Browser loses connectivity to website. Switching browsers helps, but just temporarily [closed]

This problem shows up when I have poor WiFi connectivity, or no WiFi. I’m using my android phone, with chrome browser, to connect to my website (LAMP), and limping along with poor response, but happy and productive. But then I can’t reach the website at all. I can reach other websites but not my website. I’ve tried closing my chrome and reopening it. If I wait several minutes I can usually get back to my website. However, my application is time-critical and this delay is very disruptive. I’ve found that when I can’t get through on chrome, if I immediately switch to the Samsung browser (also chromium-based) I can regain access to the my website right away. Then after several minutes, I might lose access again. I can immediately regain access if I switch back to chrome. So the problem is not chrome itself. Perhaps if I had 2 instances of chrome, say chrome and chrome-beta, I could switch between those successfully. But I haven’t tried that experiment. In long sessions, with very bad connectivity, I have to switch browsers about every 5 minutes.

It seems like the bad connectivity causes Apache to temporarily ignore me. Perhaps some mechanism whereby the socket (or some other intermediate-entity, like a PHP worker) is marked "bad" but not closed. So that intermediate-entity has to timeout before the same browser can connect again. Perhaps by switching browsers, a new intermediate-entity is opened and the old one abandoned. I’m just guessing at a possible mechanism.

I’ve looked at apache error log, apache access log, php error log and php-fpm error log. I don’t see anything that coincides with my connectivity problem. My php max_execution_time is set to 120. I’m not hitting that as far as I can tell.

body overflow hidden but keep browser’s native scrollbar

I’m using locomotive scroll library for smooth scrolling, The js file of this library creates a custom scrollbar to the body and there is even an option we can disable it.

See the demo of locomotive library codepne demo here

The CSS part of this library makes the native scrollbar hidden.

html.has-scroll-smooth {   overflow: hidden;  } 

I need the browser native scrollbar should be there and for that, I made the overflow: auto.

html.has-scroll-smooth {   overflow: auto;  } 

But it creates extra whitespace. Is there any way to keep the browser’s native scrollbar?

The tweaks I’ve made it codepen demo here

Why is this not aligning correctly on phone browsers?

Why is this not aligning correctly on phone browsers?

Kindly look at this page, on a phone browser:
https://cheers.desi/profile/munafasutra/

I have not checked on android, but on iPhone etc, there is so much gap on left side, and right side is getting all cut off…
What is happening?

All the css is on the page itself, for now. Will put it in a different file later.

The theme file loaded is this:
(only theme, without content)
https://cheers.desi/themes/social.htm…

Why is this not aligning correctly on phone browsers?

Do browsers know domains that are supposed to be encrypted?

Do browsers have a list with sites that are supposed to be encrypted?

Could a man in the middle attack be performed by presenting a user a http site instead of an https site? That way the server would not need to provide a certificate.

It wouldn’t show up as a secure site in the browser but I think most people wouldn’t notice it. And it wouldn’t warn the user, because there are legitemate sites who don’t use https.

Would such an attack be possible or does the browser notice that the site is supposed to use https but doesn’t?

Effect of Firefox’s “Responsive Design Mode” on the browser’s fingerprint

Today I switched ON the "Responsive Design Mode" under the "Web Developer" Section of the Firefox menu, and from the dropdown menu selected "iPhone X/XS iOS 12".

So now every webpage I visited was being sent the request that the screen size of my device was "375×812".

My question is that, can this method enhance my protection against browser fingerprinting(assuming I also take some other precautions)? Because the websites now wouldn’t be able to know my original aspect ratio/screen resolution, and above 2 iPhones are quite common too(I am using a laptop).

I earlier tried to scale the Firefox window to nearly the aspect ratio of a mobile phone, but that didn’t make any differnce at all.

Note:

(i) In the context of this question my adversaries are only the companies and their websites,and not the Governments & ISPs.

(ii) I am just asking about the effect of this method on my browser’s fingerprint, that is, whether it will increase or decrease the fingerprint. Be advised: I am not using this as the only method.

(iii) Firefox version: 78.0.2

(iv) OS: some linux distro.

Why are browsers makeing PUT requests for static assets on my site?

Our site hosts static assets at /assets/…. In debugging a font-related issue, I looked through our logs for unusual activity. I found a bunch of requests like these

method path                         referer PUT     /assets/js/40-8b8c.chunk.js https://mysite.com PUT     /assets/fonts/antique.woff2 https://mysite.com/assets/css/mobile-ef45.chunk.css 

The requests come from lots of different IP addresses all over the world. I don’t see any pattern in the User-Agents. The only HTTP methods are HEAD (odd, but fine), GET (expected), and PUT (very suspicious).

I haven’t been able to identify any code in our system that would cause a browser to make PUT requests to these paths.

I have no evidence that this activity is malicious. It could certainly be a broken browser plugin.

Has anyone seen this sort of behavior?