Booting gets stuck on a black screen with some text

NOTE: There are many questions with similar title, but their answers doesn’t seem to work with my problem, so please don’t report as duplicate.

I had not used my pc for a month, the last time I used my pc, Ubuntu was working great. Today(after a month), when I turned on my pc, booting got stuck on a black screen, with some text written on it. I don’t understand what is written(too much technical terms). And at last line “intramfs” is written and I can type and enter any command into it(just like terminal). Please see the picture.

Picture

And ubuntu version is 19.04(install was smooth and I faced no problems), and is dual booted alongside windows 10(which works correctly).

Dual booting Windows 10 and Ubuntu on 128 GB SSD and 1TB HDD drive. What is the best partitioning choice?

I want to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 10 but I am not sure how to partition my drives.

My SSD drive (where Windows 10 is on) has around 50 GB free space and my 1TB HDD has around 600 GB free space. This HDD already contains some other files. Also I have 8GB RAM.

I am doubting between different kind of partitions and even after a couple of hours of research I cannot decide what would be the best set-up. Here are my current options:

  1. All SSD. I would partition 40GB on the SSD drive and go /(20GB), swap(8GB), /home(12GB) — Does Windows have enough space?, Can I access my HDD drive files?, Do I even need the swap in this case?

  2. All HDD. Since I have more than enough space, it would look something like /(50-60GB), swap(8GB), /home(50-60GB) — What is the downside of this non-SSD installation (speed and computing power)?

  3. A Combination of SSD and HDD. I would use 40 GB SSD for /(32GB)& swap(8GB). My files (which require no precious SSD space) would be partitioned on the HDD /home(50-60GB). — Can I still access my other HDD drive files?

  4. … Any other suggestions?

Currently, my OS starts in a matter of seconds and the same for all of the applications. Although the 2nd option sounds preferable to me (I will never experience memory shortage), I don’t know how much this will effect the speed and stuff…

As you might have expected, I am new to all of this so It’s very possible I am making some rookie mistakes here. My apologies for that.

Ubuntu 18.04 says `Gave up waiting for suspend/resume device` when it’s booting after upgrading from 16.04

I just upgraded Ubuntu 16.04 to 18.04 and after reboot it shows

Gave up waiting for suspend/resume device /: clean, 293537/3932160 files, 4067550/15719936 blocks cryptsetup (md5_crypt): set up successfully 

then it doesn’t go to log in page.

Even though it hangs here, I can ssh in the computer and I can access folders and files. (one problem is terminal doesn’t have the ability of interpolation and showing history command though)

My quick search on this error is telling this problem is related to swap memory. Let me share some of the command outputs here and some approaches I already tried and not worked.

$   sudo blkid | grep swap /dev/mapper/sdb8_crypt: UUID="19a5cc43-2391-461e-9d36-ecb21d23cbe1" TYPE="swap" /dev/mapper/sda8_crypt: UUID="a68d5301-6f0c-4069-be2b-b43d42e4697c" TYPE="swap" 
$   sudo cat  /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume #RESUME=UUID=6f0ca38b-604e-4641-8d12-c81fd8228098 #RESUME=none RESUME=UUID=19a5cc43-2391-461e-9d36-ecb21d23cbe1 #RESUME=UUID=a68d5301-6f0c-4069-be2b-b43d42e4697c 

First row was a row I had first and I commented out it then added second, third and fourth, and tried them respectively but non of them worked well with $ sudo update-initramfs -u

$   cat /etc/default/grub # If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to update # /boot/grub/grub.cfg. # For full documentation of the options in this file, see: #   info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration'  GRUB_DEFAULT=0 #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" GRUB_ENABLE_CRYPTODISK=y  # Uncomment to enable BadRAM filtering, modify to suit your needs # This works with Linux (no patch required) and with any kernel that obtains # the memory map information from GRUB (GNU Mach, kernel of FreeBSD ...) #GRUB_BADRAM="0x01234567,0xfefefefe,0x89abcdef,0xefefefef"  # Uncomment to disable graphical terminal (grub-pc only) #GRUB_TERMINAL=console  # The resolution used on graphical terminal # note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE # you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo' #GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480  # Uncomment if you don't want GRUB to pass "root=UUID=xxx" parameter to Linux #GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID=true  # Uncomment to disable generation of recovery mode menu entries #GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true"  # Uncomment to get a beep at grub start #GRUB_INIT_TUNE="480 440 1" 
$   sudo lsinitramfs /initrd.img |grep resume bin/resume conf/conf.d/resume scripts/local-premount/resume 
$   swapon NAME      TYPE      SIZE USED PRIO /dev/dm-2 partition  16G   0B   -2 /dev/dm-3 partition  16G   0B   -3 
$   sudo update-initramfs -u update-initramfs: Generating /boot/initrd.img-4.15.0-55-generic cryptsetup: WARNING: resume device UUID=7bad70b9-6b90-424b-88e1-3b36e63ea23f uses a key file W: Possible missing firmware /lib/firmware/ast_dp501_fw.bin for module ast 

I saw tried the following solutions but none of them worked. Swap: From partition to file, now get "no matching swap device is available" threads I could find is similar to this)

https://fitzcarraldoblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/lubuntu-18-04-gave-up-waiting-for-suspend-resume-device/ (I don’t have /swapfile
$ ls /swapfile
ls: cannot access ‘/swapfile’: No such file or directory)

Problems booting – Nvidia Driver + Grub

I’m trying to get my default option in GRUB working again. Currently, it keeps hanging before login, probably on splash screen but I’m not sure since there are just some lines on a black and purple background :/

I can access my system through recovery mode with the resume option. Then everything including graphic driver is working just as it should.

Can someone help me debug this, please? It’s my working machine and I would love to have it working again – of course ^^

Thank you!

Dual Booting Win 10/Ubuntu seperate ssd nvmes

im brand new user to linux/ubuntu and am trying to install it for the first time. I got the ISO on win 10 of ubuntu 18.04 and flash it to usb thumb drive 32gb. My issue however is in regards to the actual installation of ubuntu. I have two nvme drives in my skull canyon nuc one 500gb (has win 10 on it) and one new 1TB samsung nvme drive thats completely empty. what is the best way to go about this installation process? I would like to keep windows and linux completely separate, with that being said during the install process how do i go about installing linux properly on the 1tb drive. Not sure if i choose boot alongside windows option during installation or even how to partition the blank 1tb drive properly. please help a noob out 😛

Server is not booting after attempting to mount a disk

I was trying to mount a 10Tb disk on a ubuntu server. Due to the large size of the disk I had to use parted instead of fdisk. Unfortunately I did not enable GPT support in Linux kernel, prior to mounting the disk. Upon restarting the server, it does not boot up. My initial thought was, that it is a problem with grub, so I attempted to reinstall the grub2 on :

[*] /dev/sda [*] /dev/sdb 

Using the below commands:

apt-get install --reinstall grub-pc dpkg-reconfigure grub-pc 

But later on I fount it online that:

If you don’t add GPT support in Linux kernel, after rebooting the server, the file system will no longer be mountable, or the GPT table will get corrupted.

I am able to get access to the system using the rescue service offered by the host provider. Which is a linux system based on Debian. Below are the output of the df -h and fdisk -l commands that I get from the rescue Linux service:

#df -ha  Filesystem           Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on proc                    0     0     0    - /proc sys                     0     0     0    - /sys udev                  32G     0   32G   0% /dev devpts                  0     0     0    - /dev/pts SERVER'S_IP_ADDRESS:/nfs  295G  124G  156G  45% /root/.oldroot/nfs overlay               32G  116K   32G   1% / securityfs              0     0     0    - /sys/kernel/security tmpfs                 32G     0   32G   0% /dev/shm devpts                  0     0     0    - /dev/pts tmpfs                 32G   13M   32G   1% /run tmpfs                5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock tmpfs                 32G     0   32G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu,cpuacct cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/cpuset cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/devices cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/memory cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/freezer cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/blkio cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/pids cgroup                  0     0     0    - /sys/fs/cgroup/perf_event systemd-1               0     0     0    - /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc hugetlbfs               0     0     0    - /dev/hugepages mqueue                  0     0     0    - /dev/mqueue tmpfs                6.3G     0  6.3G   0% /run/user/0     #fdisk -l Disk /dev/ram0: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram1: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram2: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram3: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram4: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram5: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram6: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram7: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram8: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram9: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram10: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram11: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram12: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram13: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram14: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/ram15: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/loop0: 3 GiB, 3221225472 bytes, 6291456 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes   Disk /dev/sda: 477 GiB, 512110190592 bytes, 1000215216 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disklabel type: dos Disk identifier: 0x04cbff79  Device     Boot    Start        End   Sectors   Size Id Type /dev/sda1           2048   33556479  33554432    16G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sda2       33556480   34605055   1048576   512M fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sda3       34605056 1000213167 965608112 460.4G fd Linux raid autodetect   Disk /dev/sdc: 9.1 TiB, 10000831348736 bytes, 19532873728 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/sdb: 477 GiB, 512110190592 bytes, 1000215216 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disklabel type: dos Disk identifier: 0x4686096e  Device     Boot    Start        End   Sectors   Size Id Type /dev/sdb1           2048   33556479  33554432    16G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sdb2       33556480   34605055   1048576   512M fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sdb3       34605056 1000213167 965608112 460.4G fd Linux raid autodetect   Disk /dev/md0: 16 GiB, 17163091968 bytes, 33521664 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/md1: 511.4 MiB, 536281088 bytes, 1047424 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes   Disk /dev/md2: 460.3 GiB, 494257111040 bytes, 965345920 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes 

How can I address this issue?

Server: ubuntu-16.04.6-server

Provider: Hetzner

Dual booting Ubuntu and windows 10 on Baytrail /2 gb /32 gb eMMC device

I have a Baytrail netbook with 2gb Ram and 32 gb eMMC storage comes with windows 10 32 bit preloaded .But i want to have an Ubuntu based 64 bit distro along with the default OS . I can’t completely replace it with Ubuntu since specs doesn’t allow 64 bit ubuntu to run smoothly as like win 10 (32bit ) does and manufacturer only support OS that comes preinstalled . How can i overcome the storage space , performance issue ? and help me to choose the correct Ubuntu flavor .

Can’t stop booting into Emergency Mode

Cant get out of Emergency mode. Believe this is an fstab issue as this was changed previously.

Attempted to implement solutions from related posts, with no success.

I’m a relative beginner in terms of Linux and the Linux filesystem.

Contents of fstab:

# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>  #Entry for /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root : UUID=7d23c452-c823-447d-bf55-fa50efc9c94e   /   ext4    errors=remount-ro   0   1 #Entry for /dev/sda1 : UUID=6aad6fc0-ad8c-4ea9-99d6-d33e62216061   /boot   ext4    defaults    0   2 #Entry for /dev/sdb1 : UUID=B2240880240849B5   /media/mark/Seagate0Expansion0Drive   ntfs-3g defaults,nodev,nosuid,locale=en_GB.UTF-8    0   0 #Entry for /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 : UUID=da4025a1-de2d-471b-b015-c630cde04989   none    swap    sw  0   0 

Error recieved at boot