Building blockchain application step-by-step for Hyperledger Sawtooth for total beginners

I have seen many beginner to advance articles on Ethereum blockchain development like Blockchain-as-a-Service Apps Using Ethereum and Quorum and Ethereum Blockchain Application Dev with Java and Web3J API

Below is good for Hyperledger but not Sawtooth https://coding-bootcamps.com/ultimate-guide-for-building-a-blockchain-supply-chain-using-hyperledger-fabric-and-composer.html

However, I am looking for similar articles for Hyperledger Sawtooth. Any suggestion? Online search gives me links mainly to documentation

Incentive for block creation in a private blockchain

Bitcoin miners are incentivized to produce valid blocks via a trasactional reward. But let’s say I wanted to implement blockchain as part of my private data system. Who would my miner’s be? I think could just have one automated miner (on a dedicated machine) with the proof-of-work difficulty being set to something very easy. But then I’m wondering, what’s the point? Is there anything to gain by using a blockchain like this?

In other words, can someone please give an example—no matter how crude—of how someone could use a private blockchain to log transactions, or whether such a thing has any practical benefit to the users?

How much data does it take to prove a given transaction exists on the blockchain?

As I understand the SVP protocol, a client can be reasonably certain that a transaction has been accepted on the blockchain if they know it is a member of a certain block, via the Merkle path, and a reasonable number of blocks have been mined on top of that block.

How much total data would that be, roughly? I guess if you were beginning with 0 knowledge, you would need all of the block headers, beginning from the genesis block? But once you are convinced you are looking at the head of the right chain, you could discard all of the ancient block headers, and just save a recent one as a trusted starting point to evaluate subsequent transactions?


I guess the premise of my question is faulty, as a fake transaction could always be embedded in a fake chain, if enough computing resources were available. So, there is no amount of data that insures a transaction is valid, without access to other information, e.g., what is the longest chain currently in existence.

A better question for my purposes would be how much would the electricity cost to create one fake block header at today’s difficulty level? Figuring that blockchain currently pays around $ 60K to mine one block, I would guess it must be in that order of magnitude, though smaller since we are removing the race condition.

How much data does it take to prove a given transaction exists on the blockchain?

As I understand the SVP protocol, a client can be reasonably certain that a transaction has been accepted on the blockchain if they know it is a member of a certain block, via the Merkle path, and a reasonable number of blocks have been mined on top of that block.

How much total data would that be, roughly? I guess if you were beginning with 0 knowledge, you would need all of the block headers, beginning from the genesis block? But once you are convinced you are looking at the head of the right chain, you could discard all of the ancient block headers, and just save a recent one as a trusted starting point to evaluate subsequent transactions?


I guess the premise of my question is faulty, as a fake transaction could always be embedded in a fake chain, if enough computing resources were available. So, there is no amount of data that insures a transaction is valid, without access to other information, e.g., what is the longest chain currently in existence.

A better question for my purposes would be how much would the electricity cost to create one fake block header at today’s difficulty level? Figuring that blockchain currently pays around $ 60K to mine one block, I would guess it must be in that order of magnitude, though smaller since we are removing the race condition.

Blockchain endpoint working

I wanna clear this thing that how blocks are retrieved and created in from the nodes using an end point. The end point is basically centralized and have nothing to do with network if i’m not wrong. Is that end point is also running some kinda setup to keep blocks in sync as well as connected nodes? In a network we have nodes [B,C,D,E,F,G…] and we have endpoint A. Lets say we have to retrieve a block then on which node the request will be sent?

Take example of STORJ in that request lands on one server(kinda end point) only then it broadcast to all. Isn’t the centralized system.

Is it possible to separate blockchain and wallet functions?

I’m looking for a way to use bitcoin-core in monero-way (It uses separate blockchain daemon and wallet daemon).

I’d like to run bitcoin-qt interface on my laptop and connect to external node with full blockchain. In this way I can share my full node with other people and my wallet will be safe.

Is it possible to use bitcoin-core in this way?

P.S.: I listen about electrum-server, but I don’t want to use another software.

Why do we need to chain the blocks (creating blockchain) in a permissioned blockchain?

The main question is:

What does “chaining block” mean in a permissioned blockchain? OR in any blockchain network in which creating a new block does NOT need consuming resources/energy ? (even in the case of proof-of-stake)

Does “chaining blocks” (creating blockchain) WITHOUT consuming resources (in the case of PoW, this resource is electricity) make sense? where, re-calculating all hash values does NOT have any considerable cost and it takes few seconds.

In other words, Why do we need to chain the blocks (creating blockchain) in a permissioned blockchain network (such as Hyperledger whose consensus mechanism is PBFT)?

What does really mean chaining blocks without consuming resource/energy? where re-calculating all hash values and as a result replacing all blocks can be done EASILY and RAPIDLY.

The thing can make transactions history immutable in Bitcoin, is a PoW with enough difficulty and not only using blockchain data structure. Otherwise, only chaining blocks based on ex. a PBFT consensus (or even based on proof-of-stake) can be interpreted as a fallacy.

What is the role of blockchain (chained blocks) in a permissioned network? where if one is able to change one block, then he could change the whole of chain as well, by re-calculating all previous hash values, since there is NO difficulty to calculate hashes.

Note: I tried to bring up my question in several different forms to be more clear. In the case, you think some additional explanation is need, please let me know.