How do I balance game interactions between a giant mecha that can level cities and its pilot?

I have had recurring trouble with a subject I like, and would like to implement into my games, but can’t find a good way to do so: mechas (big huge robots)

From a system point of view, it is usually quite easy: just a big suit of armor with specific weapons. The pilot has to be inside to be able to use it, and it is too big to use just anywhere. Most systems can allow it.

However, I can’t find a good game balance for it. The main problem is that the whole “normal person when outside the suit / super-destruction-machine when inside the suit” makes too much of a difference in-game. For example, any challenge when the pilot is outside the suit is a trifle when in the suit; while any challenge for the suit is impossible for the pilot. It ends up feeling like playing two games at the same time: the mechas’ game, and the pilots’ game.

I have tried reducing the difference between the pilot and suits (making the pilots stronger and/or the suits weaker), but then the suits have almost no use, and the players end up almost never using them.

I have tried mainly in BESM (since it is already implemented), D&D, and even tried to develop my own system (with Mecha/pilot classes and perks). I’m looking for a Gundam/Front Mission style, i.e. mechas are big and powerful, can potentially be destroyed by well-equipped and organized infantry, but are mainly in their own world (mecha vs mecha)

So the question is: how would you balance a game focused on mechas?

How do I write a tooltip for this list of cities?

distanceToSanFrancisco[s_] :=   QuantityMagnitude[   TravelDistance[cityList[[859]], Interpreter["City"][s]]] (* table1 takes a while to run on my system*) table1 = Table[{cityList[[k]],      distanceToSanFrancisco[cityList[[k]]]}, {k, Length[cityList]}]; citiesWithin[range_] :=   Module[{s = {}},    Do[If[table1[[k, 2]] <= range, s = Join[s, {cityList[[k]]}]], {k,      Length[cityList]}]; s] (*This lists all cities in California that are within `range` of San Francisco.*) radius = 25; tolerance = 0.05; a1 = GeoDisk[    QuantityMagnitude[     LatitudeLongitude[Interpreter["City"]["San Francisco"]]],    Quantity[radius, "Miles"]]; a3 =   Complement[    citiesWithin[radius*(1 + tolerance)],    citiesWithin[radius*(1 - tolerance)]    ]; Table[a3[[k]] -> distanceToSanFrancisco[a3[[k]]], {k, 1, Length[a3]}] Show[a2, GeoListPlot[a3, PlotMarkers -> Point], ImageSize -> Medium] 

This last one is what I want the tooltips on. For the red points around San Francisco, ideally I would like to get just city name. TIA

Accurate Population Scale of Forgotten Realms Cities

Do the maps of cities in the 3rd Edition Forgotten Realms Campaign Books accurately reflect the statistics of those cities?

I recently decided to use the city of Everlund from the Forgotten Realms campaign setting as a model for a location in a one-shot scenario – the setting was not exactly the same as Faerun, but it was a similar generic setting of my own creation with a similar version of the city as the focus of the story. Upon comparing both the map and the statistics provided in the book (the information of which is also available online), however, I found that the numbers did not seem to line up to me:

Map of Everlund

Population: 21,388

The population seems far too large, and the physical city and number of possible residences far too small, for them to match relative to each other. I have not counted the exact number of buildings, but estimate a couple hundred – a number that would suggest around 100 people per house. Even with the expectation that people live in larger families and with a higher density-per-house than our modern real-world, this seems like an absurd number. I might expect it to be something more like an order of magnitude smaller. Making sure that this was not just an isolated case, I found that most other cities with drawn maps seemed to have a similar situation.

I’ve considered that the creators might have intended these maps to not be taken literally, but rather abstractly – each square not representing a literal single building, but rather the general shape of areas being taken as general districts. This does not really seem to make sense, though, when you consider what they have detailed – individual bridges, roads, larger key buildings, and an important river, all drawn to scale and with an appropriate measuring ruler in the bottom corner. If this is meant to be taken abstractly, it is certainly hard to wrap my head around.

Are the maps simply too small for their statistics? Are they actually reasonable, contrary to my beliefs? Are they meant to be literally accurate or interpreted more broadly?

How did elven cities like Myth Drannor or those of Evermeet feed their populations?

In the AD&D supplement book for elves, it is said that elves eat little meat, do not raise livestock, and survive on the fruits of the forest.

This raises the problem of feeding any population larger than a small village. We also know that cities like Myth Drannor or Leuthilspar (Evermeet) had populations reaching over 40,000.

With such large urban centers, how did they feed themselves?

Does localised content between two cities in the same country cause duplicate content issues for search engines?

I realize this question is very similar to many questions already asked, but please bear with me as I haven’t been able to find any answers that apply to my situation specifically.

Basically I’m building a site that is split in two because once a user arrives on the site, they’re asked to choose their location and then they will be taken to the content for that location. The content is nearly identical for both locations, as there are only minor details changed (like price and address, etc.)

The difference here is that the two locations are two different cities within the same province of the same country. So a lot of the answers I’ve found don’t quite apply as they’re targeted more for different countries or languages.

First I’ll explain how I’ve built the site. It’s built on WordPress and just uses one domain, no subdomains or anything. There’s a landing page that has a link to each location. Upon choosing a location, you’re taken to the homepage for that location, which is the “Parent page” for that half of the site. All of the other pages for that location are children. A nav bar is served up based on the location you’ve chosen so that only links to that location are available. The URLs look like this:

mydomain.com/location-1/location-1-contact

mydomain.com/location-2/location-2-contact

My question is, do I need to be worried about duplicate content with Google, and how do I make sure that the correct location’s pages are being served to the correct people?

I’ve found a few solutions to similar questions, such as:

  1. rel="alternate" hreflang="x" but this seems to be more for targeting different languages or at least different countries, which is not my case. As far as I understand this tag, I’d be putting in the same info for both locations anyway.

  2. canonical also doesn’t quite fit as I understand that it dictates which content is the “main content”, however for me neither is the “main” content, it just depends on where the user is located. I want whichever location they’re searching for to be prioritized.

Maybe I’m just misunderstanding how some of this works, and maybe I have nothing to worry about at all. But I’ve been reading and researching for a while and I can’t find anything that speaks to my specific situation and I don’t want to get penalized for duplicate content.

Thanks in advance for the help!

Cities and Players, what to prepare? [on hold]

So this is going to be a very open-ended question about city design(/description) and what players tend to ask about their surroundings. In my experience, players tend to be extremely curious about the most random things and jump past plothooks often enough. I am fine giving them that agency, and would like it if they could enjoy the directions in which they explore their surrounds in the same session. (instead of me trying to make an impromptu setting before fleshing it before the next session)

What are some of the more common questions that players tend to ask about Cities?

I have a whole notebook for random character life-stories that I can reference when players hang onto an NPC who was initially not important, but I have nothing similar for cities.

As a player what are the common questions that you would ask about a city you just entered ? Or more generally how can I properly flesh out any random city ?

*I understand that different people will have different questions and I am fine with that as I would like to make a general guideline that I can follow when I design cities in future sessions.

Precision about distance between cities for “Glorious Reikland”?

I start the creation of a campaign for WFRP4e settled in the Reikland, the main country of the core rulebook. I use the map in order to create a path for caravaners, but I need to know distances between cities. I looked up for a map caption like the image below but found nothing. Same for the book section “Glorious Reikland p267.

enter image description here

Since I do not have information about the “size” of the country, I can’t guess. Is there any information, clues or anything else that allow me to deduce the distance between other cities ?

Map of Reikland

Why are cities (e.g. Diamond Bar) over-represented in Google Analytics?

When I look at our web site breakdown by city I see that a city named “Diamond Bar” is supposedly responsible for a huge 20% of pageviews for some pages. This is with a significant sample size (30,000 uniques), and I know there can’t be that disproportionate number of users in Diamond Bar as we have an internationally popular web site.

This city jumped from zero for the month of July to 1,000 visits / day in mid-August.

I think this must be inaccurate, but I wonder why GA is this off, does anyone have any insights?

can i calculate time of finding optimum of travel salesman problem with super computer and can i know that is limit of cities to now computers?

i want to know the real limit of our computational power that we have now what is the limit of cities that i can reach with optimum sol. i believe that first computer is 10^19 process in second

and can i calculate the time that it will take by looking to connections of directed graph ? and tell time by this power 10^19

as i can edit real graph of problem and delete cities of it