hold Person, Knock, Invisibility

3rd Level

Dispel Magic, Glyph of Warding,Speak with Dead, Tongues

4th Level

Greater Invisibility

5th Level

Hold Monster, Mislead

Recommended Alternate Class Features

Because of the multiple sources, I ended up with two options to replace Land’s Stride. It’s entirely possible that mixing them would be enough, but I didn’t want it to end up OP so I opted to give the player a choice.

  • City Explorer
  • Favored Enemy, Revised
  • Urban Awareness
  • Greater Favored Enemy, Revised
  • Favored Community
  • Push Through or Fleet of Foot
  • Blend In

Alternate Class Features

City Explorer

1st-level ranger feature (Replaces Natural Explorer)

You are a master of navigating the winding streets and alleyways of cities and towns, and you react with swift and decisive action when attacked. This grants you the following benefits when inside a town or city:

  • You ignore difficult terrain.
  • You have advantage on initiative rolls.
  • On your first turn during combat, you have advantage on attack rolls against creatures that have not yet acted.

In addition, you are skilled in urban navigation. You gain the following benefits when traveling for an hour or more:

  • Difficult terrain doesn’t slow your group’s travel.
  • Your group can’t become lost except by magical means.
  • Even when you are engaged in another activity while traveling (such as foraging, navigating, or tracking), you remain alert to danger.
  • If you are traveling alone, you can move stealthily at a normal pace.
  • When you scrounge, forage, or dumpster-dive, you find twice as much food as you normally would.
  • While tracking other creatures, you also learn their exact number, their sizes, and how long ago they passed through the area.

Favored Enemy, Revised (Urban)

1st-level ranger feature (Replaces Favored Enemy)

Beginning at 1st level, you have significant experience studying, tracking, hunting, and even talking to a certain type of enemy commonly encountered in cities and towns.

Choose a type of favored enemy: aberrations, beasts, celestials, constructs, dragons, elementals, fey, fiends, giants, monstrosities, oozes, plants, or undead. Alternatively, you can select two races of humanoid (such as gnolls and orcs) as favored enemies.

Another alternative, with the DM’s approval, an urban ranger may select an organization instead of a creature type as his favored enemy. For example, a character might select a particular thieves’ guild, merchant house, or even the city guard. The favored enemy bonuses would apply to all members of the chosen organization, regardless of their creature type or subtype.

You gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls with weapon attacks against creatures of the chosen type. Additionally, you have advantage on Intelligence (Inivestigation) checks to track your favored enemies, as well as on Intelligence checks to recall information about them. Also, if the Alternate Ability Skills variant rule is being used, you have advantage on Charisma (Investigation) to gather information about your chosen enemy.

When you gain this feature, you also learn one language of your choice, typically one spoken by your favored enemy or creatures associated with it. However, you are free to pick any language you wish to learn.

Urban Awareness

3rd-level ranger feature (Replaces Primeval Awareness)

Beginning at 3rd level, your mastery of ranger lore allows you to establish a powerful link to beasts and to the city around you.

You have an innate ability to communicate with beasts, and they recognize you as a kindred spirit. Through sounds and gestures, you can communicate simple ideas to a beast as an action, and can read its basic mood and intent. You learn its emotional state, whether it is affected by magic of any sort, its short-term needs (such as food or safety), and actions you can take (if any) to persuade it to not attack.

You cannot use this ability against a creature that you have attacked within the past 10 minutes.

Additionally, you can attune your senses to determine if any of your favored enemies lurk nearby. By spending 1 uninterrupted minute in concentration (as if you were concentrating on a spell), you can sense whether any of your favored enemies are present within 5 miles of you, or within city limits, whichever is smaller. This feature reveals which of your favored enemies are present, their numbers, and the creatures’ general direction and distance (in miles) from you.

If there are multiple groups of your favored enemies within range, you learn this information for each group.

Greater Favored Enemy, Revised (Urban)

6th-level ranger feature (Replaces Favored Enemy improvement)

At 6th level, you are ready to hunt even deadlier game. Choose a second type of favored enemy: aberrations, beasts, celestials, constructs, dragons, elementals, fey, fiends, giants, monstrosities, oozes, plants, or undead. Alternatively, you can select two more races of humanoid (such as gnolls and orcs) as favored enemies, or an organization with the DM’S approval. You gain all the benefits against this chosen enemy that you normally gain against your favored enemy, including an additional language. Your bonus to damage rolls against all your favored enemies increases to +4.

Additionally, you have advantage on saving throws against the spells and abilities used by a greater favored enemy.

Favored Community

6th-level ranger reature (Replaces Natural Explorer improvement)

At 6th level, the urban ranger forms a bond with a community. This grants you the following benefits when inside this favored community:

  • You gain a +2 on initiative rolls
  • You have advantage on Perception, Stealth, and Survival skill checks.

An urban ranger traveling through his favored community leaves no trail and cannot be tracked (although he may leave a trail if he so desires).

For the purposes of this ability, a community is any settlement consisting of 100 or more individuals. The community may be larger than this minimum. Outlying farms, fields, and houses are not considered part of a community.

This feature may be taken again at 10th level, replacing the Natural Explorer improvement, to select another favored community.

Fleet of Foot

8th-level ranger feature (Replaces Land’s Stride)

Beginning at 8th level, you can use the Dash action as a bonus action on your turn.

Push Through

8th-level ranger feature (Replaces Land’s Stride)

Starting at 8th level, moving through nonmagical difficult terrain costs you no extra movement. In addition, you can move through the space occupied by local citizens as if they were allies. This does not apply to creatures intent on harming you. Areas that are enchanted or magically manipulated to impede motion, however, still affect you.

In addition, you have advantage on saving throws against plants that are magically created or manipulated to impede movement, such those created by the entangle spell.

Blend In

10th-level ranger feature (Replaces Natural Explorer improvement)

At 10th level, you can cast Disguise Self as a bonus action, when inside your favored community. In addition to this, when a creature uses its action to discern that you are disguised, it must succeed on an Intelligence (Investigation) against your Dexterity (Stealth) roll instead of your spell save DC.

This does not expend a spell slot, but you cannot use this feature again until you finish a short or long rest.

Is this Leanan sídhe homebrew race balanced?

I’m wondering if this race is balanced or not. I appreciate all criticism. Here are the traits:

  • Darkvision: You have superior vision in dark and dim conditions. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.
  • Fey: Your creature typ is fey rather than humanoid.
  • Otherworldly Inspiration: You have 4 Otherworldly Inspiration dice, each one of which is a d6. You regain all dice when you finnish a long rest.
  • Fey Charm: As an action you can force a creature to make a Wisdom saving throw. If the creature fails, it becomes charmed by you for one minute, during which you have to Concentrate as if on a spell. The spell ends early if you or any of your allies deal damage to the creature. While charmed in this way, a creature can do nothing but use its movement to approach you in a safe manner. It stops moving when it’s 5 feet away from you, instead it just stares at you and listens to your voice. Using this ability costs you two Otherworldly Inspiration dice.
  • Dark Muse: As a reaction when a creature that can hear you makes an ability check, you can roll one of your Otherworldly Inspiration dice and add the number to the results of the Creature’s ability check. The Otherworldly Inspiration dice rolled is expended.

Other Form – Is this ability balanced?

The following ability becomes available to warlocks with a specific patron at level 3:

Other Form

By sacrificing one spell slot, the warlock gains the innate ability to exchange their current form for their other form. In so doing, their current form becomes their other form, and vice versa. Their current form, whichever that might be, is always their true form. The warlock’s other form must be the same size as their current form, and is the same kind of creature as their current form, but the appearance of the other form is otherwise freely changeable.

This ability can be used twice, and then requires a long rest before it’s used again.

The other form is fixed, but can be changed in communion with the warlock’s patron. In communion with their patron, the warlock can also renounce their other form to regain a spell slot.

Is my homebrew melee Eldritch Blast cantrip balanced?


Intent

A complaint I often hear about Warlocks is that, unless they choose Pact of the Blade/Hexblade, they are effectively pidgeon-holed into playing a caster that sits in the back, blasting foes from afar.

This homebrew cantrip attempts to remedy that by providing an alternative to Eldritch Blast that is nonetheless compatible with Eldritch Invocations, such that the fantasy of a magical melee warrior is attainable while being usable with a variety of Patrons and Pact Boons, all the while utilizing the full breadth of customization that Eldritch Invocations provide.

Variant: Eldritch Blade

Warlock 1st level feature.

Whenever you learn Eldritch Blast, you can choose to instead learn Eldritch Blade. This cantrip is considered the same cantrip as Eldritch Blast, with the modifications listed below.

Eldritch Blade

Evocation cantrip
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: 5 feet
Components: S, M (a hilt or hilt-like rod worth at least 1 GP)
Duration: 1 minute

You create a blade of crackling magical energy in your hand that lasts for the duration or until the spell is cast again. As part of casting this spell, and as an action for the remaining duration, you can strike at a creature or object within range. Perform a melee spell attack against the target. On a hit, the target takes 1d10 force damage, or 2d6 force damage if you hold the blade in both hands while making the attack.

The magical blade emanates from the hilt used to cast this spell, or wraps around an existing blade if it is attached to the hilt. Using an existing blade confers no additional benefits to the attacks made with this spell. If you release the hilt, the spell ends.

This spell magically amplifies the fervor of your attacks, such that you can attack more than once with this spell when you reach higher levels: two attacks at 5th level, three attacks at 11th level, and four attacks at 17th level. You can direct the attack at the same target or at different ones. Make a separate attack roll for each attack.

Eldritch Invocations

Any Eldritch Invocation with a prerequisite of Eldritch Blast affects Eldritch Blade as if it were the same cantrip. The following Eldritch Invocations have their effects replaced:

Eldritch Spear: when you cast Eldritch Blade, its range is 10 feet.

Grasp of Hadar: Once on each of your turns before attacking with Eldritch Blade, you can magically teleport to an unoccupied space within 5 feet of the target of your attack, provided you can see the creature, and the creature is within 15 feet of you.

Analysis

The characteristics and usage of Eldritch Blade closely follow those of Eldritch Blast, except that the spell can only be cast at melee range.

Components: the hilt component is given a gold cost so that the component cannot be replaced with a spellcasting focus. This is mainly to evoke imagery of a fantasy lightsaber blade that is emitted from the hilt. Additionally, the spell’s wording allows the user to use an existing weapon as the spellcasting component, as if using magic to fuel their attacks. The magical blade cannot be given to an ally, so there’s no room for cheesing the system by giving your allies magically creating blades.

Damage: in order to compensate for the significant reduction of power associated with Eldritch Blade’s reduced range, I’ve given it the option to be wielded with two hands for moderately increased damage. This increase is deliberately similar to the increase in damage from a longsword to a greatsword.

Eldritch Invocations: Eldritch Spear normally provides an ~2x improvement to the range of Eldritch Blast, so I’ve followed the same logic. Grasp of Hadar is more tricky; within 5 feet, you cannot pull a target any closer to yourself, so instead I’ve changed the wording such that a user can move themselves closer to a distant target. The increased utility of teleportation for escaping grapples comes at the cost of reduced safety, as the ability can only be used to teleport next to the target.

How is this different from Pact of the Blade/Hexblade? For starters, this option allows Warlocks to choose a different Pact Boon. This cantrip uses the Warlock’s spellcasting ability, meaning that it uses Charisma for attack rolls. This cantrip is still a spell, so it has none of the benefits of magic weapons (i.e. bonuses on attack and damage rolls, additional effects on hit, etc.), and none of the benefits of Pact of the Blade like its associated Eldritch Invocations.

Conclusion

Is this homebrew spell balanced? I’ve combed through the list of Eldritch Invocations and I’m confident that I’ve identified any potentially strange interactions. Thank you for reading.

Is this Void Themed Sorcerer Subclass Reasonably Balanced?


Introduction:

I’m trying to make a Sorcerer subclass that has a Lovecraftian/Far Realm theme. I tried to balance it around Shadow, Divine Soul, Storm and the Abberant/Psionic Mind UA. (I realize that is probably over-tuned some) I’m hoping this isn’t overly powerful though probably on the higher end of the spectrum. I’ll be play testing it in about a month give or take a week.

Design

One of the things I wanted in this subclass was an extended spell list as I feel, having played a sorcerer in Pathfinder 1e and DnD 5e, that the limited spells known combined with everyone being a spontaneous caster shoehorn Sorcerers a bit too much into glass cannons with no real versatility.

I also wanted a unique feel and theme without stepping on the other subclasses’ toes.

The Subclass

Level 1:

  • Dark Vision – 120 Feet

This is right from Shadow Sorcery

  • Expanded Spell List:

These spells are granted as you gain the appropriate level in this subclass to cast them. They are gained automatically and do not count towards spells known.

Spell Name           Spell Level        Class Level Arms of Hadar          level 1            level 1 Darkness               level 2            level 3 Hunger of Hadar        level 3            level 5 Shadow of Moil         level 4            level 7 Synaptic Static        level 5            level 9 

I’m not too thrilled with Synaptic Static but couldn’t find a better thematic spell from PHB or XtGE. I thought about giving Dimension Door at 9 but it made the wording clunky and I felt a linear progression made more sense.

Level 6:

  • You can see through magical darkness granted through this sub class’ features.

I’m unsure of how necessary this is, it might make level 6 too strong.

  • As a bonus action you can create a void tendril to push or pull yourself or another creature 10 feet. If the creature is unwilling, it makes a strength save against your spell save DC. This ability has a range of 30 feet.

I don’t know how powerful the ability to yank friendlies out of Attack of Opportunity range is. This might need to be yourself or hostile creatures.

Level 14:

  • You are immune to fear effects and can cast spells with a range of touch up to a range of 30 feet.

As above I am unsure how necessary this is, I mainly threw it in for the thematic elements.

  • As a reaction you may spend 2 sorcery points, you are under the effect of blur until the start of your next turn. This does not require concentration.

I originally had levels 6 and 14 switched, but I want the core of the class to be the tendril and not the blur. The downside being a lack of sorcery point dumps for 14 levels.

Level 18:

  • As a bonus action you may spend 6 sorcery points to manifest the void for 1 minute. While under this effect you gain the following:

    • You have a Hover Speed equal to your movement speed.
    • You may use your void tendrils up to three times as a bonus action and when this ability is activated. If the target fails their save they take 2D6 force damage.
    • Magical Darkness is centered around you with a radius of 15 feet. Any number of creatures in range you designate when this ability is activated can see through this darkness.

Question

Is this balanced as a Sorcerer subclass and is the wording and intent of each feature clear and in line with officially published materials?

I had the flavor of the class in mind while designing this and really wanted the expanded spell list. I am completely unsure of how the tendrils, especially at level 18, are balanced as they work a bit differently from published materials I am aware of.

What bonus would be balanced against a restriction on a changeling powers?

I am playing as a changeling in a new campaign where every officially published races are accepted. We told the DM the races and classes we wanted to play in advance and he was OK with it. However, during the first session, he said that my changeling will only be able to change their appearance once per day, during a long rest.

I am going to try to negotiate a bonus in exchange for this restriction.
There are two options I’d like to propose, but don’t know which one would be fair :

  1. The actor feat – So even if my character can’t change very often, they are very good at it.

  2. Unsettling visage, from the UA version of the changeling – It’s in theme and could be fun to describe.

I like "Actor" more, but would it be balanced to get it at first level?

(Please tell me if there are any mistake, English isn’t my first language)

Is my modified ‘Scent’ ability balanced?

I am homebrewing a race based on the Skeksis for DnD 5e. The canonical Skeksis have a strong sense of smell, so I am using this as a racial trait. I looked up references but could only find a modified version of ability from 3.5 DnD and a very ambiguous trait for 5e. I took part in the 3.5 ability and modified it. The race has no other racial traits currently unless the ability score modifiers are counted.

The original ability:

Scent. This extraordinary special quality allows a creature to detect approaching enemies, sniff out hidden foes, and track by sense of smell. Creatures with the scent sense can identify familiar odors just as humans do familiar sights. Creatures that would have this sense normally have Keen Smell trait or similar feature such as the Wolf, but it is ultimately up to the DM to grant this sense to a creature. The Scent sense will grant the creature the ability to do the following below:

Detection. The creature with the Scent sense can detect other creatures within 30 feet by sense of smell. If upwind, the range increases to 60 feet; if downwind, it drops to 15 feet.

Strong scents, such as smoke or rotting garbage, can be detected at twice the ranges noted above. Overpowering scents, such as skunk musk or troglodyte stench can be detected at triple the ranges noted above.

When a creature detects a scent, the exact location of the source is not revealed, only that its presence is somewhere within range. Whenever the creature with scent comes within 5 feet of the source, the creature pinpoints the source’s location.

My modified version:

Keen Smell. You can detect other creatures within 30 feet by sense of smell and determine what race they are solely by smell. You cannot detect how many there are. If upwind, the range increases to 60 feet; if downwind, it drops to 15 feet. When a creature detects a scent, the exact location of the source is not revealed, only that its presence is somewhere within range.

Full statblock:

Skeksis get +2 to constitution,

Young adult / ≤300: +1 dexterity

Adult / ≥500: +1 intelligence, +1 strength

Elder / ≥700: +2 intelligence, -1 dex.

Skeksis lifespan: 900 years, skeksis reach maturity by 250 years

Skeksis naming conventions and titling. Skeksis names are always structured with Skek-, followed by the suffix that gives their name individuality. Skeksis names are saved for formal situations, close friends or to clarify a certain individual who has the same job or title as others. Skeksis refer to each other by their profession or social standing. For example, a sheepherder would be referred to as ‘Shepherd’, a Skeksis with no job or home could be called ‘Lazier’, or ‘Vagrant’ respectively. Child Skeksis are typically called ‘Youngling’. Skeksis have four arms however most Skeksis only use the larger pair causing the secondaries to become atrophied unless exercised regularly.

Language. Altho they do have their own native language, Urske, it has become a nearly dead language as Skeksis have switched over to speaking Common as a first language. Only linguists and a few others still know or even use Urske. 

Alignment. Skeksis are known for many things, however, a kind and generous nature is not one of them. Skeksis, while not wholly inclined towards evil, have found themselves to be such as a result of their selfish nature. However, most Skeksis tend toward neutral. Skeksis are quite inclined towards lawfulness due to their tight-knit societies however some who are more distant from Skeksis society may be neutral.

Speed. Due to their short legs, most Skeksis shuffle to get around. However, those who have trained their legs with lots of exercises can boast a faster gait to get around. Base walking speed is 25. 
 Size. Skeksis are 6 feet tall on average.

Is this Dryad race balanced when compared to officially published races?

In a similar vein to these two questions, I’ve made my own Dryad race, but without subraces for right now. I based the very basics off of tieflings, but replaced the damage resistance with the Speech of Beast and Leaf and Fey traits, as well as modifying the spells gotten in the tiefling three-tier spell progression; finally, I modified the languages known, and the +1 to Int went to Wis instead.

Is this race balanced when compared to officially published races?

If it is too weak, I was considering making the Speech of Beast and Leaf trait just make the dryad always under the effect of Speak with Animals spell, and grant a similar effect for plants. If they were still too weak, I was also considering adding either Charm Person or some other charm effect. If they were too strong, I’d get rid of one or two of the Forest Legacy spells.

Sapling Dryad

Speed. 30 ft.
Ability Bonuses. CHA 2, WIS 1
Age. Dryads mature much slower than most other races, and live much longer. They achieve maturity at age 100 and may live indefinitely if they are not killed. Most Saplings are between 50 and 200 years old.
Alignment. Dryads generally do not care for much outside their forests, but those that do are usually Good aligned.
Size. Dryads are usually slightly shorter than most humans. Your size is medium.
Darkvision. Accustomed to twilit forests and the night sky, you have superior vision in dark and dim conditions. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.
Speech of Beast and Leaf. You have the ability to communicate in a limited manner with beasts and plants. They can understand the meaning of your words, and can respond by communicating simple ideas.
Forest Legacy. You know the Druidcraft cantrip. Once you reach 3rd level, you can cast the entangle spell as a 2nd-level spell; you must finish a long rest in order to cast the spell again using this trait. Once you reach 5th level, you can also cast the pass without trace spell; you must finish a long rest in order to cast the spell again using this trait. Charisma is your spellcasting ability for these spells.
Fey. You have two creature types: humanoid and fey. Because of this, you have advantage on saving throws against being charmed, and magic can’t put you to sleep.
Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common, Elvish, and Sylvan.

Is my adaptation of the Battle Master as a Wizard subclass balanced relative to other Wizard subclasses and to the original Battle Master?


Background Motivation

I wanted to create a subclass for Wizard that uses an expendable die resource to augment its magic and benefit its allies, similar to how the Battle Master Fighter expends superiority dice to fuel maneuvers which augments its attacks and benefit its allies.

Design Process

The following were some significant steps and motivations in my design process.

  • I called the subclass the School of Pedagogy because, thematically, a Wizard of this subclass is an academic who studies magic at a theoretical level. I called the equivalent of Battle Master maneuvers “theorems” for the Pedagogy Wizard and the equivalent of superiority dice “savant dice.”
  • I evolved the Pedagogy concept from the Unearthed Arcana Lore Master and School of Invention, but almost nothing from those inspirations remains.
  • I ported the Battle Master subclass features (at 3rd, 7th, 10th, 15th, and 18th Fighter levels) into the chassis of the Wizard (at 2nd, 6th, 10th, and 14th Wizard levels), trying to keep a similar pacing of improvements.
  • I reduced the die size progression and the utility/skill features for the Pedagogy Wizard to include only d8 and d10 savant dice to account for Wizards generally being more powerful than Fighters at higher levels and for Wizards generally having more skills.
  • I ported many of the Battle Master maneuvers directly into theorems with minimal changes to apply the benefits to spells and magical effects. However, not every maneuver was sensible to port, so I excluded some. Then I created original theorems to fill unique magical needs that exist for a Wizard but not for a Fighter.
  • I compared the resulting theorems to all subclass features of other Wizard subclasses to avoid stepping on their toes. Some features and theorems are inspired by class/subclass features from other classes, in which case I tried to avoid impeding on those as well. I specifically avoided duplicating any Sorcerer Metamagic features.
  • For wording all theorems that add or subtract a die on an attack, check, or save, I tried to use wording identical to that used in Battle Master maneuvers, Bardic Inspiration, and the bless and bane spells: if the intent is that you can add/subtract before or after the roll is resolved, it’s explicitly stated; otherwise, you add it when you make the roll.
  • I iterated the subclass many times using feedback from several other DM’s. We will be playtesting the subclass for two Wizard characters in two campaigns (one where I am the DM and one where I play the Wizard), but it hasn’t made it to the table as of this posting.

Text of the Subclass (version 1.0)

The following is the result of my design effort.

Arcane Expertise

At 2nd level, you gain proficiency in the Arcana skill if you aren’t already proficient in it, and your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses Arcana.

Magical Savant

When you choose this school at 2nd level, you learn magical theorems that are fueled by special dice called savant dice.

Theorems. You learn three theorems of your choice, which are detailed under “Theorems” below. Many theorems enhance a spell or other magical effect in some way. You can use only one theorem per effect.

You learn two additional theorems of your choice at 6th, 10th, and 14th level. Each time you learn new theorems, you can also replace one theorem you know with a different one.

Savant Dice. You have four savant dice, which are d8s. A savant die is expended when you use it. You regain all of your expended savant dice when you finish a short or long rest.

You gain another savant die at 6th level and one more at 14th level.

Theorems

The theorems are presented in alphabetical order.

Applied Studies

When you make an Intelligence (Arcana, History, Nature, or Religion) check, you can expend one savant die to add it to the check. Alternatively, when you or a friendly creature who can see or hear you makes an Intelligence (Investigation) check, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to add it to the check before or after making the check, but before any effects of the check are applied.

Beguiling Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Wisdom saving throw against being charmed or frightened, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially beguiling and hard to ignore. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the condition.

Damping Defense

When a creature damages you with a weapon attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to reduce the damage by the number you roll on your savant die + your Constitution modifier.

Distracting Spell

When you hit a creature with a spell attack, you can expend one savant die to distract that creature, giving your allies an opening. You add the savant die to the attack’s damage roll. The next attack roll against the target by an attacker other than you has advantage if the attack is made before the start of your next turn.

Dual Strike

When you cast a spell with a duration of Instantaneous and it deals damage to a creature on your turn, you can use a bonus action to direct one of your companions to strike in tandem. When you do so, choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you and expend one savant die. That creature can immediately use its reaction to make one weapon attack against the same target, adding the savant die to its attack roll.

Elemental Flux

When you cast a spell that deals acid, cold, fire, lightning, or thunder damage, you can expend one savant die and choose one of the spell’s damage types from that list to substitute for another type from that list for the spell’s duration. The first time you roll damage for the spell using the substituted type, add the savant die to the damage roll.

Focusing Oration

When a friendly creature that can see or hear you misses with an attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to refocus that creature’s efforts. Add the savant die to the attack roll, possibly changing the outcome.

Galvanizing Oration

When a friendly creature that can see or hear you makes a saving throw to end an ongoing effect on itself or to maintain concentration, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to add it to the saving throw.

Maneuvering Spell

When you cast a spell with an area of effect, you can expend one savant die to direct one of your comrades to exit the area. Choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you in the area. Before the spell takes effect, that creature can use its reaction to move up to its speed, adding the savant die to its AC until it stops moving.

Mental Agility

When you roll initiative at the start of combat, you can expend one savant die to add it to the roll. When you use this theorem and aren’t incapacitated, you can’t be surprised on your first turn in combat.

Merciful Spell

When you reduce a creature to 0 hit points with a spell and the target isn’t killed outright, you can expend one savant die to hold back some of the spell’s energy and merely knock the target out. The target falls unconscious and is stable. You gain temporary hit points equal to the savant die roll + your Wisdom modifier.

Precision Spell

When you make a spell attack against a creature, you can expend one savant die to add it to the attack roll. You can use this theorem before or after making the attack roll, but before any effects of the attack are applied.

Reactive Cantrip

When a creature misses you with a melee attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to cast a damaging cantrip that targets only that creature and has a duration of Instantaneous. Add the savant die to the cantrip’s damage roll.

Stirring Oration

When you cast a spell with verbal components on your turn, you can use a bonus action and expend one savant die to encourage one of your companions with an insightful speech woven into your spellcasting. Choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you. That creature gains temporary hit points equal to the savant die roll + your Charisma modifier.

Swift Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Dexterity saving throw, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially swift and hard to avoid. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the spell.

Tough Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Constitution saving throw, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially tough and hard to withstand. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the spell. This theorem can’t hinder a Constitution saving throw made to maintain concentration.

Expeditious Research

Starting at 6th level, you can use the Search action as a bonus action.

Improved Magical Savant

At 10th level, your savant dice turn into d10s.

Timely Epiphany

Starting at 14th level, when you roll initiative and have no savant dice remaining, you regain one savant die.

Question

Is this Wizard School of Pedagogy balanced relative to other Wizard subclasses and to the original Fighter Battle Master that inspired it? In other words, can the School of Pedagogy coexist with those other subclasses as a useful, distinct, and coequal option without impinging on their design? Things to watch for…

  • Flawed language with ambiguity or unintended consequences.
  • Features that are not level-comparable with similar features from other classes/subclasses.
  • Features granting benefits that are too powerful relative to existing options.
  • Features that are game-breaking within the game’s existing design.
  • Features that are so niche or unhelpful they would never be chosen or used.

I am not at all concerned with whether the Pedagogy Wizard seems thematically or mechanically similar to the Sorcerer, so any similarity between the concept of theorems and of metamagic isn’t considered to be infringing on the use case of Sorcerers for purposes of my question, unless a theorem directly replicates a particular Sorcerer metamagic option.

(To the best of my ability, I’ve followed the recommendations on Meta for how to present a homebrew balancing question. I’m happy to accommodate actionable suggestions for improvement of the question. However, if I need to iterate the subclass design again after reviewing the answers, that will be done in a separate question. Finally, sorry for the wall of text. I hope it’s easy to follow.)

Is my ‘Magical Boost’ trait balanced? [closed]

I want to create a homebrew playable race called Fools. Essentially the idea is court jesters but as a race. They have bright, multicolored skin. I want them to have the abilities of the original Fool character in my short story, but I’m afraid they might be too overpowered and/or unbalanced. I have put the current stat block for Fools in the quotes below.

Language. Fools have a language unique to their race, however, they adopt the most spoken language of their surroundings. You speak Foolish, and any language of your choosing.

I believe this is fine as having the choice of a second language is a common trait.

Alignment. Fools are rule-breakers at their core. They are almost always chaotically aligned. Fools are a very widespread and variable race, having members be good, evil, and everything in between.

Again, I’m very sure about this.

Speed. 25.

Halflings and dwarves have a speed of 25. My fools’ size range matches those of halflings and dwarves, so again, this is good as is.

Size. Any given Fool can range in height from less than three feet tall up to just over five feet.

This plays into Fools being variable. No need for change.

Links to the Arcane. Fools are notorious for their innate ability to sense magic. You get +2 to any perception check regarding magic.

This I’m not so sure about. I certainly want Fools to have some innate link to magic and I feel this ability is a good way to show it.

Ability Score Increase. Your dexterity score increases by 1.

Fools are generally very nimble, so I feel this fits.

Magical Boost. You can move ten feet in any direction on your turn. This is an Action. If you do not use this ability again next turn or end you turn on something, you begin to fall back to the ground five feet per turn.

This is the trait I am least sure about. I’m not sure if I should make it more or less powerful. Or if I should extend the range that they can move on their turn.

Is my race, as it currently is, balanced? What changes should I make? What should I add or remove?