How can a PC become more draconic?

Long story short, the frail, ancient 7th lvl wizard in the party I DM is actually a dragon who is slowly remembering his past and the dragon council’s curse that turned him into a human. He has learned his lesson over the years, and will be allowed to become a dragon once more when he is level 17 and can cast True Polymorph.

However, he wants there to be a sort of transition between what he is now and the adult dragon he will be able to become.

In the core rules (MM, DMG, and PH), what options are there to make a wizard PC seem more draconic or have dragon-like abilities? I’m especially looking for things between 7th and 17th level. Items, spells, and potions are all viable. I am a DM that allows UA, pending my approval.

For reasons of his own, the PC does not really want to multiclass, though we have discussed it as an option.

We are far enough in the campaign for the PCs to be known throughout the local kingdom and mildly inconvenience one of 3 major villians who are competing for power. They have a long way to go before saving the world, though.

I’m not worried about him stealing the spotlight, for the record.

In D&D 5e, does the superiority dice from the new superior technique fighting style become a d8 if you are a battlemaster? [duplicate]

I was just wondering if it functions the same as the martial adept feat’s dice, which do become d8s as confirmed by Jeremy Crawford. https://twitter.com/jeremyecrawford/status/1250815333331382274?lang=en

Can a PC become a god / powerful celestial?

This recent question seemed to be received well (Can a PC become a Devil?), so I thought I’d ask this one which I’ve been wondering about for a while.

Is it possible for a PC to ascend to godhood? A few options I’ve explored is becoming immortal through one of a few means, and getting plane shift spell to go to the god plane.

Specifically, I’m looking to gain celestial like status, not change creature type.

When does a .com domain become available after it expires? (With status clientTransferProhibited)

the domain I want is taken and according to ICANN it expires on 2021-01-05. The only status it has is "clientTransferProhibited". I am not sure how to interpret this domain status… Does this status prohibit me from getting the domain once it has expired? And can I acquire the domain as soon as it expires according to the expiry date on ICANN?

If I attack with the Fathomless’ tentacles on a creature that is unaware of where I am, will it become aware of my warlock?

Have been playing a Fathomless Warlock recently, and have found the way the tentacles function outside of attacking and moving it is somewhat vague. If I use the tentacle to attack someone who doesn’t know I’m there, will they become aware of my warlock? I assume this is up to the DM but my DM wanted to try and reach out first.

Are Ogres allowed to become Priests of Vaprak?

The Complete Book of Humanoids allows for PC Ogres with a level limit of 3 in Shaman and no other divine spellcasting class allowed.

Monster Mythology provides details for Vaprak’s (the god of Ogres) priesthood, with a level limit of 3 for Shamans and a level limit of 7 for Speciality Priests.

My understanding of Specialty Priests is they are something that can be taken instead of Cleric. Is my understanding of Specialty Priests flawed or is there something else RAW that addresses this?

Monster Mythology additionally states in the intro that other races can become a Specialty Priest for any given god, but if they are not the god’s race they have the same level limit as the Shaman. It seems clear the intention was to allow Ogres to get to level 7 Priests under Vaprak, which is how I’m ruling it in my game, but I’m hoping to find something RAW to further justify that decision.

What does it mean to become lost?

The DMG (p111-112) suggests that the party’s navigator make a Survival check to avoid becoming lost:

If the Wisdom (Survival) check succeeds, the party travels in the desired direction without becoming lost. If the check fails, the party inadvertently travels in the wrong direction and becomes “lost.” The party’s navigator can repeat the check after the party spends 1d6 hours trying to get back on course.

(emphasis mine, to clarify to those who are confused that going “in the wrong direction” and becoming “lost” are independent of one another)

So, as this reads, three distinctive things happen if you fail the check:

  1. You travel in a random direction.
  2. You become lost.
  3. You can make a new Survival check every 1d6 hours to stop being lost.

I completely understand points 1 and 3, but it doesn’t mean anything without understanding point 2. For example, let’s say I’m using the UA Ranger. I’m not able to become lost by nonmagical means, but since there doesn’t seem to be a RAW definition, that might mean any (or all) of the following:

  • You don’t travel in a random direction when you fail the check.
  • You don’t have to wait 1d6 hours to get back on track.
  • You have traveled in the right direction, but you don’t know where you are geographically.
  • You know exactly how to get from point A to point B, even if you don’t have a map and/or you’ve never been there.
  • You can’t trigger random Terrain Encounters (as in Chapter 2 of Out of the Abyss) because they suggest that you don’t know where you’re going.
  • Thick fog, rain, darkness, and other nonmagical elements can’t keep you from finding the path.
  • You don’t make a check at all, and you benefit from all of the above.
  • Maybe something else that I haven’t thought of.

Which of these options are true? Why? I will accept an answer that confirms and/or denies all of the assumptions listed above.

What happens if you become frightened of yourself?

You might be wondering how this could happen apart from a contrived scenario of casting a spell like cause fear on yourself (which is technically allowed). Turns out, it can happen by interacting with the local wildlife of Icewind Dale.

The Crag Cat has this ability:

Spell Turning. The cat has advantage on saving throws against any spell that targets only the cat (not an area). If the cat’s saving throw succeeds and the spell is of 7th level or lower, the spell has no effect on the cat and instead targets the caster.

So I cast cause fear on a Crag Cat, it passes the save, and then I fail on my save. I become the target of my own cause fear, which means I am now frightened of myself.

The frightened condition says:

  • A frightened creature has disadvantage on ability checks and attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight.
  • The creature can’t willingly move closer to the source of its fear.

Do either of these conditions apply in some way while I am frightened of myself?

You might be thinking, "why not ust drop concentration and end the effect?" Right, that would work, if the caster thought to do that. When this scenario played out in my game, the player character who was frightened of himself was so worked up about being frightened of himself he didn’t even think to drop concentration, which I thought was a great narrative expression of the effect. I ruled on the fly that he used all of his movement on his turn to run about wildly, trying to get away from himself, opting to make a quick ruling without spending much time thinking to preserve the tension of the situation. Now that I have had time to think about it, I’m not sure what the correct ruling would be.

Is there a way to become immune to Possession all the time?

I’m going to be running an Eberron game soon, and one of the players has expressed an interest in playing one of the Inspired ‘gone rogue’. Unfortunately, the rules for Possession of the Inspired are … Very much in favor of the Quori.

I can always come up with a custom item, but is there a way to become immune to possession more or less all the time in 3.5? Answers that work from moderate levels are preferred, but anything that works will give me something to work with.

I am looking for pre-existing solutions which are rules legal as a starting point.

Can a living character (IE. Human NPC) become a contruct (IE. Warforged) via a soul/host transfer?

Im making a pseudo doctor character (Player or NPC), and would like to know if I can link a living characters soul to say, a vacant warforged body so that if the entity dies their soul would go into the Warforged and take it over. Is there any spells that can do anything like this in official D&D? If not, do you think something like this would be too outrageous for home-brew? The goal is for the person to retain complete autonomy, so Necromancy is prohibited.