Does the Zealot Barbarian’s Divine Fury apply multiple times if you focus the same target?

The Path of the Zealot barbarian (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, p. 11) gets the Divine Fury feature at level 3, which states:

At 3rd level, while you’re raging, the first creature you hit on each of your turns with a weapon attack takes extra damage equal to 1d6 + half your barbarian level. The extra damage is necrotic or radiant; you choose the type of damage when you gain this feature.

The RAI intent seems as though it should be the first successful hit to a creature on your turn deals an additional 1d6 damage, but it doesn’t seem as explicit as Sneak Attack, which states that it only happens once per turn.

Does Divine Fury truly work the same way as the rogue’s Sneak Attack, or can you proc Divine Fury multiple times if you focus fire?

Are Vengeful Ancestors’ damage-dealing reactions enough to sustain the Barbarian’s rage?

To sustain their rage at the end of their turn, a Barbarian must have attacked a hostile creature since their last turn or must have taken damage since then. [PHB, pg. 48]

In the level 14 feature of the Primal Path of the Ancestral Guardian, "Vengeful Ancestors," the spirits called by the Barbarian’s rage may do force damage to a hostile creature. Mechanically, the Barbarian is using their reaction to cause this damage. [XGtE, pg. 10]

Is the fact that the Barbarian is using their reaction to cause damage to a hostile creature enough to sustain their rage? Or is this insufficient because the damage is not being caused directly by the Barbarian?

Why do we call the class “Barbarians” instead of “Berserks” or “Berserkers”?

This is a history-of-gaming question, and it has to do with the name choice between Barbarian and Berserkers. Due to the race-and-class mixing and matching of many different gaming systems, you can get combinations of barbarians with very non-barbaric races. Examples could include: “High Elf Barbarian” and “Gnome Barbarian.” On the surface, these combinations seem unusual but otherwise OK. It gets worse when you grab a dictionary.

According to Merriam-Webster:

Barbarian:

1: of or relating to a land, culture, or people alien and usually believed to be inferior to another land, culture, or people

2: lacking refinement, learning, or artistic or literary culture

Berserk:

1: an ancient Scandinavian warrior frenzied in battle and held to be invulnerable

2: one whose actions are recklessly defiant

If you look at the features of a “barbarian” class, in almost any system, you notice that they align better with the definition of a Berserk (or Berserker). This is reinforced when you read about berserkers in norse sagas. Furthermore, if you look at the linguistic roots of barbarians, it was used to refer to anyone who was not of a particular culture.

Why do we call these classes “Barbarians” instead of “Berserks” or “Berserkers”?

Would a zealot barbarian’s divine fury trigger during an opportunity attack?

The Path of the Zealot barbarian (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, p. 11) gets the Divine Fury feature at level 3, which states:

At 3rd level, while you’re raging, the first creature you hit on each of your turns with a weapon attack takes extra damage equal to 1d6 + half your barbarian level. The extra damage is necrotic or radiant; you choose the type of damage when you gain this feature.

Does it work like the Rogue’s Sneak attack, in that it can trigger on opportunity attacks, since it’s a different turn? Or does the "on each of your turns" bit make it not work.

Is it possible to use warlock’s Hideous Blow in barbarian’s rage?

According to the Complete Arcane book, warlock invocations are not spells. Barbarian rage description in PHB1 says:

While raging, a barbarian cannot use any Charisma-, Dexterity-, or Intelligence-based skills (except for Balance, Escape Artist, Intimidate, and Ride), the Concentration skill, or any abilities that require patience or concentration, nor can he cast spells or activate magic items that require a command word, a spell trigger (such as a wand), or spell completion (such as a scroll) to function. He can use any feat he has except Combat Expertise, item creation feats, and metamagic feats.

So, if invocations are not spells – can I use it in rage? If they are spells can I just multiclass into Rage Mage from Complete Warrior handbook? In the other words invocations are arcane spells or not?

Do Kellid barbarians from Numeria have a typical / trademark weapon?

I am going to play the Iron Gods Adventure Path soon and I am rolling a Kellid tribesman.

I’d like to be as faithful to the existing lore as possible, using some traditional weapon, but I have no idea where to find a list of those without finding spoilers for the adventure.

My research:

I have been told that Numerian -hunters- use spears, shortspears, javelins or thrown clubs. There’s a regional trait that improves these four weapons (all belonging to the thrown and tribal group, but notably not including thrown axes or daggers).

While playing the Pathfinder: Kingmaker videogame, I have seen people from the Tiger Lords tribe use greatswords.

Of course I expect a large number of NPCs of that ethnicity in Iron Gods and in the Kingmaker AP, which I should refrain from reading even if I had the chance.

Can Barbarian’s Rage ability break the Charmed condition?

Can a Barbarian enter a Rage on his turn in combat if he’s charmed by Charm Person, or similar spells?

Last week during one of my games, our DM had a Cambion use a charm on the Barbarian, which he failed the saving throw and was ‘charmed’.

On his turn, he used his bonus action to enter a rage and ‘break’ the charm. The DM didn’t agree on this. Who is right? The Barbarian then continued on to attack with his normal action.

Does the Sacred Kin barbarian’s Supernatural Fury feature replace the Rage feature entirely?

This question is about the Supernatural Fury feature of the Path of the Sacred Kin barbarian subclass from Xanathar’s Lost Notes to Everything Else (a third-party product by the DMs Guild Adepts).

The Supernatural Fury feature states:

At 3rd level, you can focus on the magic in your blood, allowing you to concentrate your rage into the ancient magic of your bloodline and enter a Supernatural Fury. You gain the ability to cast and concentrate on spells, even while raging, at the expense of your physical resistances.

When you enter your Supernatural Fury and you aren’t wearing heavy armor, the following benefits replace the benefits of the Rage feature:

  • You gain a bonus to your AC equal to your Strength modifier (minimum of +1).
  • You have advantage on Constitution checks and saving throws made to maintain concentration on a spell.
  • You have resistance to magical damage and are immune to the damage type you chose from your Ancestral Origin.

Your Supernatural Fury lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you’re knocked unconscious or if your turn ends and you haven’t attacked a hostile creature, cast a spell, or taken damage since your last turn. You can end your Supernatural Fury on your turn as a bonus action.

Does this mean the Sacred Kin barbarian can choose between entering a “regular” rage and a Supernatural Fury? Or can he (from Level 3 on) only gain the benefits from Supernatural Fury, because it completely replaces the “old” rage he used on Level 1 and 2?

What does the Death Ward spell do when a Zealot Barbarian’s Rage Beyond Death feature ends while they have three failed Death Saving Throws?

The death ward spell states:

[…] If the spell is still in effect when the target is subjected to an effect that would kill it instantaneously without dealing damage, that effect is instead negated against the target, and the spell ends.

One example of such an effect would be failing a third death saving throw. Ordinarily you would die immediately after failing your third death saving throw but this is not the case for the Zealot Barbarian currently Raging Beyond Death:

You still must make death saving throws, and you suffer the normal effects of taking damage while at 0 hit points. However, if you would die due to failing death saving throws, you don’t die until your rage ends, and you die then only if you still have 0 hit points

So what happens if the Barbarian has three failed death saves and then their Rage ends?
What instantaneously killing effect is the Barbarian being subjected to?
What exactly is negated by death ward?
Is the third death saving throw removed?

Does a barbarian’s rage end if they are trying to attack an invisible creature they don’t know the location of?

The barbarian rage ability includes this rule stating when it will end:

Your rage lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you are knocked unconscious or if your turn ends and you haven’t attacked a hostile creature since your last turn or taken damage since then.

What happens if the barbarian sees an enemy turn invisible during a battle and begins wildly swinging their weapon at seemingly empty air? From the point of view of the barbarian the enemy might be in the location they are trying to attack. Would that be enough to continue their rage, or would they need to actually hit their enemy or be certain of their location before attacking?