Where to find information about the official DnD5e books title creatures?

I’m wondering where did the title characters from the official DnD5e books come from. What are their lores in the world of DnD 5e. I want to know more about: Tasha, Xanathar, Mordenkainen and Volo.

Where can I learn more about their stories? Is there any official information? Or are they only some cool naming for the books?

Is there any information about them in their books?

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Recomendation for material, books in order to learn Machine Learning / Deep learning using Mathematica?

I know that there are plenty of resources web sites and books, MOOC to learn Machine Learning and Deep Learning mostly in Python.

However, I am so curious to know how to learn and code using Mathematica.

Wellcome and thankful for interesting comments about what version it works, libraries, books, tutorials, ebooks, etc for Mathematica users.

If you own the FFG Star Wars books, do you need the Genesys Core Book to start playing it?

As a long time player of the FFG Star Wars games (Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion, and Force and Destiny), I was very excited to hear about the release of FFG’s new RPG Genesys, which uses the same Narrative Dice System (albeit with slightly altered dice). While I was pleased to hear about it’s release, I was wondering if the $ 40 price tag was worth it if I already had all of the Star Wars RPG core books.

Are the rules exactly the same (obviously with altered classes, races, etc.), or is it changed enough to warrant purchasing the new book? Is it possible to play in non–Star Wars worlds with the Star Wars books?

Ultimately, what I’m asking is whether it’s different enough to require buying the new book to “play Genesys”, or whether I can “play Genesys” using the rules in my Star Wars RPG books.

Are the 3.5e Dragonlance books third party or official works?

When 3rd edition rolled around, Wizards of the Coast handed the maintenance of the Dragonlance setting to Sovereign Press, the printing company owned by Dragonlance co-founder Margaret Weis. They released several Dragonlance books all the way until the end of their licence, not too long before 4th Edition came rolling around.

But I’m curious if this means that those Dragonlance books are canon. I rarely see them being referenced by guides and people talking about character builds in general, and even then in only a select few cases. which lead me to suspect that the books are not “official” works like the regular, the Forgotten Realms and the Eberron books are.

Is this true? Are they third party works because they’re printed by Sovereign Press rather than Wizards of the Coast? Or are they still official because Sovereign Press was licensed to print them, and they are an established setting and bear the WotC seal of approval?

Is there a standard hierarchy when two supplemental books contradict each other?

The spell, Energy Vortex, is found in:

  • Complete Divine (p.164) as a 4th level Cleric/Druid spell (published May 2004)
  • Spell Compendium (p.81) as a 3rd level Cleric/Druid spell (published Dec 2005)

In both books, the spell does the exact same effect/range/damage (choice of acid/fire/electricity/cold), aside from CD allowing Sonic as a 5th choice for damage type.

Since these books were published more than a year apart, I assumed this was more a correction than a typo. Is it standard to use the most recent book as a general hierarchy, or is there another, more preferred method?

Books on scientific computing, efficent NN inference, and matrix multipication

I’m trying to learn more about how inference, matrix multiplication, and scientific computing (primarily with tensors/matrices). I’m not sure what the classics here are or what good sources are. I’m primarily looking for books but classic texts of any kind are welcome (including both papers, blogs, and articles on real world implementations).

I’d like to gain an understanding of both how to implement algorithms like GEMM as efficiently as BLAS implementations do and also how to perform inference on neural networks efficiently. When I say "efficiency" I mean both latency and throughput as is classically meant but I also mean energy efficiency as well. Energy efficiency seems to be covered less however.

What are good references/books in this area?

Computation Complexity books for a mathematician

I recently attented to some computational complexity (or complexity theory, I am not sure which is the correct name) and I fell in love with it. I would like to find some books, online courses… in general resources of any kind to self-study this (securely) wonderfull subject.

My backgrund is pure mathematics with emphasys in discrete mathematics (graph theorey, crypto, coding thoery, combinatorics…), with no background in computer science. I am not sure if the last one is mandatory.

Lectures and books for beginner to approach learning simulations

I’m an incoming undergrad with a math background up to single-variable calculus, but reasonably strong programming background through algorithms, data structures, web and mobile app development. Broadly, I’m really interested in learning to simulate molecular systems and game physics, etc, but have never simulated anything before. I’d also like what I learn to be transferrable to financial markets, climate models, etc–so really focusing on principles of simulation, analysis and motivation behind simulation algorithms, limits of simulations, and more.

I’ve gone through MIT OCW 6.0002, and spent some time learning about random walks and Monte Carlo methods, as well as frequenting a smattering of random pages on molecular dynamics, but I’d really appreciate some structured, motivated resources for an absolute beginner with a programming background to learn about using programming to simulate things.