In Roll for Shoes Prison Module, how much hp should each character have?

The "Prison Module" module by Mongoose systems (given out free in 2020) offers a variant rule for Roll For Shoes involving wounds and scars: you take a wound when you are attacked, hit by a trap, or fail a dangerous action, and if you take a second wound in the same place, it becomes a scar that cannot be healed anymore. It says that if you take as many scars as you have HP, you die. However, I cannot find in the module anywhere how much HP you have. Should I just have them roll a d6? Do I set an HP level based on their class? Or what was the intent here?

Can a character take 10 or 20 on a Spellcraft check to identify magical items?

This came up in this question: What's an efficient way to handle magical item identification?. Many people suggested taking 10 on Spellcraft checks to identify magical items. I certainly see the appeal—but is it possible in all cases?

I thought that taking 10 or 20 was only possible if many attempts could be made and failure was not harmful (or if it was, the character accepted the harm). Since some magical items could be cursed or booby-trapped, it seems that trying to identify the item could be enough to trigger its harmful effects. By trying to identify such items, a character may be in "immediate danger" without knowing it. Does this mean that one cannot take 10 or 20?

For convenience, here’s what Paizo says about it (link):

Taking 10 and Taking 20

A skill check represents an attempt to accomplish some goal, usually while under some sort of time pressure or distraction. Sometimes, though, a character can use a skill under more favorable conditions, increasing the odds of success.

Taking 10:

When your character is not in immediate danger or distracted, you may choose to take 10. Instead of rolling 1d20 for the skill check, calculate your result as if you had rolled a 10. For many routine tasks, taking 10 makes them automatically successful. Distractions or threats (such as combat) make it impossible for a character to take 10. In most cases, taking 10 is purely a safety measure—you know (or expect) that an average roll will succeed but fear that a poor roll might fail, so you elect to settle for the average roll (a 10). Taking 10 is especially useful in situations where a particularly high roll wouldn’t help.

Taking 20:

When you have plenty of time, you are faced with no threats or distractions, and the skill being attempted carries no penalties for failure, you can take 20. In other words, if you roll a d20 enough times, eventually you will get a 20. Instead of rolling 1d20 for the skill check, just calculate your result as if you had rolled a 20.

Taking 20 means you are trying until you get it right, and it assumes that you fail many times before succeeding. Taking 20 takes 20 times as long as making a single check would take (usually 2 minutes for a skill that takes 1 round or less to perform).

Since taking 20 assumes that your character will fail many times before succeeding, your character would automatically incur any penalties for failure before he or she could complete the task (hence why it is generally not allowed with skills that carry such penalties). Common "take 20" skills include Disable Device (when used to open locks), Escape Artist, and Perception (when attempting to find traps).

Can I replay an AL module with the same character to get a treasure I missed?

I was wondering about the rules on replaying an official D&D 5e Adventurer’s League module with the same character:

If I am willing to forgo taking anything with me during the initial session (ie, no xp, rewards, DT days, renown, gold etc), can I run it a second time with the same character?

The reason being that this is the only module in all three seasons that has a weapon my character is able to use, and I’d like a second chance at rolling for it.

How would a large character use stealth?

Being that a large creature is larger than most things on the battlefield (and even in normal circumstances), how can one reasonably say that they were unable to see it? Even if it moves quietly, its sheer size should give away its presence (not to mention “a giant shadow is suddenly cast over you” would be a dead give away!

So, how could a large creature reasonably sneak about without being seen or heard, without breaking “suspension of disbelief?”

(note, I’m excluding things like the spell Invisibility)

Can a character inlay a +1 wand into a weapon and still gain its casting benefit?

I’ve been playing 5e for about a year now and recently started my own campaign DMing for a group of people that have never played before. They took to it immediately! Things have been going pretty well so far and we’ve been having a great time.

Our group’s warlock recently found a Wand of the War Mage +1. He’d like to find a high level wizard who can help him inlay it into a dagger (or, for those more flavour text oriented, a black kris blade). The goal being to then have a functioning dagger that gives a +1 to spell attack rolls. It would still be primarily a spellcasting focus, but would additionally give him a little bit of melee should he be caught in close range and not able to escape (he is a pure caster and not a bladelock so will be doing his best to avoid direct combat most of the time).

I asked my former DM (a very much RAW kind of guy) and he said NO. He didn’t really have a good explanation as to why though. I am, however, leaning in the opposite direction, If he’s willing to part with his gold I see no reason not to let this happen. Still, is there support for or against this decision?

I don’t yet have all the materials myself and was wondering if there is anything outright stated about this type of crafting (inlaying) in RAW. That being said, I would love to hear more opinions, either for or against, from some more experienced DMs.

Does my character know he’s ill while incubating a disease?

My character was bitten by a Dire Rat and through accidental meta-gaming reasons, I know he’s incubating Filth Fever. I want to ask the Paladin in our party to remove it before it can affect my stats, however, I don’t really know if my character would know he’s ill before the stat damage occurs. Is there any ruling for this?

Does this character concept involving never taking a long rest and converting spell slots to sorcery points (aka coffeelock) violate RAW?

Does the following, very cheesy character concept, violate any RAW? Please cite rules or official rulings in your answer. (Apart from RAW, I expect my DM to disallow or limit the concept, in the interest of balance. That is not part of my question.)

Elf. Multiclass: Sorcerer 2+ / Warlock 1+ / Bard 1

  • Never takes a long rest. Ever. See question, Must 5e elves take a long rest? Specifically, whether adventuring or not, she makes sure that every 8 hour block includes more than 2 hours of combat or strenuous activity, to ensure that no interpretation of long rest rules would allow a long rest to be automatically triggered.
  • Converts warlock spell slots into sorcery points. See @JeremyECrawford’s tweet.
  • Converts sorcery points into sorcery spell slots (or into spellcasting spell slots, once also multiclassing Bard) via Flexible Casting
  • Spell slots created from sorcery points disappear upon long rest, as per Flexible Casting and a tweet from @JeremyECrawford; therefore these created spell slots will not disappear until used, e.g. for a character taking no long rests
  • Spell slots created from sorcery points are in addition to, and not restoration of the sorcerer’s spell slots which refresh on a long rest. This is not 100% clear from RAW or clarifications. But:
    (a) Flexible Casting uses the phrase, “additional Spell Slots”;
    (b) the rule stating that created spell slots disappear on long rests is superfluous if created spell slots can only replace expended spell slots — to have meaning it must be possible to create spell slots which are not replacements;
    (c) flexible casting does not use the word “recover”, which is the word used for wizards’ Arcane Recovery
  • Restores warlock spell slots on a short rest, and repeats the cycle above, converting warlock spell slots to sorcery points to sorcerer (or spellcasting) spell slots
  • During periods of downtime, takes as many short rests per day as permissible, to build up a stockpile of created sorcerer spell slots
  • Stockpiling requires using bonus actions out of combat, discussed elsewhere
  • Stockpiling requires having short rests on downtime days, discussed in a comment below
  • While adventuring, during combat, uses created spell slots to cast spells, and/or uses flexible casting to convert those spell slots back into sorcery points
  • While adventuring, after combat, will use created spell slots with Bard spells to restore hits points, since restoring hit points via long rest is unavailable, and via hit dice is mostly unavailable

I’m pretty sure this is not RAI, but does it violate RAW in some way?

How can I quickly get a player back into a session after their character dies?

As a GM, what kind of techniques could I use to help a player re-join the gaming session after their character dies? I want to avoid any major interruptions to the flow of the adventure. I would also like to avoid having to end the session immediately or making them sit on the side-lines for the rest of the session.