Protection from Evil cast on a player who’s already under a Charm Person spell?

I’m currently playing a D&D 3.5 campaign and in our last session our fighter has fallen under a Charm Person spell cast by an evil enemy spellcaster. My character is a Cleric and has access to both Protection from Evil and Magic Circle against Evil. If I cast the former upon the figher, or the other one so that the fighter is included in the affected area, what happens? I’m not sure how to interpret the spell’s description. From the PHB (emphasis mine):

The barrier blocks any attempt to possess the warded creature (by a magic jar attack, for example) or to exercise mental control over the creature (including enchantment (charm) effects and enchantment (compulsion) effects that grant the caster ongoing control over the subject, such as dominate person). The protection does not prevent such effects from targeting the protected creature, but it suppresses the effect for the duration of the protection from evil effect.

Therefore, it seems that once the spell is cast the target becomes immune to the mental influence of the evil entity. However, the spell description also says that (emphasis mine)

If the protection from evil effect ends before the effect granting mental control does, the would-be controller would then be able to mentally command the controlled creature. Likewise, the barrier keeps out a possessing life force but does not expel one if it is in place before the spell is cast.

It is clear that the spell does not nullify Charm Person, but the controller seems (at least) to be unable to give orders to the targeted creature. What about the order given before Protection from Evil is cast? There are three possible interpretations:

  1. Nothing happens, as the target was already Charmed before;
  2. The creature is still Charmed but the evil guy cannot give new orders (as Protection suppresses the effects of Charme);
  3. Charme Person is stopped for the duration of the Protection spell, and my fighter is free to act as he pleases.

Thank you for your input!

Can you train a hydra after using Charm Monster?

So my plucky halfling street performer bard is whisked away to a magical land and lands in a tropical beach. A six-headed hydra assails the party from the surf. In response, my halfling softens it up with a dirge of doom and successfully enchants it with Charm Monster. I’m level 10, so in theory it is now a nice, friendly hydra for ten days.

So, the question: Can I use Handle Animal or any other mechanic to domesticate the beast and get me a pet-six headed hydra?

Can a Chwinga Grant a Given Person More Than one Charm?

So, within the Chwinga statblock, which can be found in Tomb of Annihilation and Icewind Dale: Rime of the Icemaiden, this ability appears:

Magical Gift (1/Day). The chwinga targets a humanoid it can see within 5 feet of it. The target gains a supernatural charm of the DM’s choice. See the Dungeon Master’s Guide for information on supernatural charms.

So, the question is how this interacts with the rule on simultaneous effects. Does Magical Gift linger along with the charm it bestows, or is it an instantaneous effect with the charm simply being bestowed, and thus able to be used an infinite amount of times on a given target without losing the effect of the blessings? (Yes, I am aware of the once per day limit, I’m asking if it could still be used every day to stack up effects, or possibly multiple Chwingas using it all at the same time for the same result)

What type of action is the opposed charisma check in Charm Monster?

Scenario

Standard action, the bard casts Charm Monster. The monster changes posture, it seems to have worked!

"Back up, I charmed it" – he yells to his allies (free action)

while gesturing at the monster to stop fighting (move action or fluff alluding to action for next round?)

Question

What’s the earliest he can make the Opposed Charisma Check to convince (Int 1) monster to back off and stop attacking allies, assuming all his allies immediately went full defense and that there’s no one except for the party and the monster there?

Is an unsuccessful attack on a creature under the effect of Charm Person “harmful” for purposes of ending the spell?

Consider the following elaborate scenario, which nevertheless actually occurred at our table.

Two PCs, Sophie Sorcerer and Roger Rogue, sneak into the hideout of hapless villain Tarley Target. While hidden, Sophie uses her Subtle Casting metamagic to silently cast sleep, rendering Tarley unconscious without ever alerting him to the intrusion. Sophie and Roger swiftly exfiltrate the sleeping Tarley from the hideout to their camp nearby, where Sophie successfully casts charm person on him. When the sleep spell ends and Tarley awakes, Sophie takes advantage of Tarley’s charmed condition: she dupes him into believing that someone else actually assaulted him, and that the PCs are in fact his saviors. Tarley, overcome with gratitude and having little cause to believe the PCs are really hostile, proceeds to spill his secrets. Once satisfied that she has squeezed every bit of useful information from Tarley, Sophie signals to Roger — who has been quietly, nonchalantly moving into striking position — to kill him. Initiative is rolled. Tarley is ruled surprised. Roger goes first, attacks, and misses.

Does Tarley’s charmed condition end?

The description of charm person says a target that fails its save "is charmed by you until the spell ends or until you or your companions do anything harmful to it." Does an unsuccessful attack count as "harmful" for purposes of charm person? Would it make a difference if Tarley remained unaware of the attack — e.g., because (as happened here) the DM ruled him distracted by Sophie’s riveting conversation?

Related questions:

  • This question asked what "harmful" means vis-à-vis charm person, but only in the context that the charmed condition restricts the charmed creature’s ability to "target the charmer with harmful abilities or magical effects."
  • This question asked whether the target of charm person has to know who damaged them in order for the spell to end, but that presumes damage was actually dealt.

Can you summon a spiritual weapon into the bubble created by Bead of Force? Can whoever is inside cast charm person on someone outside the bubble?

The wording for Bead of Force says "Only breathable air can pass through the sphere’s wall. No Attack or other Effect can." which obviously means that spells such as firebolt or ray of sickness could not harm a creature inside. However, what about spells that only require line of sight?

I’ve read the discourse on Wall of Force, which suggests that you would not be able to do such spells, and the wording is similar to Bead of Force.

Are undead and creatures immune to charm excluded from the HP count of Sleep?

From the spell description:

Sleep (…) Creatures within 20 feet of a point you choose within range are affected in ascending order of their current hit points (ignoring unconscious creatures). Starting with the creature that has the lowest current hit points,(…) Subtract each creature’s hit points from the total before moving on to the creature with the next lowest hit points. A creature’s hit points must be equal to or less than the remaining total for that creature to be affected. Undead and creatures immune to being charmed aren’t affected by this spell. (PH p.276)

Now, to build the ascending order of their current hitpoints, the spell instructs to count everyone in area of effect, but only ignore unconscous creatures. Then later on it says that Undead and creatures immune to being charmed aren’t affected.

Are those two latter kinds of creatures excluded from the roll of current HP by default? Following the “if they were it would say so” philosophy of Sage Advice, it doesn’t seem so to me.

Can a Succubus use its Charm action to make my undead minion attack me?

I animated a corpse (into a zombie) using the animate dead spell. During a fight with a succubus, the succubus tried to charm the zombie using its Charm ability:

One humanoid the fiend can see within 30 feet of it must succeed on a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw or be magically charmed for 1 day. The charmed target obeys the fiend’s verbal or telepathic commands. If the target suffers any harm or receives a suicidal command, it can repeat the saving throw, ending the effect on a success. If the target successfully saves against the effect, or if the effect on it ends, the target is immune to this fiend’s Charm for the next 24 hours.

The zombie is not immune to being charmed according to its stat block – but the animate dead spell says that I command the undead how to act.

Can the zombie be charmed into fighting me? In general, can creatures you command (familiars, summoned, animated) be charmed into fighting their master?

Does an Iron Flask (5e) work on a creature that is immune to Charm?

The Iron Flask states, “You can use an action to remove the flask’s stopper and release the creature the flask contains. The creature is friendly to you and your companions for 1 hour and obeys your commands for that Duration. If you give no commands or give it a Command that is likely to result in its death, it defends itself but otherwise takes no Actions. At the end of the Duration, the creature acts in accordance with its normal disposition and Alignment.”

Now my issue with this comes from the following incident that just occurred in my past session for Baldur’s Gate: Descent into Avernus. The players traversed the Scab prior to entering the Bleeding Citadel to find the Iron Flask amongst the deceased Night Hag’s obejects in her lair. They released the Fiendish flesh golem and killed it due to it not being their’s and attacked them so says the module. They still held onto it after the wizard identified it and realized its potential for demons if anything. So they eventually came across the diggers trying to dig out the Crokek’toeck. They killed them and reached the beast themselves to capture it in the Iron Flask instead. The bit I’m concerned with is they intend to use the creature as a trump card and have it serve them in battle for the hour use.

What I don’t understand is that the item doesn’t explicitly state that this is a charm on the creature to force its friendly position towards the party and adhere to their commands. The crokek’toeck has immunity to charm and confuses me as I presume the Iron Flask technically charms said captured entities to obey their temporary master(s). Due to the fact the item neglects to state this; do I proceed with the crokek’toeck being immune to the friendly nature once it pops out and proceeds to flee, attack, etc the party, or is this Flask meant to override that immunity and it works as they think it would, therefore obeying the party? I’m seeking a logical answer prior to flavored suggestions.

Is Charm Person obvious?

Charm Person has verbal and somatic components. Is there anything in the rules as written that defines how obvious those verbal and somatic components are? Would it be obvious the caster was casting a spell from 5′ away? From across a crowded room?

I’m specifically interested in an answer based on the rules as written, although interpretation and individual opinion is not unwelcome.