Can a high level warlock with Book of Ancient Secrets learn ritual spells higher than 5th level?

Let’s say I’m an 11th level Pact of the Tome Warlock with Book of Ancient Secrets. I’m able to learn spells to cast as rituals from any source, I can transcribe spells up to half my level rounded up, and have just gotten my 6th level Mystic Arcanum.

I do not actually have 6th level slots, but ritual casting doesn’t use spell slots anyway, and I am capable of casting 6th level spells (or at least one). Am I able to transcribe a 6th level ritual spell, or am I capped at learning 5th level rituals?

Did the UA “revised” Beastmaster Ranger make it into any official source book?

There was "The Ranger, Revised" pdf in the 2016 playtest material. A Beastmaster Ranger was considered the weakest class by many GMs and players, which apparently caused the need for a "revised" version.

However, I’ve never heard how exactly the playtesting ended. Googling "ranger revised" gives me the same 2016 pdf and nothing more.

What happened to the "revised" ranger from the Unearthed Arcana? Was it renamed from "revised" to something else? Was it published in any official source book, changed or unchanged? (I don’t have access to all of them so I can’t check it myself for now) Or was it abandoned by WoTC?

This is probably a duplicate of this question, which was answered in 2017, but things could change in 2021.

How do you tell if a D&D book is 3.0 or 3.5?

I’m new to d20. I recently acquired a bunch of D&D books and I’m sure they are all either 3.0 or 3.5, but it doesn’t say in the book which version it is. How can I tell which version the book is?

For instance, I have “Complete Warrior – A Player’s Guide to Combat for All Classes”. It’s hard back, published in ’03. Is it 3.0 or 3.5?

Another example, I have “Sword and Fist – A Guidebook to Fighters and Monks”. Perfect Bound, published in ’01. Is it 3.0 or 3.5?

What is the “Ultimate Book of The Master”

Dragon magazine #82 features an article from Bruce Heard referencing magical research. One early chapter contains the following line:

To begin finding the answer to that question, we must first roll up our sleeves and open the Ultimate Book of The Master to page 115, whereupon begins the section on spell research

I have done a Google search, but cannot find any references to the "Ultimate Book of The Master". Does anyone have any information on what this book may be? Is it just a reference to a fictional in-game tome?

The specific edition referenced is AD&D (my understanding is that can mean 1st or 2nd edition and I am not sure which it refers to). The magazine was published in February 1984 if that helps.

Are the Revenant rules official? If so which book are they in? [duplicate]

Critical Role spoiler ahead:

I have found the rules for this listed on Unearthed Arcana and homebrew sites but have the rules for Revenants been officially published as of yet? and What are the playable D&D races in 5e, and where can I find them?. lists as below:

Revenant (UA: "Gothic Heroes"), actually a subrace that can be applied to human, dragonborn, or tiefling

Does this, therefore, mean that Revenants are not official (come under the unofficial/official that UA rules do until they are published officially in a paid for book)

What material currently appears in the “Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron” that wasn’t reprinted in the “Eberron: Rising from the Last War” book?

The Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron (WGtE) was originally released on DMsGuild as a PDF (and on D&D Beyond) in July 2018. (See also this Q&A: What is "Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron"?) The various parts already included in it (races, dragonmarks, magic items) then went through the Unearthed Arcana public playtest process, as did the artificer class.

Eventually, the final versions of this material were published in Eberron: Rising from the Last War (E:RftLW) in November 2019. At that point, WGtE was updated to include the final versions (as they appear in E:RftLW) of the content that was already in it; the official artificer class was added to WGtE as well, though with only 1 of the 3 subclasses that appeared in E:RftLW (the Alchemist).

As of the release of Eberron: Rising from the Last War, it seems like there’s almost no reason to buy the Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron. Almost every single character option and magic item that exists in WGtE seems to have been reprinted in E:RftLW, and then the latter adds several additional things that are not in WGtE at all: the Artillerist and Battle Smith subclasses for artificer, reprints of bugbears/goblins/hobgoblins, a "new" orc race (though mechanically almost identical to the existing one in Volo’s Guide to Monsters), a group patrons mechanic, seemingly more in-depth lore, a short sample adventure, several additional magic items, and plenty of new monsters/NPCs.

By the way, this stands in stark contrast to Mike Mearls’ claims back when WGtE first came out that any future print product would be complementary, rather than just superseding/replacing WGtE entirely (even if E:RftLW was only a hypothetical at that point):

  • This book and a theoretical print release will be designed to complement each other, though some material (artificer, races) will be duplicated.

  • If we do an Eberron print product, we will design it to complement as much as possible what the PDF presents.
    Some things, like the artificer, races, and basic world info, will be picked up for a print book, but we want fans to be happy owning both.

  • yes, but we will build a print product so that the two complement each other.

However, in responding to someone’s question on /r/dndnext on Reddit about which of the 2 books would be a better purchase (to which the answer was obvious), I did begin to wonder what official material appeared exclusively in Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron. The only 2 things I’m aware of are listed in my reply to the linked comment, but I was curious whether there was anything else I’d missed. (I’m intentionally choosing not to state which things I identified in my question, so that answers will contain a complete list of WGtE-exclusive material rather than excluding those two.)

What material currently appears only in the Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron (the latest version, as of November 2019), that wasn’t also reprinted in Eberron: Rising from the Last War?

I’m mainly interested in a summary/list mechanical stuff – e.g. character options, magic items, monsters, etc. – but if there are significant lore elements mentioned only in WGtE and not in E:RftLW, it’d be nice to get a brief summary of what lore is exclusive to WGtE as well. (You don’t need to provide a full rundown of what that WGtE-exclusive lore is – just list the names of topics/sections that only WGtE has lore about, or point out where in WGtE I can find it.) I might count maps and other resources too, if they’re exclusive to WGtE.

Basically, I’m curious about any WGtE-only content that a person couldn’t get simply by buying E:RftLW.

Does reading the Book of Exalted Deeds prevent casting non-upcast 5th-level spells into a Ring of Spell Storing?

The Ring of Spell Storing states (emphasis mine):

This ring stores spells cast into it, holding them until the attuned wearer uses them. The ring can store up to 5 levels worth of spells at a time. When found, it contains 1d6 − 1 levels of stored spells chosen by the GM.

Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no effect, other than to be stored in the ring. If the ring can’t hold the spell, the spell is expended without effect. The level of the slot used to cast the spell determines how much space it uses.

While wearing this ring, you can cast any spell stored in it. The spell uses the slot level, spell save DC, spell attack bonus, and spellcasting ability of the original caster, but is otherwise treated as if you cast the spell. The spell cast from the ring is no longer stored in it, freeing up space.

The Book of Exalted Deeds states:

[…] Once you’ve read and studied the book, any spell slot you expend to cast a cleric or paladin spell counts as a spell slot of one level higher. […]

Thus, any 5th-level spell cast using a 5th-level spell slot would count as using a 6th-level spell slot, which cannot be stored into a Ring of Spell Storing. Is this correct? Is there some rule I’ve missed or way around this besides ending the benefits from the Book?

If you own the FFG Star Wars books, do you need the Genesys Core Book to start playing it?

As a long time player of the FFG Star Wars games (Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion, and Force and Destiny), I was very excited to hear about the release of FFG’s new RPG Genesys, which uses the same Narrative Dice System (albeit with slightly altered dice). While I was pleased to hear about it’s release, I was wondering if the $ 40 price tag was worth it if I already had all of the Star Wars RPG core books.

Are the rules exactly the same (obviously with altered classes, races, etc.), or is it changed enough to warrant purchasing the new book? Is it possible to play in non–Star Wars worlds with the Star Wars books?

Ultimately, what I’m asking is whether it’s different enough to require buying the new book to “play Genesys”, or whether I can “play Genesys” using the rules in my Star Wars RPG books.