Abilities of my ISP to stop me from browsing

I visited a football site yesterday to stream a match online, and since then my connection is unstable. Like, I get connected at times and loses at times. I was over at my friends’ and did the same and the network in his house was also weak while trying to visit that website, although I was able to visit the site using cellular data, later.

Can my ISP can do such a thing?

Safe mobile browsing

What actions can I take to make web browsing on mobile phone (android) as safe as possible? My main concern are sites that would install malware (has happened before on desktop computer). On a computer, I would run browser in a sandbox environment (e.g. Sandboxie). Are there similar alternatives for mobile phones? Or are mobile environments more completely sandboxed by nature?

Spam Mail Related to my Browsing

I was searching google to find a good printer to buy. To my horror, the next day I got a spam mail with theme "Print smarter at low price". Is this a coincidence or is my PC breached? What should I do? No alerts from Anti-Virus. Or can that webpage I opened install some malware? I didn’t click on anything there.

How to report false positive to Google Safe Browsing without signing up with Google?

I was wondering how to report a false positive to Google Safe Browsing without having to create a Google account and feeding their insatiable hunger for more data?

I have not found such a way as of yet. Google pretty much seems intent on preventing any contact in this matter or others.

Background

My domain – yep whole one, including subdomains – was reported as (two examples):

Firefox blocked this page because it might try to trick you into installing programs that harm your browsing experience (for example, by changing your homepage or showing extra ads on sites you visit).

… and:

This site is unsafe

The site https://***********.net/ contains harmful content, including pages that:

Install unwanted or malicious software on visitors’ computers

I won’t disclose my domain here, but given I have a list of digests for all the files located on my (private) website and the list is signed with my PGP key and I verified the hashes and the signature and all checked out, I am sufficiently certain that this is a false positive. None of these files have changed in the last four years, because my current software development activities are going on elsewhere.

Unfortunately there is no useful information to be had from the “details” provided by Google Safe Browsing. A full URL to the alleged malicious content would have been helpful; heck even a file name or something like MIME-type plus cryptographic hash …

I have two pieces of content on my website where one could debate whether they are PUA/PUP (as it’s called these days). Both are executables inside a ZIP file and alongside the respective source code which was used to create those executables. So in no way would any of that attempt to install anything on a visitors computer, unless we imagine a fictitious browser hellbent on putting its user at risk by requesting to run at highest privileges upon start and then unpacking every download and running found executables without user interaction. And even then one of the two pieces of software would fail and the other would be visible.

  1. One is a Proof of Concept for an exploit of Windows debug ports which has been patched for well over a decade and so will hardly be a danger to anyone.
  2. The other is a tutorial which includes a keylogger which – when run – is clearly visible to the user. So no shady dealings here either.

But since these two items came up in the past, I thought I should mention them.

Anyway, a cursory check on VirusTotal showed one out of seventy engines giving a “malicious” for my domain. Given Google bought VT some time ago, it stands to reason they use it for Google Safe Browsing.

The mysterious engine with the detection is listed as “CRDF” and I still have been unable to find out who or what that refers to. So obviously there is no way to appeal, request a review or whatever … seems Google is judge, jury and executioner in this one.

So how do I “appeal”?

Can my employer see my phone browsing history on my work desktop?

What if i logged in my work pc using my personal google account?

Can my employer see what i have been googling on my phone under my work desktop’s browsing history?

What about under “my activity” in google? Would it be auto synced? (simply put – i logged in my work pc + personal mobile using the same Google account.. So would my private searches done using my phone be available on my work pc?)

How is browsing from a virtual machine/virtual box preventing fingerprinting or tracking?

is it increasing your internet security in terms of privacy/tracking/fingerprinting, if you are surfing with your web browser in a virtual machine enviroinment (virtual box + vpn)? Instead of surfing from your normal windows operating system…

Or is a virtual machine not helping you in fingerprinting cases? I just want to understand if you can use a virtual machine as a additional privacy tool and if yes, on what aspects would it have an impact (ip address, virus infections, fingerprinting, etc.)?

Thanks