How Liquid Filling Machines Benefit the Paint and Coatings Industry

How Liquid Filling Machines Benefit the Paint and Coatings Industry
Using Filling Machines to Increase Efficiency and Profitability
Liquid fillers are integral to liquid packaging lines, with automated models capable of maximizing efficiency. Without this equipment, the filling process wouldn’t be reliable enough to ensure that no product loss occurs because of inaccurate fill levels.
Technological developments that are creating more automation and computerizing many of the components in filling machines have made them more dependable than ever before, with many of the best models designed to allow for full customization and user friendliness.
One type of liquid filler that can meet the needs of the paint and coatings industry is the net weigh filling machine. Designed to handle products of low to high viscosity, net weigh fillers are ideal for filling liquids in bulk quantities, such as 5-gallon pails, with consistent weight levels for each container.
Net weigh fillers work by using independently timed valves with custom programming through the filler’s computer. They can then fill precise amounts of liquid by gravity into containers, stopping once the liquid reaches the specified weight.
These fillers can fill many different types and sizes of containers, with many of the top models capable of lasting for many years.
What is a Piston Filling Machine?
At Liquid Packaging Solutions, there are a number of different types of filling machines manufactured to handle different product viscosities, different fill sizes and other variations in packaging projects. The piston filling machine can solve many issues for products with particulates or high viscosity liquids, though it can also handle thin and medium viscosity products as well.
As product sits in the hopper, the valve, which sits between the hopper and the nozzle, will be open from the hopper to the cylinder. The piston will begin to withdraw from the cylinder, typically after an operator activates the fill by stepping on a foot switch. As the piston withdraws, product from the hopper will fill the empty cylinder. Once the piston has withdrawn to the desired point, the valve will rotate to allow product to move through the nozzle. At this point the piston push back in to the cylinder and move product through the nozzle and in to the waiting bottles or other containers. This process creates a highly accurate volumetric fill as the interior volume of the cylinder will never change, meaning the volume of product released to the bottles will never change.
The hopper sizes can vary from project to project based on the size of the containers or fills. Not all piston filling machines, and in particular, the automatic piston fillers, will use a hopper from which to pull product. Automatic lines will likely include a tank or pull from a bulk source. The cylinder and piston combination are also available in different sizes to accommodate different projects. The speed with which the piston moves can be adjusted, different piston sizes can be used to meet volume requirements and even multi-piston, automatic filling machines can be designed for use with inline packaging systems. LPS piston fillers allow the operator to adjust the length of the piston stroke, which in turn adjusts the volume of product that is pulled in to the cylider with each fill cycle. This way a single piston size can handle a range of container sizes. While multiple strokes of the piston can also be used for larger fills, at some point the efficiency of using multiple strokes will become low enough that simply changing out the piston for large containers will be the better solution.
The nozzle used on any piston filler will be chosen to meet the needs of the particular project at hand. For instance, a product with large chunks of fruit or vegetables will not work well if a narrow nozzle is used to move product in to the bottles. On the other hand, a very large nozzle will be cumbersome with a small mouthed bottle. There is virtually no limit to the type of nozzles that can be used, including custom manufactured nozzles where special projects are concerned.
Though a simple concept, the piston filler can be an ideal solution for many projects and for liquids thick and thin. Though these machines are known for handling viscous products, in the right circumstances they will handle free-flowing liquids as well. For assistance finding the best type of filling machine for your own packaging project, contact Liquid Packaging Solutions today.
Overflow fillers, gravity fillers, automatic piston filling machine and other liquid fillers all vary in the way that they move product into a bottle or container. However, the automatic versions of these machines almost always have certain features in common. These features are intended to add efficiency, consistency and reliability to the packaging equipment. Below are a few of the most common features of found on Liquid Packaging Solutions’ bottle fillers.
Heavy Duty and Portable Stainless Steel Frame
For consistent and reliable fills, the machine must be stabile throughout the process. The heavy duty stainless steel frame protects against shifting, vibrating and other movement that might effect the volume or the level of the fill, while also avoiding splashes and spills. The stainless steel material is compatible with a vast majority of products, though there are exceptions. When corrosive liquids are run on the machinery, other construction materials may be used for the frame, including HDPE. Ultimately, the material used will be that material which will better extend the useful life of the equipment.
Easy Adjustments From Height to Heads
Many packagers fill more than a single product, or at the very least fill into bottles of multiple sizes and shapes. Changing over from one product or bottle to another means stopping production on the liquid filler. These machines include simple adjustments to minimize downtime and maximize production. Fill heads can typically be moved using simple fingertip adjustment knobs, while power height comes standard on automatic equipment, allowing up and down movement with the flip of a switch. Even auxillary equipment such as power conveyors include knob adjustments or other simple components for railing and other changes. Other adjustments, such as time and delay settings, can easily be made from the operator control panel, discussed in more detail below.

Gravity filling is the simplest filling method. The uncomplicated construction and operation of gravity filling machines permits them to run with a minimum of maintenance. The supply tank (more properly called the filler bowl) is the upper, central part of the machine. Filling stems are attached to the bottom surface of the bowl at each container filling point. A vent tube extends upward into the filler bowl to a point above the liquid level. To begin the filling operation, the container is raised by the platform until it contacts the filling stem. The platform then continues to raise the container against the stem, opening the filling valve. With the filling valve open, the liquid drains into the container. The air in the container flows out trough the vent tube into the space above the liquid in the filler bowl. Although the container becomes filled, the liquid continues to flow in. The excess fluid rises in the vent tube until it reaches the same height as the liquid level in the bowl. Because the vent tube extends above the bowl liquid level, there is no overflow of liquid from the container into the bowl. If the product is foamy, the foam will rise in the vent tube above the liquid level in the bowl. If it is stable foam and will not break down, it will ultimately overflow into the bowl. For this reason, gravity fillers are not often used for foamy products. At the predetermined time after the container is filled, it is lowered from its filling position, closing the filling valve. Liquid left in the filling stem is removed from the vent tube in several ways. For most applications the liquid will fill drain into the next container. For high viscosity (thick) liquids, the vent tube is usually brought out beyond the side or top of the bowl. Here its outer end can be connected to a device that applies pressure or vacuum to the liquid in the tube to assist in the liquid removal. The total differential pressure that allows the fluid to flow is caused by the gravity head pressure in the bowl. This is usually no more than two or three feet of head, or about one psi. On this basis, it can be seen that these fillers will not permit rapid filling of viscous liquids unless they have larger diameter filling stems. To accommodate the stem, the container must also have a large neck opening; otherwise machine modifications have to be made. ElGravity 150×150 Gravity Filling Machine PrinciplesAnother type of gravity filler uses electronics. It consists of a fixed liquid reservoir or bowl with open-end filling stems. The containers are conveyed on the filling line with an intermittent motion, stopping beneath the filling stems. Inside each filling stem is a ball check connected to a long rod. A pencil shaped magnetic block is attached to the top of the rod and passes through a magnetic coil. As the container moves under the stem, it is detected by a sensing device such as a limit switch or electric eye. This device stops the conveyor, and energizes the magnetic coil. The magnetic field causes the magnetic blocks to lift, raising the rod and the ball check from its seat inside the stem. The rate and amount of fill is controlled by the size of the stem orifice and time delay relay connected to the magnetic coil. Because a direct insertion filling tube is not used on this type of gravity filler the filling stem orifice must be smaller than the inside diameter of the container being filled. On small size containers a more positive means for positioning the bottle beneath the filling stem is used. Fill Height Control In addition to controlling fluid flow, control of the filling height is also important. In general filling machines that elevate the container control the fill height from the bottom of the bottle to the liquid level. The rise of the container is positive, and variations in overall container height are compensated for by greater or lesser seal compression. On rising container machines, a compression spring is often built into the tray elevating mechanism. In this case, container height variations are compensated for by the spring, and the fill height is then controlled from the top of the bottle to the liquid level. Controlling the fluid level from the top can be important if the bottle to be filled has square shoulders, because even a slight under fill is noticeable. In rising stem fillers, variation in container height is taken up by the stem itself. It is usually lowered by gravity or light spring pressure, so the fill height is controlled from the top of the bottle to the liquid level. If the product contains a volatile liquid, such as alcohol, control of the fill height is especially important. In this instance, excessive headspace could allow dangerous vapors to form and the bottle would possibly burst if it were stored in a hot warehouse. Therefore, controlling the fill height is an important function of the filling machine. Normally, a fill height tolerance of 1/32″ is acceptable. Container Control There are several devices used to control the containers coming into the filling area. Included are star wheels, worm or screw sorters, and lug chains. They can be used independently or in combination, depending on the type of container, the filling machine, and the product being placed in the container. The majority of all liquid filling machines operate as continuous filling devices. In most applications the machine has a large rotating filling head, which must be constantly supplied with containers. This is accomplished by a continuously running flat top chain conveyor feeding a star wheel or lead screw device. From here the containers are fed into the filling section. Star wheels when used alone separate the containers so they will be properly located beneath the filling stem. They can be made to handle a variety of container designs, although in some cases, the containers may have to be guided into the star wheel to ensure proper separation. Worm sorters are often used to guide containers into a star wheel. They can be short in length and only located near the machine in feed, or they may be full length of the machine’s main conveyor. The amount of container control determines the worm length. In most cases, worm sorters are very much like a wood screw; starting out small in diameter and then increasing to full diameter. A continuous pocket is formed at the root between the raised portion or crest of the thread. This pocket carries the container into its position on the filling machine by a rotating action. Because each container is different in design, worm sorters are usually made for individual applications and are not an “off-the-shelf” item. Lugged chains are normally used with inclined conveyors and semiautomatic filling machines. These machines can be either continuous or intermittent motion devices. The chain lugs are spaced to match the filling nozzles or stems. For example, if the filling stems are on four-inch centers. The chain is adjustable at the drive sprocket for timing purpose only. Position adjustments are usually made by moving the filling heads. Whatever method is used for container control, it is an important part of proper machine operation.

Does a Warlock receive the benefit of their familiar’s Magic Resistance trait?

The Warlock has access to special forms for their find familiar spell through the Pact of the Chain feature. I’m wondering if these special forms, the Quasit, Imp, and Pseudodragon in particular, allow the player character to share the familiar’s Magic Resistance feature. In the Monster Manual each of these creatures has a sidebar that states that the familiar shares its Magic Resistance feature with the companion they are bonded to, but the PHB doesn’t mention this in any of the creatures’ stat blocks.

For example, in the Variant: Pseudodragon Familiar sidebar on page 254 of the MM it says:

“While the pseudodragon is within 10 feet of its companion, the companion shares the pseudodragon’s Magic Resistance trait.”

This feature seems clear in the MM but I’m led to believe that it wasn’t intended for Player Characters since mention of it is absent from the stat blocks in Appendix D of the PHB (pages 307-309).

Would a 3rd level warlock who chose one of these familiar forms through the Pact of the Chain feature benefit from advantage from saving throws from spells and other magical effects due to these special forms, or was this feature only meant for powerful NPCs and enemy spellcasters who had made this link with these familiars themselves?

Can you benefit from Horde Breaker if you attack as part of Booming Blade or Green Flame Blade?

The booming blade and green-flame blade cantrips from the Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide both have the particularity of including a single melee weapon attack as part of their casting.

Several martial abilities, like Extra Attack or the Martial Arts’s bonus attack, do not work with these cantrips because they require the Attack action to be used.

However, the Hunter Ranger’s Horde Breaker ability (which lets you do an additional attack on another target with the same weapon once per turn) only requires an attack with a weapon, not necessarily the Attack action. Therefore, I’m wondering if a Hunter Ranger with Horde Breaker could get that additional-attack-on-different-target-with-same-weapon when using booming blade or green-flame blade.

Can a hasted steel defender benefit from its extra actions?

Haste provides an extra action that can be used to Attack (one weapon Attack only), Dash, Disengage, Hide, or Use an Object.

In combat, the defender shares your initiative count, but it takes its turn immediately after yours. It can move and use its reaction on its own, but the only action it takes on its turn is the Dodge action, unless you take a bonus action on your turn to command it to take another action. That action can be one in its stat block or some other action. If you are incapacitated, the defender can take any action of its choice, not just Dodge.

Can a hasted steel defender benefit from its extra actions? Or is limited to one action total?

  • For example can a steel defender be commanded to attack twice using its normal attack and the extra attack provided by haste?

Is there any build that claims to substantially benefit in versatility from the Mystic Theurge’s extra spell slots?

Conventional wisdom is that more spell levels are better than more spell slots of lower level. For example, this argument has been used to argue in favor of playing a Focused Specialist Wizard. From this principle, it is often inferred that even an early-entry Mystic Theurge is inferior to its single-classed parent classes. It is claimed that even though having both arcane and divine spellcasting on one character ought to be more versatile than only having one of those (but at a higher level), it almost always isn’t because the extra spell levels really do add that much versatility.

Taking the above as true, my question is this: Does there exist any Mystic Theurge build that claims to gain more versatility from mixing two spellcasting progressions than it would from only sticking to one progression? As an example, I’m pretty sure that divine and arcane necromancy can be mixed to give results that could not be gained from just one progression.

Rainbow Savant builds can be ignored. Answers do not need to prove that the build in question actually does what it claims to do – they only need to say why it claims that.

Can you benefit from the Dueling fighting style after having thrown a light weapon?

So, the PHB has this to say about unsheathing a weapon (page 190)

You can also interact with one object or feature of the environment for free, during either your move or your action. For example […] you could draw your weapon as part of the same action you use to attack.

So, if I had already a short-sword in one hand, I could technically draw the dagger dangling at my belt and throwing it as part as the same action, correct?

And since they’re both light weapons, I could then use my bonus action to attack with my short-sword (without the proficiency bonus on the attack roll), right?

But would that attack benefit from the +2 damage bonus from the Dueling fighting-style, since I did attack with only one weapon in hand, or wouldn’t it count since I technically used another weapon during this turn?

Can a user benefit from personal powers stored in an empowered object?

I realized while writing this question that I have another issue with empowered objects. Specifically, it is the object using the stored powers, rather than the wearer/wielder/user. Can such an object "target" the user with personal or "self-only" powers? I intend to have a more powerful psionic NPC loan a PC a Psychometabolic item, but most of the powers it’ll have access to are self-targeting and I realized I wasn’t sure if the PC could even use them.

is the requirement of being in a lightly obscured area to gain the benefit of the Nature’s Mantle works in a heavily obscured area?

I want to make sure I’m not creating a problem by allowing heavily obscured areas to meet the requirement of being in a lightly obscured area for the Nature’s Mantle benefit of hiding as a bonus action. Since it is a more obscured area I intended to allow it but I’m not sure if I should since it is not explicitly written.

thanks again.

Does someone with darkvision fools Nature’s Mantle when the wearer is in a dim light area and thus stops it from granting its benefit?

Looking at the rules in PHB p.183, it states that

dim light creates a lightly obscured area.

But is the area still a dim light area if someone with darkvision has that area in its darkvision range?

I think that there is a difference between the actual area lighting and the observer’s point of view of that area (darkvision considering dim light as bright light) but it is not that clear for me. Thus the question in the title as the requirements to grant the "hide as bonus action" is that the wearer be in a lightly obscured area.

thanks for helping out.