The 5e Inquisitive Subclass allows perception checks as a bonus action. Would that matter in a heavily obscured area during combat?

Let’s say an Inquisitive is in a fog cloud. By my understanding, advantage and disadvantage cancels out if you are fighting someone else in that cloud. But if you were able to make a bonus perception check (and succeed) before attacking, could that negate your disadvantage?

As far as I can tell, there are no direct rule applications but I just wondered if someone had any thoughts on it. I guess in my head, using your action to search for someone when you can’t see due to environmental conditions them isn’t that useful for attacking purposes. But if you were to use a bonus action (in effect searching and attacking near simultaneously) would that change anything?

Same question for attacking from outside said hazard. I search, find, and shoot arrow – negate disadvantage?

Can I get Combat Casting as a bonus feat in one level or less?

I need Combat Casting as a prerequisite for another feat.

I really do not want to waste a precious feat slot on this terrible feat, particularly since I should have enormous Constitution.

Therefore, I want to get it as a bonus feat. The best I can find for this is becoming a 2nd-level duskblade, but two levels is a lot to pay—even more than a feat slot. The other benefits of the duskblade class simply don’t do enough for me to justify that investment.

So I want an alternative. Some possible answers:

  • A base class that gets Combat Casting at 1st.

  • An alternate class feature, substitution level, variant, or other option for a 3rd-level barbarian or druid, or 2nd-level cleric or wu jen (I’m planning on two levels of barbarian or druidic avenger, and a level each of cleric and wu jen, so one more level of any of these is better than fine for me).

  • A prestige class that gets Combat Casting at 1st (though the prerequisites are likely to ruin this as an efficient answer, and my character per se is only 6th level and thus has very limited access to prestige classes, I’d be interested in knowing).

  • A magic item that grants Combat Casting (this need not be limited to something affordable for a 6th-level character, though obviously my immediate problem is best solved by something that is).

  • Since this is for a feat and I’ll always need Combat Casting to use it, spells, powers, etc. etc. probably will not work—but if there are such options that can legitimately offer 100% uptime, I’d be interested (my character is going to be permanently enraged and probably unable to use these, but I’d still be interested).

  • I might be convinced by two levels in something else that’s a stronger dip than duskblade. Not my preferred solution, but certainly better than nothing.

  • Any of the above that explicitly counts as Combat Casting for the purpose of meeting a feat’s prerequisites.

Non-epic Wizards of the Coast-published 3.5e material, as well as Dragon or Dungeon magazine is acceptable. I want something that just says “you get the Combat Casting feat,” or “you count as having the Combat Casting feat for prerequisites.” Shenanigans to get extra feat slots (Elder Evils, DCFS, whatever) are not acceptable. Likewise, various suggestions that maybe with DM approval you could get a custom feature that might include Combat Casting—for example, the suggestion about feat-granting magic items from Arms & Eqiupment Guide—aren’t in-bounds for this question. And similar bonuses or whatever are of zero interest unless they explicitly count as Combat Casting for prerequisites.

If a creature spawns more creatures during the combat, how does it affect the challenge rating? [duplicate]

I’m trying to balance a combat encounter for my players (in this example 5th lvl, 10 characters). I want to use the Sword Wraith Commander (SWC) (MTF, p. 241). The SWC has a CR of 8 but with its call to honor ability, it can summon 1d4+1 sword wraith worriors (SWW) which have a CR of 3 each. One CR 8 monster is rated as a trivial combat encounter but adding five CR 3 monsters makes it deadly.

This raises the question: Is the ability to summon up to five CR 3 monsters included in the CR 8 rating (meaning the total combat with the SWC and up to 5 SWW has a CR of 8) or do we count the CR’s independently?

How do I introduce an inexperienced player to the FATE combat system?

One of the things that I love about the FATE system is how flexible it is; even given the less than crunchy nature of the system, you have options galore. That’s given one of my players analysis paralysis: in combat, she can’t really function all that effectively and it’s not satisfying to her coming from a very limited gaming background and all of that being DnD 4e where her options are laid out before her.

I’m looking for ways to give a player more structured options during play; sort of a cheat-sheet or combat strategy-guide for the narrative paradigm FATE inhabits. Narrative ideas for storytelling combat are good, but some sort of cheat sheet of structured fight options would go very far in helping her to get her mind around the combat concepts and options.

Any ideas on how I might be able to help her rectify this? She’s playing a Red Court Infected in my Dresden Files game.

Update

I took Mxyzplk’s suggestion below, and created the Action Cards for the combat options that she had, and it worked perfectly!

If anyone else wants to do this for their FATE game, I’ve made the Word Templates available, with instructions included.

Is there a feat or a class feature in 3.5e that is similar to Step Up (Combat) from Pathfinder?

I am looking for a feat that in some way resembles Step Up from Pathfinder:

Step Up (Combat)

You can close the distance when a foe tries to move away.

Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1.

Benefit: Whenever an adjacent foe attempts to take a 5-foot step away from you, you may also make a 5-foot step as an immediate action so long as you end up adjacent to the foe that triggered this ability. If you take this step, you cannot take a 5-foot step during your next turn. If you take an action to move during your next turn, subtract 5 feet from your total movement.

My goal is to prevent a caster to take a 5-foot step away from me while we are engaged in melee, in this way he/she is forced to cast defensively.

I understand that a weapon with reach could easily do the trick, but I can not consider this options.

So, is there any Feat or Class Feature that could help?

Does mounted combat require a willing rider as well as mount?

A party is traveling on a path through a woods when they are simultaneously attacked by a group of orcs and a single, overly-clever ogre. The ogre grabs the party’s fighter (successful grapple attack) and announces his intention to move 20 feet (speed halved) among the orcs, subjecting the fighter to multiple opportunity attacks as she leaves their reaches.

"Wait!" protests the fighter. "The opportunity attacks rule says…

You can make an opportunity Attack when a Hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach…[but you] don’t provoke an opportunity Attack when you Teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your Movement, action, or Reaction.

"Since you are moving me, the orcs cannot attack me as you drag me past them."

"Hmmm…" considers the ogre. Knowing full well that specific beats general, he tries to think of a case in which something can explicitly provoke opportunity attacks even if it is being moved. "Aha!" he says brightly. "The grapple rules say…

When you move, you can drag or carry the Grappled creature with you

The ogre easily flips the fighter across his shoulders. "Now I am carrying you."

"That doesn’t matter."

"If I am carrying you, I can be your mount. And the mounted combat rules say…"

if the mount provokes an opportunity attack while you’re on it, the attacker can target you or the mount.

"That’s ridiculous," says the fighter indignantly. "First of all, you can’t provoke an attack of opportunity from the orcs unless you and they are Hostile, and clearly you are allies."

"You don’t know that," says the ogre. "We are actually from different tribes, and it was a coincidence that we both ambushed your party at the same time. If we win, I expect we will fall to fighting one another over your loot." The orcs nod in agreement. "Besides, the DMG definition of Hostile is…

A hostile creature opposes the adventurers and their goals but doesn’t necessarily attack them on sight.

"Setting aside the adventurer-centric language, as NPC’s these orcs and I oppose one another’s goals. As I move around, they could certainly choose to attack me rather than you."

"Point taken – but you still can’t be my mount."

"Why not? The Mounted Combat rules say…

A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount, using the following rules…"

"I am a willing creature," says the ogre, "I am at least one size larger than you, and, as you will note from your position atop my shoulders, I have appropriate anatomy. It is still my combat turn, and I say that I am your mount."

"That’s not for you to decide! I mean, you can’t be my mount against my will! It says a creature can serve as a mount, and you are most definitely not serving me."

"There’s no game definition of serve."

"Right, so we go with the common English meaning of ‘being in service to’, ‘following commands’."

"I rather prefer the English meaning of ‘able to be used as’; like after the orcs kill you, your helmet will serve as my chamber pot."

The rules make it clear that to be a mount, the creature has to be willing. But does the rider have to be willing as well?

And if the rider does have to be willing, does that mean a rider that has been rendered unconscious no longer counts as a rider for the purposes of mounted combat? (an unconscious person on a moving horse could not receive opportunity attacks because they could no longer consent to be a rider?)

Do you make death saving throws out of combat?

Death saving throws are made on each turn where you are dying and not stable. However, the rules specifically talk about making saves during combat rounds – so what about after combat? Two PCs are up, three are dying, and the lich is defeated. For the three that are dying:

  1. Do combat turns continue as normal until all are either stable are dead?
  2. Since combat is over, do the dying PCs make their saves consecutively until they are dead/stable without interference from other PCs? (a combat round in which a save is normally made is only 6 seconds)
  3. Do the PCs automatically stabilize?

I think the closest interpretation is option 1, but at my home game we’ve house-ruled to work with option 3 (barring exigent circumstances like a PC dying alone somewhere in a trap) because we assume that in the majority of cases a party can easily stabilize their companion or the PC will make their save.

I’m looking for a rule stating explicitly how death saves work outside of combat, or a wiser interpretation than my own.

Can Combat Flexibility satisfy prerequisites for permanent feats?

Can the feat a Fighter gains from Combat Flexibility satisfy the prerequisites for other feats you gain at level-up?

For example, Quick Shield Block requires Reactive Shield. If your Combat Flexibility feat is Reactive Shield, can you take Quick Shield Block during your level-up, then change your Combat Flexibility feat to something else the next day?

How do I handle initiative when a new force joins a combat that’s already in progress?

I am DMing a small hunger-games-like adventure where there are multiple parties of NPC who also are participating. It is pretty likely that the PCs will happen upon some of the NPCs fighting some monsters.

How do I handle the PCs joining the fight, do I roll initiative all over again? Do I just roll for the new combatants and add them to the round?


Also see this similar question for Pathfinder:
How to handle some new NPCs who enter a fight in progress?