D&D 5e inspiration dice as currency for PCs to improve their characters? [closed]

Has anyone heard of, or thought out, or even used D&D 5e inspiration dice as currency for PCs to improve their characters? I allow PCs to accumulate them, so it occurred to me, "why not let them buy a skill, feat, spell slot, etc… for ‘x’ number of I-Dice? Thoughts? Possible costs in I-Dice for each?"

Self-Adjusting Door Puzzle [closed]

So I had an idea for a number-based door puzzle that could readjust itself every time a wrong guess is made. Here’s the basic premise:

Given two numbers, find two more numbers in such a way that:

  • no number differs from any other number in the same way,
  • and none of these differences are part of the series themselves,
  • and no number is bigger than it has to be, but not zero.

It seems fully deterministic to me, so let me give you an example:

Given are two numbers (1, 4). The difference is 3. 2 is out because its difference from 1 is part of the series, and in itself would be the difference from 4. 3 is out because of its difference from 2 and 4 being the same, and that difference would be 1, which is additionally part of the series. 5 is not valid either, but 6 is. 7 is not valid due to its difference to 6 being part of the series, and 8 is invalid because of the difference between (6, 8) and (4, 6). However, 9 is valid, and concludes the series.

It seems simple enough for a door puzzle, and given the above set of rules, it seems absolutely deterministic. I was considering to give the following (more vague) clue to its solution:

No siblings differ alike, nor match they their differences, and none grow taller than they must.

I need it to sound like a riddle, but still be concise and accurate and its description of the puzzle. If anyone has any suggestions, I would greatly appreciate the help.

I suppose I have four questions for this community:

  • Is there a unique solution for any two starting numbers below 10?
  • Can you think of a more interesting variant, like perhaps by minimising the sum of the numbers (but not having any predetermined numbers given – (1, 4, 6, 9) being the best solution I found so far)?
  • It seems to me there should be some way to determine the two missing numbers in a way that minimizes the sum of all four, which is not the same as choosing the lowest possible numbers one after the other. Is there such a way?
  • Is there a better way to phrase the problem in a single sentence to my players, without being too obvious or sounding too scientific?

And some more example solutions for your convenience:

  • (3, 4) –> (9, 11)
  • (2, 5) –> (6, 13)
  • (1, 9) –> (3, 13)
  • (1, 3) –> (7, 12)
  • (1, 5) –> (7, 13)
  • (4, 6) –> (1, 13)
  • (8, 1) –> (3, 17)

Is cloudlayar a legit protection service? [closed]

I recently came across a very cheap protection service similar to Cloudflare called Cloudlayar: https://cloudlayar.com/

It’s a bit weird because the prices are too good to be true, no PayPal (so refund at their mercy), and they use Cloudflare to protect their own website…

Does anyone know what this company is? how good is their service? is it a scam?

p.s: I’m not asking for an "opinion", just trying to know if this service actually works and have customers

Thanks in advance

recommendation for a programable FPS game for training forces [closed]

I wish to develop a training simulator for army ground forces.

Basic concept is that they can save lots of training time and budget by going through a simulator phase before the physical war-training, explicitly, learning:

  • How to cooperate with one another and improve team work
  • Learn the basics of their weapons capabilities
  • Learn the territory of interest
  • Develop and practice different tactics

All this at a low cost relative to only physical training.

Where should I start? what platforms are available that can be used for effective war-training and can be easily adapted to new maps/fighting territories and warfare equipment?

Thanks!

How to incorporate the Dream Plane into Kalashtar PC playstyle (such as maybe multiclassing) [closed]

I play a Kalashtar War Domain Cleric and am interested in expanding on the Kalashtar’s connection to the Quori more.

Not looking for any particular solution, more of an interesting way to incorporate the DreamScape and Kalashtar lore with the Quori into the play and story of the campaign more.

Open to any wild ideas

Variant rule: how can we lighten the cost of chugging potions in battle? [closed]

So, we know how this works: potions are listed as magic items in the DMG, and to use a magic item, one must use activate magic item, which costs one action and, to the best of my knowledge, there’s no way to relieve such cost (a thief’s fast hands don’t apply since, again, this is a magic object and for some reason it’s wholly different).

Now, I’m sure most of us can relate to this this situation" you find yourself in the midst of a bloody battle, half-dead and surrounded by enemies, when a hope shines through the perils: your bag full of refreshing healing potions, which beg to be savored by your dusty lips. You extend your empty hand (or drop whatever you were holding since only one free interaction is allowed per turn and tidily stowing your sword consumes it… the ancients would say junky lex, sed lex), grab a delicious 4d4+4 health potion and prepare to consume your action in the process… "But wait" I hear you say, "Doesn’t it heal an average of 14Hp?" Indeed. "And don’t my enemies dish out an average of -whatever number higher or equal to 14-"? Right on the money. "So I can’t move or I’ll trigger free opportunity attacks – and the hostile creatures will still be able to reach me (if they have at least my speed) – but I can’t disengage or do any evasive meneuvers or I won’t be able to drink… So I can only chug and deplete my precious potions while they gank on me till they’ll inevitably reduce me to a pulp?" Bingo.

Healing potions are scarcely useful in battle, even compared to healing spells: despite being limited -to the number of spell slots left-, they also offer several ductile options: most are available from level 1 (healing word, cure wounds) and therefore ever more plentiful, they can be upcast (while one cannot chug more than one potion per turn), some cost a bonus action (healing word), and the strongest have an AoE healing (mass cure wounds*). The scale is so tipped in favor of spellcasters that even in campaigns with regular supplies of cheap, high level potions, they rarely compare to the dreaded healbot. How can we houserule more versatility and usefulness out of potions and rely less, possibly not at all, on healers?

Most common solutions I found were:

  1. Drink healing potions as a bonus actions, which definitely helps and resembles healing word, but, seems e bit too much and inconsistent (I mean, what about other potions?);
  2. Dodge&drink, a solution Hipsters&Dragons came up with, which lets you take the dodge action freely when you drink a potion (https://www.hipstersanddragons.com/drinking-a-healing-potion-in-combat/), which is neat, but won’t save you from any save-throw imposing moonbeam;
  3. If you retrieve a healing potion this turn and drink it the next one (with two separate free interactions), you don’t need to waste any action since drinking only takes a free interaction". Crawford debunked this possible solution (https://twitter.com/JeremyECrawford/status/805197509127598080), and didn’t the DMG establish that potions are magic items and you need to, somehow, activate them? Inconsistencies aside, this interpretation doesn’t really help in the heat of battle, does it?

So, what do you suggest?

What makes a dungeon? [closed]

I’m a game design student, currently writing an article about dungeons. I’ve done quite an amount of research about these, and found out there’s a lot of different definitions for them, some of which contradict themselves. So I’d like you to tell me what, in your opinion, makes a dungeon.

Which things are necessary to make a place a dungeon?

Which things will automatically make a place a non-dungeon?

Which things are making no difference and can be found both in dungeons and in non-dungeons?

Is the term dungeon about structure, theme, content, location, purpose, story or something else?

Well, I think you get the idea. Please try to elaborate as much as possible your answers, I’m not afraid of huge amounts of text. And don’t hesitate to post anything that comes to your mind. I’m searching for clues and inspiration, so reasonibly far-fetched and unpopular opinions are more than welcome 🙂

Theorycraft: What’s the most self-sufficient character possible? [closed]

So this is a theorycraft idea that’s been floating around my head for quite a while now: what’s the most self-sufficient character possible in D&D 5e? Assuming we use the game’s rules and lore/fluff of the "default D&D setting" as reference.

What do you mean by self-sufficient?

Let’s use a story as an example: imagine your new DM turned out to be an Evil Demigod who kidnaps you into the world of his D&D campaign. There’s an empty character sheet in front of you, and as soon as you fill it out (according to normal character creation rules), he’s going to reincarnate you as that character and start his evil campaign.

Now, as you mull over what kind of character you should create, you think about the few key pieces of information you found out:

  • The only way you can escape this hellish fantasy world is by beating the campaign
  • The DM wants you dead, but he can’t just go "Rocks Fall, everyone dies". He must kill you in an at least somewhat fair and legitimate manner.
  • The DM’s campaign is, in fact, beatable, and with the perfect strategy, the success rate is above 50% (dicerolls and RNG included).
  • The evil DM’s world follows the rules and lore of the game, so you can get away with cheesy exploits such as wish+simulacrum or coffelock. (You’ll see why they don’t matter in a second)
  • The DM will take it easy at first, so let’s assume that you’re able to survive the early levels and also find some kind of ridiculous cheese that allows you to reach level 20+ (You gain an Epic Boon for every 30’000 exp past lvl 20).

The Obstacles

So if we want to maximize our chances of making it through anything our evil DM throws at us, what problems do we need to solve?

1. Party Members

D&D is (I think) a game where you’re supposed to rely on your companions for solving problems you yourself can’t handle. However, it’s all but guaranteed that the DM will find a way to separate the party, possibly for years on end. So, everyone needs to be self-sufficient anyways.

2. Magic and the Weave

Magic in D&D is very powerful, capable of solving most problems. It also becomes completely useless once we find ourselves in an Dead Magic Zone. As far as i know, all magic in D&D depends on the Weave. This includes things like Ki, Psionics, and perhaps even Divine Magic. Wouldn’t it be a shame if an Eldrich Horror from the Far Realms came along and ate the entirety of the Weave for lunch? This would turn the entire multiverse into an giant Antimagic Field. But we still need a way to kill monsters immune to nonmagical bludgeoning/piercing/slashing damage! The Monk’s Ki-empowered strikes feature, as well as similar features such as the Warlocks Pact Weapon, were confirmed to be supressed in Antimagic Fields, so they’re out of the window. All that’s left are mundane means, Artifacts, or Deities. Speaking of Deities…

3. Divine Intervention

You might be tempted to rely on a God’s power – after all, spells cast by them aren’t suppressed by antimagic. Unfortunately, gods in D&D, especially in epic-level campaigns, tend to be surprisingly killable. Wouldn’t be it a shame if that Lovecraftian Horror slaughtered all the gods after eating the weave? If we want to be self-sufficient, we can’t rely on other people to grant us their power.

4. Artifacts

So, all that’s left to bypass physical damage immunity in the case of an Apocalyptic event that includes the destruction of the Weave, as well as any and all Gods, are Artifacts. They’re also incredibly rare, and we might never be able to find one. Especially if there’s an evil cult that, inspired by the magic-devouring Aberration from the far realms, seeks out to steal and destroy all Artifacts in existence? We can bet that our evil, evil DM will find a way to steal our Artifact Sword. In fact, he might take a page out of the Tomb of Horrors and teleport us into a danger zone while teleporting all of our equipment faaaar away! So, we can’t rely on any external items, because they WILL get stolen. Unless we have a 100% surefire way to prevent Artifacts from being stolen or destroyed…

5. Food, Water, Air and Aging

Living things tend to need these things to survive. But what if all the Gods are dead, and we’re stuck in a magic-devoid outer space for 10’000 years? Thankfully, this is an easy fix: be a Warforged! No need for food, water, or even air. You also technically don’t age, but take that Immortality Boon just in case you might start to rust.

*6. Sleep *

We don’t want to sleep, ever. It’s like begging our Evil DM to send assassins and/or thieves. Thankfully, Warforged remain fully conscious during their rest, so that problem’s solved.

7. Getting Lost.

Take the wanderer background ability. If magic doesn’t exist anymore, it can’t make you get lost.

What Class?

Here’s my analysis on potentially useful classes. Remember, we ideally want to be able to kill any monster in the game without having to rely on items, the weave, or the Gods not being dead. This section will also contain the questions I’m most curious about:

Artificer

Potential to attune to 6 Artifacts at once, or perhaps even craft your own Artifacts. But I don’t think they have a way to prevent their items from being stolen/teleported away?

Barbarian

Ancestral Guardian Barbs can deal non-magic Force Damage, but only when they protect other creatures. We can’t rely on always having another creature handy.

Do Zealot Barbarians lose their Divine Fury ability if their God Dies? Does Divine power still exist if all gods die? Do they even need a God? If they can still do the radiant damage without needing any Gods, then they’re amazing. Rage Beyond Death, paired with stacking the Epic Boon that lets you recover half of your max HP, will allow you to fight for days on end. Or more, depending on how many epic boons you stacked.

Bard

I doubt Bards will be very helpful without the Weave.

Cleric

Without their Gods, they’re useless. Did i miss anything?

Druid

Wildshape is suppressed in Antimagic Field. I don’t think Druids can do anything without the Weave.

Fighter

Eldritch Knights have the Weapon Bond Ability, which seems to be able to work with Artifacts! So, if you can find an Artifact weapon that’s hard to destroy (unlike the Sword of Zar***), this might be great for always having a viable weapon on hand. Provided you can get one in the first place.

Monk

Fluff text implies that Ki uses the Weave, so bye-bye Monk.

Paladin

Now, this depends: If we can have a Paladin that is empowered entirely by their Oath and cause, without needing any God, this might be perfect. The question is: without the Weave or Gods, would a Oath of Redemption Paladin still retain some of their non-magic abilities, such as Aura of Protection, Improved Divine Smite, Protective Spirit and Emissary of Redemption? If yes, this might be a clear winner. If no, too bad.

Ranger

A Horizon Walker Ranger has the "Planar Warrior" ability, which grants them mobility and a decent chunk of force damage – perfect, as the only monsters immune to force damage aren’t immune to nonmagical damage. It also draws on "the energy on the multiverse", which seems absolutely omnipresent to me. Unless there’s some Far Realms shenanigans involved, maybe.

Rogue

The Soulknife has A wellspring of psionic energy within you. I’m not sure if this mean they can use their psychic blades without the weave, given that psionics in general seems to be another form of weave-related magic in 5e. Psychic damage also isn’t as reliable as radiant or force.

The Phantom subclass can do extra Necrotic damage via to power of souls, but this isn’t a reliable enough damage type: what if I need to kill a demilich?

Sorcerer, Warlock and Wizard

All of these seem to be absolutely reliant on the weave/ their patrons being alive to do anything relevant. Of course, tell me if i missed something

Conclusion

Whew, this has become quite the wall of text, hasn’t it? Anyways, I wanted to ask you, fellow theorycrafter, to answer my questions under the "Classes" section, as well as help me find any further things i might have missed: anything to find the theoretical perfect character that can reliably make it through any circumstances.

Shouldn’t we move past repeating “rules do what they say and nothing more?” [closed]

More the start of a conversation than a real question. It’s a wall of text, so I thank you in advance if you reach the end.

So hear me out: I’ve lurked on this site for months, learning hidden rules, exploring audacious interpretations and studying new mechanics: the honeymoon is not over yet and I’m very grateful to the community. But I also have a bone to pick with ya all: under most questions I often find this mantra, repeated mindlessly as premise for any reasoning:

Rules do what they say and nothing more.

I get the intent: don’t interpret the text beyond its scope, or you’ll end up unbalancing the game. Absolutely. But most of the times it’s used to stop the conversation instead of providing a fruitful contribution.

Case in point: in my first answer regarding the uses and limits of Mage hand, I said:

[The spell’s text] mentions manipulate an object, open an unlocked door or container, stow or retrieve an item from an open container, or pour the contents out of a vial; is this all it can do? I don’t think so, because it adds later that the hand can’t attack, activate magic items, or carry more than 10 pounds. The description remains generic on the things you can do, but is very strict on what you cannot. Could the Mage hand hold a light living creature, like a mouse? It’s certainly not an object, but it wouldn’t make sense to forbid it. As I interpret it, it’s a phantasmal hand with very little strength (therefore no attacks or any effort beyond 10 pounds) and which can’t complete complex tasks (therefore no activating magic objects): beyond that, the player’s fantasy’s the limit, and it should be rewarded […].

I later realized that my example concerning a mouse was not as blatant as I thought, and in fact made for a different can of worms altogether. I can hear the rebuttals in the back: "The text says you can manipulate an object, so you can’t manipulate a mouse, your example is dumb and all that follows is voided". I’m sure some agree with my non-existent, pesky alter ego, but let me add something. If you can’t hold the mouse, what happens a player tries anyway? The manuals don’t offer an easy solution, so perhaps you could simply 1)Have the cantrip stop and the hand disappear; or 2)Have the living creature fall through the ghostly limb; or maybe 3)Have the hand become unresponsive for as long as it’s interacting with incompatible things (in this case, creatures). I’m sure you can come up with any number of different solutions, and at the moment your ruling may seem to harmonize the rule with the situation.

Then again your mischievous mage player could exploit your ruling in any number of ways. Case by case: 1)If any living creature interrupts the cantrip, couldn’t another player simply highfive it and interrupt it at every turn? "AntiMage hand maneuver is a go, let’s go clap the lil’ bugger". 2)If living things fall through the hand (and in a world with constructs and undead, have fun deciding what is living), could you also use it to scout for mimics? Actually, can the ghostly hand normally go through walls? How is the feeling of having the mage hand cross your body? Could the mage use the Mage hand to convince the king he is the ghost of his great grandfather, who eternally cursed his lineage by not adequately paying a party of adventurers for their services, and the spell can only be broken by emptying the royal treasuries onto the hand of the first random party of adventurers that show up at his presence? (I know there are easier ways, but we are squeezing all possible uses out of a measly cantrip just to make a point, come on). 3)Could you use your otherwise useless adventuring gerbil Jeremiah as a reliable counter to stop very specifically worded spells and magic items which can’t possible operate with living creatures, displaying "Error 403, forbidden" when interacting with any?

You see what I mean, any number of possible interpretations both in line with and beyond the text has an infinite number of unforeseen ramifications, and even though every DM can come up with a different answer, I think the only wrong answer would be "You can’t do that at my table because rules don’t give a definite answer, so change your action or lose the turn". That’s how everyone’s morale wilts and how one disincetivizes any experimentation, to the detriment of the game as a whole.

Beside, shouldn’t we stop pretending the manuals were some kind of holy text providing every answer to every situation, a perfectly calibrated machine which was as frail as to crumble at the flimsiest of pokes? Let’s be honest here. Many spells are situational at best, same as several subclasses (and I don’t want to touch upon the OG ranger) and races (there’s a special place in hell for human variants); many (if not most) feats are borderline useless, and several of the conjurable creatures from find familiar are best left at the end of the PHB where they belong. The list could go on and on. And I’m not proclaiming that playing optimally is the only sensed way to (that discussion would need an other post twice as long), but for a player there’s no worse feeling than being locked up in a useless choice and drag behind the rest of a more traditional party for the unforgivable sin of experimenting with existing mechanics. Shouldn’t a DM touch up the weakest parts of the books to improve everyone’s experience at the table? After all, the first page of the contents of the DMG says:

The D&D rules help you and the other players have a good time, but the rules aren’t in charge. You’re the DM, and you are in charge of the game.

Getting back on track, what I meant is: no amount of text could cover every possible mechanic and interaction in the game. As a real life law student (please be lenient in the comments), I can assure you, however you spell a rule, it will be always be open to abuses both in favor and against its subjects, which is why one of the often underestimated roles of a DM outside homewbrewing is to do metaruling, that is to rule on rulings: when to strictly enforce a rule, when to extend its bounds and when to forgo it entirely precisely for the sake of balance. That is why we need human judges to interpret and apply laws in real life (for as long as machines will become smart enough to take that role): whenever the text falls short, understanding why a rule exists and interpreting its intent in a fair way is the way to apply both Rules As Written and Rules as Intended. They are two sides of the same coin after all. Blind faith on the manuals simply can’t solve every problem arising on the table, and even the most conservative interpretation must withstand possible future complications or be overruled when its blindsides have been exposed. No amount of tweets from the almighty JC (which I think are both a blessing and a bane since, again, the game is not perfect at all) can solve any situation in one optimal, definitive way. So let’s stop pretending there is this authentic way to play D&D vanilla.

Sometimes one has to think outside the box to understand what the box was all about.

Do you agree?