Does the paladin’s Divine Health feature protect against both common and magical diseases?

By 3rd level, a Paladin gains the following ability (PHB, pg. 85):

Divine Health: The divine magic flowing through you makes you immune to disease.

Does this protect against both common AND magical disease?

There is no differentiation between the two. Disease is simply disease in the relevant entries (which I can’t find anymore). A few spells afflict you with disease; sickly common folk may be diseased, and certain magical aura’s on enemies may inflict a diseased state. Since these all count under the ‘Disease’ umbrella, and the Paladin trait simply says a magical energy is making you immune to disease… I assume this is read as “Immune to [all] disease.”

In what order do you half and double when damage is both halved and doubled? [duplicate]

Suppose a creature is vulnerable to radiant damage, and is beginning its turn in the area of effect of Moonbeam. It will be taking radiant damage, and the damage roll is a 13. It succeeds on its saving throw, so the damage is halved, but it is vulnerable to radiant damage, so the damage is doubled.

Is the damage first halved, giving 6, and then doubled, giving 12? Or is it doubled first, then halved to give 13? Or do the effects cancel, for a total damage of 13?

Dhampir bite attack, does it add both STR and CON? (DND 5e)

Here’s a little extract from the Dhampir bite attack (emphasis mine):

"Your fanged bite is a natural weapon, which counts as a simple melee weapon with which you are proficient. You add your Constitution modifier to the attack and damage rolls when you attack with your bite. Your bite deals 1d4 piercing damage on a hit. While you are missing half or more of your hit points, you have advantage on attack rolls you make with this bite."

Do I add both STR and CON to it? Or does CON replace STR?

I’m a bit confused, because it counting as a simple melee weapon attack means it would normally be 1d20+STR+prof to hit and dmg_die+STR to damage. The wording is pretty different from, for example, stuff like Finesse weapons, which makes me think it adds both modifiers. Which makes the attack roll something like 1d20+STR+CON+prof and the dmg roll 1d4+STR+CON. Is that correct?

D&D 5th Edition: Truesight and Darkvision, Why Does A Monster Have Both?

While creating a homebrew monster based around eyes and vision, I looked up monsters that had both darkvison and truesight, surprisingly only two have both, the Avatar of Death and Canoloth, I’ll use the Canoloth as the example here.

When reading the descriptions of both vision types, darkvision allows a creature to see in dim light as if it were bright light and darkness as if it were dim light but it can’t discern color and only sees shades of grey, with truesight not only can you see in normal darkness but also magical darkness, as well as many other benefits, so what confuses me is why any creature would have both forms of vision (especially when it only has darkvision out to 60 feet but truesight out to 120 feet) when truesight already has the only benefit of darkvision along with all its other benefits?

Have I misinterpreted the mechanics of these different sight types, is their a hidden reason behind having both? Or is it just a slipup of the designers to give a creature like the Canoloth both forms of vision?

Is this a good alternative, both mechanically and role-playing, to the oathbreaker paladin?

In a current D&D 5e game I’m running, one of my players is running an Oath of Glory paladin who, after coming to disagree with his war-god deity, effectively broke his oath. To clarify the exact disagreement, his god is a god of victory, war, and competition but the character has come to value protecting others and promoting free will. While we were initially talking about just changing him to a different deity, we both came to feel like either a class or subclass change to reflect this rather important change would be proper.

We started with Oathbreaker, but both agreed that wouldn’t work as the character isn’t evil and remains opposed to necromancy. Then, we considered Redemption, but agreed that his character won’t be into the pacifism there. We went through a lot of the other subclasses, but didn’t quite find one that fit.

Thus, we come to the homebrew subclass. It is meant to emphasize the ability to change, both yourself and others, and being able to learn from and grow from failures (side-note: there’s a god of free will in the world which will likely be his new deity). I’ll list out everything below with subclass content in bold and add my comments/justifications below. All help, opinions, and suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Tenets of New Paths

  • Forgiveness. Forgive others who have erred and chosen the wrong paths, just as others have forgiven you.
  • Progress. Move forward and push others to do the same.
  • Consideration. Tradition does not make something right, nor does innovation. Everything must be judged for what it is, not where it came from.
  • Flexibility. Not everyone is fortunate enough to have one path which is correct for them. Be willing to change yourself and patient with others when they must change.
  • Reflection. Consider each of your actions and whether they can truly be called good in the eyes of the gods. Repeat those which are but do not be weighed down by those which are not.

This one is pretty straightforward and based largely in the character situation, described in the intro.

Oath Spells

3rd. Protection from Evil and Good, Comprehend Languages

5th. Alter Self, Fortune’s Favor

9th. Tongues, Protection from Energy

13th. Freedom of Movement, Polymorph

17th. Dispel Evil and Good, Passwall

This one I had some trouble with. I like the spells thematically, but I worry that they are too similar to the Devotion list and a bit too eclectic to be useful. Also, I worry somewhat that Polymorph overshadows the rest of the list. I initially justified it by being a balance between Animate Dead and Dominate Person from Oathbreaker, but the more I’ve thought about it, the less I like it here.

3rd level – Channel Divinity

Redeem the Fallen: You can use your Channel Divinity to lead discouraged or downcast allies to new victory. As an action, choose a number of allies that you can see within 30 ft. Any of those creatures which are charmed, frightened, or under the effects of a similar condition are returned to normal.

This one is roughly balanced against the Oath of the Crown’s Turn the Tide, but rather than healing a similar amount to a 1st level cure wounds, this removes a status condition in a similar way to a 2nd level lesser restoration. So, perhaps a bit stronger, but more circumstantial.

Break the Stubborn: You can use your Channel Divinity to scatter those who would block your path. As a bonus action, choose a number of creatures equal to your charisma modifier (minimum 1). Each of those creatures must make a Strength saving throw or be tossed aside by divine force. They are launched 20 feet in a direction of your choice, taking fall damage if necessary, and land prone.

For this one, it’s intended to be an alternative to the Channel Divinities which Turn enemies, such as Turn the Faithless from Oath of the Ancients. On the one hand, it doesn’t disable enemies for as long and it relies of strength saves, which monsters tend to do better at than something like Wisdom. On the other, it isn’t limited to a specific creature type, plus gives a lot more flexibility in battlefield control.

7th and 18th level – Aura of Hope

Beginning at 7th level, your example of determination inspires those around you. You and friendly creatures within 10 feet of you experience the benefits of the Bless spell. At 18th level, this increases to 30 ft.

This is a fairly straightforward comparison. As compared to the Oathbreaker’s Aura of Hate, this is again more versatile but less potentially powerful. That said, I also feel like it’s a bit weak to other auras, especially the Aura of Warding from Oath of the Ancients, but maybe I undervalue Bless.

15th level – Forge a New Oath

Starting at 15th level, you may call upon the power of your god for an exceptional boon. As an action, you may pick one spell of 7th level or lower from the cleric spell list with a casting time of 1 action and cast it. You may only use this feature once per day.

I found this one a bit hard to balance as the other subclasses have a lot of variation. I feel like it’s relatively equivalent to the permanent resistances granted by Oathbreaker’s Supernatural Resistance, but, again, there’s a lot of potential variation here.

20th level – Create a New Future

Starting at 20th level, you may use a bonus action to cause creatures within range of your Aura of Hope to do the impossible. Each friendly creature, including yourself, within range of your Aura of Hope may replace the roll of their next ability check, saving throw, or attack roll with a 20. You may only use this ability once per day.

I do feel this one might be too powerful. A lot of the other subclasses give the paladin some kind of super form, such as Dread Lord from Oathbreaker, but this one allows for truly massive burst damage. This largely comes from my preference for burst damage and more fast-paced combats. Still, I’m open to feedback.

And there we have it! Again, my main question is twofold:

  1. Does it makes sense from a role playing perspective for the PC as described?
  2. Does it seems mechanically balanced against other Paladin subclasses, especially Oathbreaker?

Thanks for reading and feel free to let me have it for this mess.

Is Wisdom (survival) skill used for both tracking and finding tracks?

It is mentioned that to follow tracks you need to find them. It is also mentioned it can take up to an hour outdoor to find tracks you have lost (all under tracking, which is Wisdom (Survival).

The way I read it would be to use Survival no matter the situation (for both finding and following) but I read some people would use perception or investigation to find the tracks. When looking at the table for Sylvan random encounter in DMG p.87, in one entry it uses Wisdom (Survival) to both find and follow the tracks.

Also, I see a problem using other skills to find the tracks for a Ranger character because Ranger favored enemy feature states you have advantage on Wisdom (Survival) to track your favored enemy. Then it would be very strange for the Ranger not being able to find tracks he could easily follow due to his advantage on a check. And what if the Ranger for some reason is not proficient in perception would never be able to find tracks so not able to follow any?

So, the question is easy but I fear the answer is not as I was not able to find a straight answer to it.

I want to make sure that any character who want to become a good tracker (either through ranger or rogue sub-class) can do so. I feel that having to be good at 2 or 3 skills to accomplish one thing (i.e.tracking) is not the common usage of skills in 5e.

thanks for helping out.

Heat Metal on Animated Armour – Can something be both an object and a creature? [duplicate]

Heat metal says (Emphasis mine) :

Choose a manufactured metal object, such as a metal weapon or a suit of heavy or medium metal armor, that you can see within range. You cause the object to glow red-hot. Any creature in physical contact with the object takes 2d8 fire damage when you cast the spell. Until the spell ends, you can use a bonus action on each of your subsequent turns to cause this damage again.

The target in this case was Animated armour (which is a construct).

In our session we did rule that it could work just because it fit well with the story. We played it out that the metal was melting and deforming so the joints wouldn’t work. However the issue we had comes down to:

Can something be both an object and a creature?

The armour needs to be a manufactured object for the spell to work (and it specifically mentions a suit of metal armour) but also needs to be a creature to take the damage.

Why both DSolve and NDSolve are unable to solve a second-order differential equation?

I am trying to solve a recurrence relation using generating functions method. After some long calculations, I have arrived to this second-order differential equation: $ 0.5 x^5 y”(x)+(2x^4+x^3)y'(x)+\left(x^3+x^2+x-1\right)y(x)+1=0$

and these conditions: $ y(0)=1, y'(0)=1$ . $ y(x)$ is the function that needs to be expanded as Taylor Series at $ x=0$ to obtain the sequence from the coefficients. However, when I try to solve it both using DSolve and NDSolve, I have no luck. With DSolve it just returns the request itself:

$ $ \text{DSolve}\left[\left\{0.5 x^5 y”(x)+(2. x+1) x^3 y'(x)+\left(1. x^3+x^2+x-1\right)y(x)+1=0,y(0)=1,y'(0)=1\right\},y,x\right]$ $

And with NDSolve I just receive errors and no equation:

Power::infy: Infinite expression 1/0.^5 encountered. Infinity::indet: Indeterminate expression 0. ComplexInfinity encountered. NDSolve::ndnum: Encountered non-numerical value for a derivative at x == 0.`. 

$ \text{NDSolve}\left[\left\{0.5 x^5 y”(x)+(2. x+1) x^3 y'(x)+\left(1. x^3+x^2+x-1\right)y(x)+1=0,y(0)=1,y'(0)=1\right\},y,\{x,0,1\}\right]$

How could I resolve this problem?