What tier are Path of War classes?

I know what class tiers are, and I know what tier most Pathfinder classes are. However, I have recently discovered Path of War, an alternative rule system published by Dreamscarred Press. It introduces many new classes to the game, and I don’t think I know the system well enough to judge every one of them without witnessing them in play, which I haven’t done yet.

On the other hand, I want to know which of those classes are actually good and which are not.

So, which tiers do Path of War classes belong to?

Are Path of War classes a good fit for beginner players?

I have just recently researched Path of War, an alternative rule system published by Dreamscarred Press. It looks very interesting and, for a few reasons, looks like one of the best-fitting classes for beginner players:

  1. PoW classes aren’t too complex. You don’t need to explain too many rules, and explaining how maneuvers work shouldn’t take too long either.
  2. PoW classes are potent. They seem able to achieve what is written in their descriptions — at least my fellow players in my current game achieve what they are supposed to.
  3. "Going nova" is not an issue. Pathfinder has a plethora of classes with abilities expendable on a per-day basis, and resource management is very hard for beginners. This often leads to level 1 Wizards burning all their spells in the first combat and then being useless for the entire day. In PoW, classes refresh their maneuvers after not being in combat for just one minute.
  4. You can ready different maneuvers every day. You can change your choice — well, to some extent. You are, in any case, less stuck in the same place than a Fighter who has chosen bad feats.

However, I haven’t watched beginner players use PoW classes, and hence I want to know if they are actually a good fit for complete beginners, those who have never played Pathfinder before or only have a few sessions behind their back.

Is the unofficial Arcane Puppeteer subclass balanced to play with official classes?

One of my players asked me to play this subclass.

It is written there that it has not been playtested, so I am a bit scared to allow him to play that class.
Do you know if it is safe to play? Or more in general, do you have any tip to identify the strength of a class before playing it?

Does the Sneak Attack class feature of the Generic Classes stack with the improved and greater versions of it?

Generic Classes have the possibility to gain different class features in exchange of a bonus feat:

For the purposes of these classes, the following class features can be selected in place of bonus feats (unless noted, each may only be selected once).

The Sneak Attack class features that can be selected are:

Sneak Attack (Ex)

As the rogue ability, but +2d6 on damage rolls. Prerequisites: Hide 4 ranks, Move Silently 4 ranks.

Improved Sneak Attack (Ex)

Add +3d6 to your sneak attack damage. Prerequisites: Hide 11 ranks, Move Silently 11 ranks, sneak attack.

Greater Sneak Attack (Ex)

Add +4d6 to your sneak attack damage. Prerequisites: Hide 18 ranks, Move Silently 18 ranks, sneak attack, improved sneak attack.

Do these three class features stack together?

Inconsistent spellcasting benefits from prestige classes?

Am I reading these rules right? There seem to be some strange inconsistencies in the benefits some prestige classes grant to the base spellcasting class. Here are some examples, all from the 3.5 DM’s Guide (although the inconsistencies continue in other rulebooks).

Archmage (page 178) buffs spells per day and spells known, but doesn’t mention caster level:

When a new archmage level is gained, the character gains new spells per day (and spells known, if applicable) as if he had also gained a level in whatever arcane spellcasting class in which he could cast 7th-level spells before he added the prestige class level. He does not, however, gain any other benefit a character of that class would have gained (bonus metamagic or item creation feats, and so on).

Eldritch Knight (page 188) buffs spells per day and caster level but doesn’t mention spells known:

From 2nd level on, when a new eldritch knight level is gained, the character gains new spells per day as if she had also gained a level in whatever arcane spellcasting class she belonged to before she added the prestige class. She does not, however, gain any other benefit a character of that class would have gained (bonus metamagic or item creation feats, bard or assassin abilities, and so on). This essentially means that she adds the level of eldritch knight to the level of whatever other arcane spellcasting class the character has, then determines spells per day and caster level accordingly.

Loremaster (page 191) buffs all 3: spells per day, known, and caster level:

A loremaster continues training in magic as well as her field of research. Thus, when a new loremaster level is gained, the character gains new spells per day (and spells known, if applicable) as if she had also gained a level in a spellcasting class she belonged to before she added the prestige class. She does not, however, gain any other benefit a character of that class would have gained (improved chance of controlling or rebuking undead, metamagic or item creation feats, and so on). This essentially means that she adds the level of loremaster to the level of some other spellcasting class the character has, then determines spells per day, spells known, and caster level accordingly.

The possibility of prestige classes that buff all 3 is especially odd in the context of Sorcerers; I see no reason to continue leveling Sorcerer once you qualify for a prestige class. A Sorcerer 10/Loremaster 10 character gets the same spells per day, known, caster level, HD, base attack bonus, and saves (actually, slightly better Will) as a Sorcerer 20, in addition to the Loremaster class features. (By contrast, Wizards get bonus feats, which they’d give up by pursuing Loremaster.)

I misunderstanding the rules somehow?

Is this homebrew College of Echoes balanced compared to existing classes?

College of Echoes
While the other bardic colleges focus on music and its accompanying psychological effects, bard of this college see what music really is- vibrations in the air, the same as words and heat, and learn to manipulate those vibrations themselves. The wide variety of useful abilities they have makes them be considered extremely reliable by many, though their perceived reductionism of music and tendency to use their powers for pranks makes others think they lack dignity.

Persistent Sound
At level 3, as an action, you can touch a creature or object and inscribe a word of your choice. If you try to inscribe a word on a hostile creature, you must successfully make a melee spell attack against them. The word you inscribe glows dimly and says itself every few seconds in a voice and volume of your choosing. Whenever a hostile creature makes an attack roll, it suffers a penalty to its attack rolls equal to the number of words inscribed on it, as the noise distracts it. This has no effect on deafened creatures. A creature can use an action to scrape off all words inscribed on it. You learn 2 additional languages of your choice. You can erase any inscribed word by touching it as an object interaction.

This is a very specific but also very widely useful feature imo in the hands of a creative player. I don’t think the enemy inscription penalty is overpowered at all, because the squishy bard would have to spend several turns making meelee spell attacks, which might not even hit, for a relatively minor penalty, that can be gotten rid off all at once in an action, and they could take their chances with the help action or vicious mockery for a similar effect.

Onomatopoeia
At level 10, you can inscribe certain words to manifest magical effects. These effects occur even if a target is deaf. You can:

Woosh- As an action, you inscribe the word woosh onto a creature. Unless the creature is willing, you must make a melee spell attack first. On a hit, that creature must make a strength saving throw, moving 30 feet away from you on a failure or 15 feet on a success. The inscription then vanishes.

Sizzle- As an action, you inscribe the word sizzle onto an object or creature. If you inscribe it on an object, it heats up, and if it is made of a flammable material such as paper or wood, it will burn, other wise, it becomes hot enough to do 1d4 fire damage to any creature that touches it (so a weapon with sizzle inside would do an additional 1d4 fire damage on each hit). If you inscribe it on a creature, you must first succeed on a melee spell attack against them if they are not willing. At creature with sizzle inscribed on them takes 1d4 fire damage at the end of each of their turns. You cannot have more than 1 inscription of sizzle at the same time.

Boing- As an action, you can inscribe a creature or object with the word boing. The next time they take fall damage, they take no damage and immediately jump a distance upwards equal to the distance they fell. The inscription then vanishes.

Snap- As an action, you inscribe the word snap onto an object or creature. If you inscribe it on a creature, you must first succeed on a melee spell attack against them if they are not willing. A creature with snap inscribed on it takes 1d4 bludgeoning damage and must make a dexterity saving throw or fall prone. An object or structure with snap inscribed on it takes 8d4 bludgeoning damage. The inscription then vanishes.

While this feature does not consume resources, the relatively low amounts of damage mean it is not overpowered, especially at 10th level when the bard’s vicious mockery does 2d4 damage, compared to 1d4. Woosh does push back a creature a whole 30 feet, but both a meelee attack and a saving throw are involved, and if either fail the bard risks being attacked again. This is more useful for supporting allies, eg. inscribing sizzle on the fighter’s sword, or using snap to collapse part of the building the parties’ fighting in.

The Weight of Your Words
At 14th level, as an action, you can choose a creature within 120 feet of you. The air pressure above that creature greatly increases, making them feel far heavier. The creature’s speed is halved and they must make a strength saving throw at the beginning of each of their turns, and whenever they use the dash or disengage actions, or fall prone. These effects last for 10 minutes, or until you are dead or unconscious. Once you use this ability, you cannot do so again until you finish a short or long rest.

How do type classes make ad-hoc polymorphism less ad-hoc?

The title of the paper that introduced type classes is "How to make ad-hoc polymorphism less ad-hoc".

It seems the type classes approach is being compared to how OOP does ad-hoc polymorphism.

As far as I can tell, the paper never explains how type classes are less ad-hoc than OOP techniques like V-tables or prototype chains, or even has any comparison at all of the trade-offs between the two approaches.

What is non-ad-hoc about ad-hoc polymorphism via type classes?

Note: this is a somewhat objective question, as "ad-hoc" is here a technical term. From the paper, "Ad-hoc polymorphism occurs when a function is defined over several different types, acting in a different way for each type."

Classes with Grace as a class feature?

So I recently made an amusing discovery. Daring Outlaw is often regarded as the saving grace (rimshot) of the Swashbuckler class, and it has the Grace class feature (+2) as a requirement, meaning you can’t trade Grace away for any ACFs. But, the Duelist prestige class also gives you Grace +2 at level 4, letting you get around that!

However, Duelist is, to put it kindly, not fantastic, and four levels in it is a big investment for this exploit. Are there any classes (base or prestige) other than Swashbuckler and Duelist that give you Grace as a class feature?

Grappling – Ideas and Concepts (classes) [closed]

I list of thoughts of what part of classes could be good for grappling. Will probably be using Point buy with a Goliath, dump Wis and Int to 8. Not fully STUPID, but definitly a little slow and gullible. The lovable idiot. Str 16, Dex 12, Con 16, Cha 14 (not final, was thinking Bard and Barbarian) So, just wanted to chat.

Im NOT taking all these classes, just more of a list for class commitment that helps with Grappling

Barbarian – lvl 1 / 3 / 5 Rage, for Advantage. Bear Totem for Dmg Reduction, ASI (maybe Tavern Brawler for improvised attacks, but lots of choices) and Extra attack/Movement

bard – lvl 3 Expertise in Athletics, Cunning Words

rogue lvl 1-2 Expertise in Atheltics, Cunning Action (mobility)

fighter – lvl 2 Action Surge. Grapple 2 things or grapple and prone them? yes please

Monk – Lvl 5 Stunning Strike (Success plus tavern brawler is free grapple)

Warlock – Lvl 1 Pact of the Chain for Improved familiar. Yes, I know you can get familiar from other things, but its a single level dip and you get a better familiar. Familiar is basically get a helper for rolls.

Ive recently been trying to get back into D&D, there is a local Adeventure League group. Wanted to do a grappler (not necessarily PURE grapple, but main focus. Been toying around with some ideas. Was also thinking of Sorcerer or Wizard, maybe some kind of Touch Spell (shocking grasp) grappler. Or Barbarian rogue (grapple then shank them to death)

Ive been out a long time, anything else that helps with grappling? interesting feats, class abilites, synergies, etc…

Can a hybrid character replace his only encounter attack power belonging to one of his classes?

Assume a Paladin|Swordmage with Cha and Con dumping Int or a SwarmDriud|Runepriest with Wis and Con dumping Str. As the relevant ability is very low, it would make sense not to pick any power from the secondary class. However, hybrid rules say you must.
Is there a way around this?

I do not think Reserve Maneuver or multiclass power swaps work, but I am not sure.