Is this Dryad race balanced when compared to officially published races?

In a similar vein to these two questions, I’ve made my own Dryad race, but without subraces for right now. I based the very basics off of tieflings, but replaced the damage resistance with the Speech of Beast and Leaf and Fey traits, as well as modifying the spells gotten in the tiefling three-tier spell progression; finally, I modified the languages known, and the +1 to Int went to Wis instead.

Is this race balanced when compared to officially published races?

If it is too weak, I was considering making the Speech of Beast and Leaf trait just make the dryad always under the effect of Speak with Animals spell, and grant a similar effect for plants. If they were still too weak, I was also considering adding either Charm Person or some other charm effect. If they were too strong, I’d get rid of one or two of the Forest Legacy spells.

Sapling Dryad

Speed. 30 ft.
Ability Bonuses. CHA 2, WIS 1
Age. Dryads mature much slower than most other races, and live much longer. They achieve maturity at age 100 and may live indefinitely if they are not killed. Most Saplings are between 50 and 200 years old.
Alignment. Dryads generally do not care for much outside their forests, but those that do are usually Good aligned.
Size. Dryads are usually slightly shorter than most humans. Your size is medium.
Darkvision. Accustomed to twilit forests and the night sky, you have superior vision in dark and dim conditions. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.
Speech of Beast and Leaf. You have the ability to communicate in a limited manner with beasts and plants. They can understand the meaning of your words, and can respond by communicating simple ideas.
Forest Legacy. You know the Druidcraft cantrip. Once you reach 3rd level, you can cast the entangle spell as a 2nd-level spell; you must finish a long rest in order to cast the spell again using this trait. Once you reach 5th level, you can also cast the pass without trace spell; you must finish a long rest in order to cast the spell again using this trait. Charisma is your spellcasting ability for these spells.
Fey. You have two creature types: humanoid and fey. Because of this, you have advantage on saving throws against being charmed, and magic can’t put you to sleep.
Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common, Elvish, and Sylvan.

How secure is pass compared to Keepass?

Is pass a real alternative to Keepass in terms of security?

While Keepass has its own built-in encryption, pass relies on GPG to secure your passwords. GPG is obviously recognized as providing excellent security for transferring data over insecure networks, when the threat model is a MITM. But is GPG still a reliable way for securing local files on your computer? Keepass goes to some length to thwart potential attack vectors, such as making typed passwords harder to get with a keylogger and protecting its memory. Is pass with gpg agent more or less secure?

Also, if the private key which decrypts your passwords is just a file on your computer, is it really secure? I guess you can simply put a passphrase on the key, but I get the impression that it’s dangerous for someone to get your GPG key even if they don’t know the passphrase. Besides, Keepass has additional features like using a key file to unlock. Is there a security benefit to Keepass’s approach over pass?

Is this homebrew College of Echoes balanced compared to existing classes?

College of Echoes
While the other bardic colleges focus on music and its accompanying psychological effects, bard of this college see what music really is- vibrations in the air, the same as words and heat, and learn to manipulate those vibrations themselves. The wide variety of useful abilities they have makes them be considered extremely reliable by many, though their perceived reductionism of music and tendency to use their powers for pranks makes others think they lack dignity.

Persistent Sound
At level 3, as an action, you can touch a creature or object and inscribe a word of your choice. If you try to inscribe a word on a hostile creature, you must successfully make a melee spell attack against them. The word you inscribe glows dimly and says itself every few seconds in a voice and volume of your choosing. Whenever a hostile creature makes an attack roll, it suffers a penalty to its attack rolls equal to the number of words inscribed on it, as the noise distracts it. This has no effect on deafened creatures. A creature can use an action to scrape off all words inscribed on it. You learn 2 additional languages of your choice. You can erase any inscribed word by touching it as an object interaction.

This is a very specific but also very widely useful feature imo in the hands of a creative player. I don’t think the enemy inscription penalty is overpowered at all, because the squishy bard would have to spend several turns making meelee spell attacks, which might not even hit, for a relatively minor penalty, that can be gotten rid off all at once in an action, and they could take their chances with the help action or vicious mockery for a similar effect.

Onomatopoeia
At level 10, you can inscribe certain words to manifest magical effects. These effects occur even if a target is deaf. You can:

Woosh- As an action, you inscribe the word woosh onto a creature. Unless the creature is willing, you must make a melee spell attack first. On a hit, that creature must make a strength saving throw, moving 30 feet away from you on a failure or 15 feet on a success. The inscription then vanishes.

Sizzle- As an action, you inscribe the word sizzle onto an object or creature. If you inscribe it on an object, it heats up, and if it is made of a flammable material such as paper or wood, it will burn, other wise, it becomes hot enough to do 1d4 fire damage to any creature that touches it (so a weapon with sizzle inside would do an additional 1d4 fire damage on each hit). If you inscribe it on a creature, you must first succeed on a melee spell attack against them if they are not willing. At creature with sizzle inscribed on them takes 1d4 fire damage at the end of each of their turns. You cannot have more than 1 inscription of sizzle at the same time.

Boing- As an action, you can inscribe a creature or object with the word boing. The next time they take fall damage, they take no damage and immediately jump a distance upwards equal to the distance they fell. The inscription then vanishes.

Snap- As an action, you inscribe the word snap onto an object or creature. If you inscribe it on a creature, you must first succeed on a melee spell attack against them if they are not willing. A creature with snap inscribed on it takes 1d4 bludgeoning damage and must make a dexterity saving throw or fall prone. An object or structure with snap inscribed on it takes 8d4 bludgeoning damage. The inscription then vanishes.

While this feature does not consume resources, the relatively low amounts of damage mean it is not overpowered, especially at 10th level when the bard’s vicious mockery does 2d4 damage, compared to 1d4. Woosh does push back a creature a whole 30 feet, but both a meelee attack and a saving throw are involved, and if either fail the bard risks being attacked again. This is more useful for supporting allies, eg. inscribing sizzle on the fighter’s sword, or using snap to collapse part of the building the parties’ fighting in.

The Weight of Your Words
At 14th level, as an action, you can choose a creature within 120 feet of you. The air pressure above that creature greatly increases, making them feel far heavier. The creature’s speed is halved and they must make a strength saving throw at the beginning of each of their turns, and whenever they use the dash or disengage actions, or fall prone. These effects last for 10 minutes, or until you are dead or unconscious. Once you use this ability, you cannot do so again until you finish a short or long rest.

slow and jerky Graphics in 12.1 compared to older version 9.0

Consider the following piece of code

Manipulate[ Graphics[ {{Gray, Line@Table[RandomReal[1.5 {-1, 1}, {2, 2}], {10000}]}, Dynamic[Disk[{0.1 a Cos[a], 0.12 Sin[a]}, 0.1]]}, PlotRange -> 1.5, FrameTicks -> False, Frame -> True], {a, 0, 4 \[Pi]}] 

Running the above code I find that the Graphics in newer versions of Mathematica (e.g. version 12.1) are jerky and are rendered considerably slower. I ran the same code in version 9.0 and it runs relatively smoothly.

Does someone know why this is so? and what changed between the older and the newer versions of Mathematica?

How dangerous is this modified exhaustion compared to other harmful conditions?

In this question, I asked about the ramifications of monsters causing exhaustion:

How dangerous is exhaustion?

The answers concluded, that this would generally be very risky and dangerous.

I therefore decided to limit myself to a reduced threat version for the time being, which has the following modifications:

1. Limited effect

A target only gains exhaustion levels this way up to three levels. Any excess levels that would be caused this way are not applied.

And

2. Easy recovery

Taking a short rest or casting lesser restoration removes one level of exhaustion gained this way. Taking a long rest or casting greater restoration removes all levels of exhaustion gained this way.

How does this compare to other harmful conditions, such as stunned or paralyzed? Could I replace a stun or paralyze effect with one level of this reduced threat exhaustion and maintain a similar power level of the monster?

Is this revised homebrew Way of the Force monk subclass balanced compared to the official monk subclasses?

This is a monk to emulate be a force user, as from the Star Wars universe.
There is a spoiler from The Last Jedi film. I thought that the ability to telekinetically affect your environment is too cool a concept to be left to a couple of spells, so I wanted to create a martial class that could utilise these concepts.

The homebrew subclass in this question was finally playtested, so I can come back and try and refine it.

However, it was not an extensive playtest, so assessment from the community is appreciated. Prior to playing, I removed the multiple concentration feature of Force Prowess, leaving just the increased cost for more targets component.

The main issues seen were:

  • the contested checks resulted in both more rolling and more swinginess in whether the ability worked
  • using contested checks instead of saves meant that boss targets couldn’t circumvent the abilities
  • the ability to force something prone from range or to restrain something were both very powerful (especially against flying targets)

It was also unsatisfying to attempt to use an effect, just for it to fail, and my limited resource be wasted. As I was playtesting, I also found myself unwilling to use the Greater Telekinesis feature that lets you move creatures as an attack – maybe this was just due to the situations I was in, but it could just be a quirk of the combats I found myself in.

Additionally, I made some changes to Force Choke, but was unable to test it.

The changes I’ve made off the back of the above issues are changing all of the contested checks to Strength saving throws. This simplifies the text, and lets legendary creatures save from the effects, as well as reduce the amount of rolling. I also switched to using the player’s wisdom modifier instead of proficiency modifier for effects that I wanted to have a limited number of targets; I don’t think this should change too much, however.

I am still worried about the balance and feel of this subclass. It still has the issue that, quite often, a turn can be wasted trying to get a target to succumb to a force effect, and you fail consistently, wasting a lot of resources. Other subclasses get features they can use without resources; currently, this subclass only has Life Sense for that. Additionally, the ability to force something prone, or to restrain a target, from range gives a large incentive to just keep trying to get these powerful effects. The use of Strength saving throws instead of Dexterity saving throws is also a tad worrying; I’m not sure how unbalanced that is, though.

How balanced does this subclass seem in relation to officially published monk subclasses? What ways could it be improved to increase player satisfaction, with regards to resource expenditure, that official subclasses take into account?

Way of the Force

Monks that follow the Way of the Force have learnt how to use their ki to manipulate their surroundings with their mind, tapping into the energy that inhabits all things.

Telekinesis

Starting when you choose this tradition at 3rd level, you can use your ki to telekinetically manipulate the world around you. You gain the mage hand cantrip if you don’t already know it, and it is invisible.

Force Radius. A force radius of 30 ft that is centered on you defines where you can use ki specific force features. Your force radius increases to 60′ at level 11, and increases to 120 ft at level 17.

When you take the Attack action on your turn, you can forgo one of your attacks to spend 1 ki point to achieve one of the following effects against a Large or smaller creature, or an object, in your force radius.

  • Force Shove. The target must make a Strength saving throw. If they fail the save, you can do one of the following: knock the target prone, push the target up to half your Force Radius directly away from you, or pull the target up to half your Force Radius directly towards you. Unattended objects automatically fail this contested check, and if an object is held by a creature the creature makes the check.

  • Force Grab. The target must make a Strength saving throw. If the target fails the saving throw, it is grappled for one minute while you concentrate on the effect (as if concentrating on a spell). The target can use an action to try and break the grapple, repeating the saving throw.
    Unattended objects automatically fail this saving throw, and if an object is held by a creature the creature makes the save. An object held in this way can be moved to a location within your force radius up to half your force radius away from its origin point as an object interaction, and stay aloft in the air at the end of the move if you wish.

Greater Force Connection

Mind Powers. At level 6 your connection to the Force grows. You gain the ability to cast Charm Person (1 ki point) and Suggestion (2 ki points) using Wisdom as your spellcasting ability modifier. You can cast Charm Person at higher levels by spending one ki point for every level above first level you wish to cast it at, to a maximum total number of ki points equal to your wisdom modifier.

Life Sense. You can concentrate for a minute and learn the number of creatures within double your force radius, as well as their locations relative to your own. You do not learn any further information about these creatures, such as creature type or identity. You cannot detect either undead creatures or constructs with this feature.

Greater Telekinesis. Your Telekinesis abilities now work on Huge or smaller creatures and objects, and you can move creatures with Force Grab as well as objects. When moved in this way, you must use an attack to force the creature to make a Strength saving throw. If they fail, they are moved to a location of your choice within your force radius, following the same rules as moving objects with Force Grab. If they succeed, they are not moved.

Force Prowess

At 11th level you can apply the effects of Telekinesis to additional creatures and objects beyond the first by spending one ki point for each additional creature, up to a maximum of your wisdom modifier. When moving objects using Telekinesis, you can move any number of held objects using a single object interaction.
Your Telekinesis abilities now work on Gargantuan or smaller creatures and objects.
Finally, when you attempt to Force Grab a creature, you can increase the number of ki points you spend to 3 ki points and try to hold a creature more fully. Instead of being grappled when you succeed on the contested Force Grab check, a target is restrained, and repeats the contested check at the end of each of their turns. When you target additional creatures with this effect you must spend 3 additional ki points for each additional creature.

Force Mastery

At 17th level your mastery over your ki and the ki of others is legendary.

  • The radius of your life sense increases to 1 mile, and you can tell the creature type of each detected creature.
  • Creatures remain unaware of the effect you have had on their mind when you use Greater Force Connection abilities on them.

In addition to the features above, you can choose to gain one of the following features:

  • Force Choke. When a creature is held and restrained by your Force Grab, you can choose to start choking them if they are within half of your force radius. As an action on your turn, you can choose one creature that is under the effects of your Force Grab, and start choking them. They begin choking, and they become paralyzed for a minute. If they take any damage while paralyzed in this way, this effect ends on them. Additionally, you can use an action on following turns to crush the windpipe of any creature that has started choking in this way. They have to make a Constitution saving throw, or be reduced to 0 hit points. Creatures that don’t need to breathe cannot be reduced to 0 hit points in this way, but can still be paralyzed by this feature. If a creature manages to escape your Force Grab, they are no longer under any of the effects from this feature.

  • Force Lightning. As an action on your turn, you can spend 5 ki points to start spewing lightning at your foes, concentrating on this effect for up to one minute. A beam of lightning flashes out from your hand in a 5-foot-wide, 120-foot-long line. Each creature in the line must make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 10d6 lightning damage. On a successful save, it takes half as much damage. You can create a new line of lightning as your bonus action on any subsequent turn until your concentration ends, without having to spend further ki points. These lines of lightning vanish at the end of your turn.

  • Force Projection. As an action on your turn, you can cast Mislead by spending 5 ki points. Instead of the duplicate appearing where you are, however, you can choose to make the duplicate appear within 30ft of an ally you are aware of on the same plane of existence as yourself.

Is this homebrew roguish archetype Shadowdancer balanced compared to the other archetypes? [Version 2]

This is a follow up to my previous question: Is this homebrew roguish archetype Shadowdancer balanced compared to the other archetypes?

In short, I want to convert the 3.5e prestige class Shadowdancer into a 5e roguish archetype. I made an attempt in that previous question linked above, but there were some balance issues as pointed out by the accepted answer. I have made some revisions and wish to get another evaluation from the community.

As before, the parts in nested quotation format in italics are my design commentary.

Roguish Archetype: Shadowdancer

Operating in the border between light and darkness, shadowdancers are nimble artists of deception. They are mysterious and unknown, never completely trusted but always inducing wonder when met. Despite their link with shadows and trickery, shadowdancers are as often good as evil.

Flavour text taken from here (since NWN2 is where my knowledge of 3.5e primarily comes from anyway, so I might as well borrow their flavour text).

Summon Shadow. At 3rd level, you can summon a shadow, an undead shade. As an action, you summon a shadow, which uses the statistics from the Monster Manual, but its alignment matches yours and it cannot raise new shadows via Strength Drain. The shadow lasts until it is dropped to 0 hit points, at which point it disappears. If you summon another shadow whilst you already have a shadow summoned, the first one disappears. You can use this feature again once you finish a long rest.

I have decided to move Summon Shadow to 3rd level. It now uses the stats of a CR 1/2 shadow rather than a CR 5 wraith, but cannot raise new shadows, just like how I removed Raise Spectre from my wraith in version 1. My concern here is that Strength Drain might still be rather strong, given that it reduces the target’s Strength rather than just dealing damage; would removing the Strength reduction help to balance this? Another concern is that the shadow, as written currently, remains indefinitely, although I did at least ensure you can’t have more than one. Should it have a time limit?

Shadow Sight. At 3rd level, you gain darkvision out to a range of 60 feet. If you already have darkvision from your race, its range increases by 30 feet.

I still think this makes sense at 3rd level, similar to a Gloom Stalker Ranger gaining (or improving) darkvision at 3rd level. This has not been changed since version 1.

Shadow Illusion. At 3rd level, you can create visual illusions from shadows. You can cast silent image once per long rest.

I have chosen to move Shadow Illusion to 3rd level, because it did seem odd before that my archetype gained two things at 13th level. Also, my hope is that gaining it at 3rd level will counterbalance the weakness of the trait, especially since this archetype is now getting three things at 3rd level. I did consider increasing the number of uses, say 3 times per long rest or something, but I didn’t want to front load this archetype more than it already is now.

Shadow Jump. At 9th level, you gain the ability to step from one shadow into another. When you are in dim light or darkness, as a bonus action you can teleport up to 60 feet to an unoccupied space you can see that is also in dim light or darkness. You then have advantage on the first melee attack you make before the end of the turn.

This is unchanged since version 1, I’m still happy with this. It’s the same as a Way of Shadows monk, except the Shadowdancer has to wait for three more levels before they get it.

Shadowy Dodge. Starting at 13th level, you can dodge in unforeseen ways, with wisps of supernatural shadow around you. Whenever a creature makes an attack roll against you and doesn’t have advantage on the roll, you can use your reaction to impose disadvantage on it. You must use this feature before you know the outcome of the attack roll.

Taken directly from the Gloom Stalker ranger. I’m still happy with this from version 1, although now it’s all you get at 13th level rather than getting it alongside Shadow Illusion. Since it competes with Uncanny Dodge for the rogue’s reaction, I don’t see it as being too strong, especially since that’s all you get at this level now.

Hide in Plain Sight. Starting at 17th level, you can hide from your enemies even while being observed. You can take the Hide action even when you are in plain sight of the creatures you are trying to hide from so long as you are within dim light. However, you cannot try to hide using your own shadow.

This has now been moved to 17th level, since it did seem too strong as a 3rd level rogue feature. I’m comparing it to the warlock invocation Shroud of Shadow, which is basically at-will casting of the invisibility spell (which warlocks can only take upon reaching 15th level); this isn’t quite that, since you’re not actually invisible, but on the other hand, given how high the rogue’s Stealth modifier is likely to be at this level, it’s almost the same thing.

My main concerns are:

  • whether or not Hide in Plain Sight is balanced, meaning not too powerful, but on the other hand, not too weak (it is supposed to be a 17 level ability, the Shadowdancer’s capstone);
  • front loading the archetype with three abilities (although I’ve seen official archetypes do this, so it’s more about whether these three abilities are balanced at 3rd level);
  • whether the Summon Shadow feature is balanced (in particular regarding it’s Strength Drain and the fact that it lasts indefinitely).

I think I’m happy with everything else.

Is it possible to generate an equality function based on the data to be compared? [closed]

Two Booleans are equal if the’re the same value, two numbers similarly. Two sets are equal if they have the same elements. In case of checking two sets for equality we can use the following scheme/racket function:

(define (same-set? l1 l2)   (and (subset? l1 l2) (subset? l2 l1))) 

How would such a function be generated automatically?

The basic properties of an equivalence relation are:

Substitution property: For any quantities a and b and any expression F(x), if a = b, then F(a) = F(b) (if both sides make sense, i.e. are well-formed). Some specific examples of this are:

For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a = b, then a + c = b + c (here F(x) is x + c);

For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a = b, then a − c = b − c (here F(x) is x − c);

For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a = b, then ac = bc (here F(x) is xc);

For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a = b and c is not zero, then a/c = b/c (here F(x) is x/c).

Reflexive property: For any quantity a, a = a. Symmetric property: For any quantities a and b, if a = b, then b = a. Transitive property: For any quantities a, b, and c, if a = b and b = c, then a = c.

Is it possible to generate a function that obeys the above properties? Would that be enough? Could knowing the type of data help?

If you have any ideas on how to improve this question or tag it please comment.

Is this homebrew roguish archetype Shadowdancer balanced compared to the other archetypes?


Introduction

The Shadowdancer is a prestige class from 3.5e. Since, in 5e, prestige classes were replaced by class archetypes (for example, the Assassin prestige class from 3.5e is now represented by the Assassin roguish archetype in 5e), I’ve decided to have a go at converting the Shadowdancer prestige class form 3.5e into a 5e roguish archetype.

My goal is to create a roguish archetype that is balanced compared to the other RAW archetypes, but at the same time has the same flavour as the Shadowdancer from 3.5e. I don’t mind if it’s a strong archetype, but I don’t want it to be so strong that it’s unbalanced, broken even.

Insight into Design

Firstly, I chose Rogue as the base class for which this will be an archetype because half of the Shadowdancer’s features from 3.5e are part of the core Rogue class in 5e anyway, so it seemed like a natural fit.

Specifically, there’s Evasion, Uncanny Dodge (although in 3.5e that seems to be related to flanking, which is optional in 5e), Defensive Roll (which seems more like what 5e’s Uncanny Dodge does) and Slippery Mind (also improved versions of some of these, specifically Improved Uncanny Dodge and Improved Evasion).

The remaining features, Hide in Plain Sight, Darkvision, Shadow Illusion, Summon Shadow and Shadow Jump, these are what I believe should be the archetype features for my new roguish archetype. I’ve included commentaries below explaining my thought process when deciding how to represent these in 5e.

New Archetype

So, here’s what I’ve done to try to represent these features in 5e. The parts in nested quotation format in italics are my design commentary.

Roguish Archetype: Shadowdancer

Operating in the border between light and darkness, shadowdancers are nimble artists of deception. They are mysterious and unknown, never completely trusted but always inducing wonder when met. Despite their link with shadows and trickery, shadowdancers are as often good as evil.

Flavour text taken from here (since NWN2 is where my knowledge of 3.5e primarily comes from anyway, so I might as well borrow their flavour text).

Hide in Plain Sight. Starting at 3rd level, you can hide from your enemies even while being observed. You can take the Hide action even when you are in plain sight of the creatures you are trying to hide from so long as you are within 10 feet of dim light. However, you cannot try to hide using your own shadow.

I know this uses the same name as a ranger’s class feature, but the flavour of that feature didn’t feel the same as what the shadowdancer was going for at all, and this also seemed like a key feature of the shadowdancer to me (hence also why I wanted it to be their 3rd level feature), so I decided to come up with my own implementation of it, despite sharing the same name. Some of the wording (i.e. “dim light”) was based on these related Q&As. My concern is that this might be too powerful for a 3rd level feature; if this could end up being functionally the same as casting invisibility at will, then maybe this would be better off as the 17th level feature?

Shadow Sight. At 3rd level, you gain darkvision out to a range of 60 feet. If you already have darkvision from your race, its range increases by 30 feet.

This is taken directly from the Gloom Stalker ranger’s Umbral Sight feature. It seemed the best way to implement the Darkvision feature, a better fit in my opinion than Eyes of the Dark from the Shadow Sorcerer, which was my other choice. I didn’t want the rest of the Umbral Sight feature, though, since being hiding from enemies in the dark is what the Hide in Plain Sight feature above is for. That said, taking Umbral Sight as-is instead of Hide in Plain Sight might solve any problems from my concerns with it being too powerful, since if it’s good enough for Gloom Stalker rangers at 3rd level, it should be good enough here.

Shadow Jump. At 9th level, you gain the ability to step from one shadow into another. When you are in dim light or darkness, as a bonus action you can teleport up to 60 feet to an unoccupied space you can see that is also in dim light or darkness. You then have advantage on the first melee attack you make before the end of the turn.

This is exactly Shadow Step from the Way of Shadows monk. Hence 9th level seems appropriate given that a Way of Shadows monk would have had this at 6th level.

Shadow Illusion. At 13th level, you can create visual illusions from shadows. You can cast silent image once per long rest.

This seems kinda weak to me. I’m not sure whether I should make it stronger, like having it be once per short rest, or adding more spells like Shadow Arts from the Way of Shadows monk, or whether it should be moved to be an earlier feature, perhaps something gained at 3rd level? The solution I’ve gone with is having it be a ribbon feature alongside Shadowy Dodge (below), taken from the Gloom Stalker ranger, since it seemed to fit the Shadowdancer’s theme.

Shadowy Dodge. Starting at 13th level, you can dodge in unforeseen ways, with wisps of supernatural shadow around you. Whenever a creature makes an attack roll against you and doesn’t have advantage on the roll, you can use your reaction to impose disadvantage on it. You must use this feature before you know the outcome of the attack roll.

Taken directly from the Gloom Stalker ranger. As I said above, I gave the Shadowdancer this because it fits them thematically, and Shadow Illusion by itself didn’t seem like quite enough. Given that Gloom Stalker rangers get it at 15th level, it didn’t seem a problem for Shadowdancers to have it at 13th level, especially since it denies them the use of Uncanny Dodge as well. I’m aware that it becomes stronger once rogues reach 18th level and get the Elusive feature, so I’m not sure if that would unbalance this significantly; I’m assuming probably not?

Summon Shadow. At 17th level, you can summon a shadow, an undead shade. As an action, you summon a shadow, which uses the statistics of a wraith from the Monster Manual, but it’s alignment matches yours and it does not have the Create Spectre action. The shadow lasts until it is dropped to 0 hit points, at which point it disappears. If you summon another shadow whilst you already have a shadow summoned, the first one disappears. You can use this feature again once you finish a long rest.

I was a little unsure of what to do with this one. Summoning an ally (which can help you get sneak attack) seemed like a powerful ability, but merely summoning a CR 1/2 shadow seemed rather underwhelming for a 17th level ability, so I increased it to a CR 5 creature, a wraith. It might be that I’d be better off keeping it as a CR 1/2 shadow and swapping this feature with Hide in Plain Sight, since summoning a shadow might seem better off as a low level ability after all, and the Hide in Plain Sight can get away with being effectively at-will invisibility. However, this is the solution I’ve gone for.

Question

My question is simply: is this balanced compared to other roguish archetypes?

The above was designed with flavour in mind, which I’d rather keep as much as possible, but I have also considered the balance implications by taking other features from other classes where possible, and trying to place them at the levels where I believe they are the most balanced.

However, my commentaries above show that I have a couple of “backup plans”, such as changing my 3rd level features for Umbral Sight from the Gloom Stalker ranger as-is alongside Shadow Illusion, or to make Summon Shadow a 3rd level ability and Hide in Plain Sight a 17th level ability. If my above attempt has balance issues, hopefully one or more of these backup plans would resolve those issues?