Are the “Touched” feats’ spells ever subject to a spellcaster’s class rules (such as regarding preparation, components, and focuses)?

The Fey Touched and Shadow Touched feats published in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything each grant the use of two spells. Among other things, they say:

  1. You learn the [spells].
  2. You can cast each of these spells without expending a spell slot [once per long rest].
  3. You can also cast these spells using spell slots you have of the appropriate level.

The spellcasting ability for these spells is specific to the feat, so it may or may not be the same as the ability of the class that granted the spell slots.


My question applies to both feats and all spellcasting classes, but for the sake of clarity consider an artificer who has taken Fey Touched, which grants Misty Step. Artificers must add the M component to all spells they cast using the artificers’ spellcasting feature, but #2 above has nothing to do with their feature so shouldn’t require that. That’s good, because the reason the artificer can teleport is their prior exposure to the Fey, not some magical widget.

However, things get more complicated when they’re casting Misty Step as described in #3, because the artificer’s spell slots do come from their spellcasting feature. In that case, does the artificer simply use the spell slot as “fuel” and otherwise cast the spell exactly as it had been cast for #2? Or is this inherently different, for which we must assume the artificer studied the Misty Step effect and replicated it with a widget?

If the former, we can assume the spell never needs to be prepared; if the latter, it almost certainly does need to be prepared like all artificer spells.

Also, Misty Step is not on the Artificer Spell List, but the Invisibility spell granted by Shadow Touched is. Would that alter the answer in any way?


Potentially Related:

Does Magic Initiate allow the chosen spell to effectively be “always prepared” if the spell is on their spell list?

What makes a spell being cast considered to be a {class} spell?

If a spellcaster’s racial trait grants a spell that requires material components, can they use their class’ focus to cast that spell?

Can a kraken cast wizard spells which require verbal and somatic components?

The Kraken, according to the monster manual, can "Understand Abyssal, Celestial, Infernal, And Primordial But Can’t Speak, Telepathy 120 Ft." The Kraken also does not have hands. It seems as if the Kraken can barely cast any spells at all. Can these factors be somehow overcome or explained away, ideally whilst staying within the basic 5e rules?

Can objects created by Performance of Creation be used as expensive material components?

Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything introduces the College of Creation which gets the class feature Performance of Creation:

As an action, you can channel the magic of the Song of Creation to create one nonmagical item of your choice in an unoccupied space within 10 feet of you. The item must appear on a surface or in a liquid that can support it. The gp value of the item can’t be more than 20 times your bard level, and the item must be Medium or smaller.

…this isn’t a huge deal since there is a gold limit, so the cost of what you could reach is fairly small, but later on the College grants:

Creative Crescendo

[…]

You are no longer limited by gp value when creating items with Performance of Creation.

Could you create expensive nonmagical objects such as a diamond for resurrection magic, or the 500 gp statue for imprisonment? Would it work when casting these spells?

Does Concurrent Infusions allow you to skip the XP costs and material components of the infusions it applies?

Concurrent Infusions is a 4th level Artificer infusion that lets you apply the effects of three 1st level infusions, all at once, without actually ‘casting’ them.

You channel your artificer talents through an increased number of minor infusions. When you cast this infusion, you can imbue the target object with the effects of three different 1st-level infusions chosen at the time of casting. The infusions function exactly as if you had cast them on the object, and do not count against your daily allotment. (emphasis mine)

The argument I’ve seen is that this is insanely broken, as it lets you use 1st level infusions without paying the XP cost or material components (in particular, Spell Storing Item lets you cast any 4th level or lower spell in the game). However, the section I’ve bolded makes me wonder if that’s actually the case. Does it refer only to the effects of the infusions, or does it mean you also have to pay their costs "exactly as if you had cast them"? Is there any precedent one way or the other?

Do spells like burning hands specify specific non-material components?

In "Does Burning Hands really require touching thumbs?", it has been established that burning hands does indeed require touching thumbs. A question that is danced around there is, "is the touching thumbs the somatic component?" This question also extends to spells like dissonant whispers (verbal component) and message (verbal/somatic component). In other words, when a spell specifies something in its description, outside the component list, that could be nonetheless be construed as the component, is it in fact a component, or even the component?

I’m inclined to think such descriptions are the component, but am unsure. This does have some weird implications if so, like "how loud does one dissonantly whisper?" and "can someone else hear my whispered message?" (I don’t need these answered here; I just include them because they are related, depending on the answer.)

SEO – onload components seen as separate pages by Google

I have tried to optimized my blog by loading some component after the page load to improve the performance. Since I have done this, the performance has increased but I now see that those components have been indexed in Google search.

I have use the following code to load my components

window.onload = function (e)  {   loadComments();   loadFeeds(); } 

and then one of the functions:

function loadComments() {     event.preventDefault();     console.log('Loading comments');     fetch('https://www.laurentwillen.be/gadgets/xiaomi-mi-10-lite-5g-test-avis/?module=comments&r=".rand(0,1500); ?>',          {             method: 'GET',             headers : new Headers()         })     .then(response => response.text())     .then((response) =>          {             document.getElementById('comments-content').innerHTML=response;             // PREFEED COMMENT FORM             reply_links = document.querySelectorAll(".feed_form");             for (x=0;x<reply_links.length;x++)                 {                     local_reply = reply_links[x];                     local_reply.addEventListener("click", feedComment);                                      }          })     .catch((err)=>console.log(err))  } 

I can see that the url https://www.laurentwillen.be/gadgets/xiaomi-mi-10-lite-5g-test-avis/?module=comments is now indexed in Google and that’s not what I want.

Should I load the page differently? Or should I add something to the loaded component?

Thanks

Does casting a spell from an Ioun Stone/Ring of Spell Storing require components?

Items such as the Reserved Ioun Stone and Ring of Spell Storing state that:

The spell uses the slot level, spell save DC, spell attack bonus, and spellcasting ability of the original caster, but is otherwise treated as if you cast the spell.

There is no mention of not needing components, which suggests that components are needed twice for these items: once to cast the spell into it and again when casting a spell from them.

Is this correct?

Can the School of Conjuration wizard’s Minor Conjuration feature be used to summon rare, expensive, and/or consumable spell components?

Can the School of Conjuration wizard’s Minor Conjuration feature (PHB, p. 116) be used to summon rare, expensive, and/or consumable spell components?

It seems to fit within the scope of the feature in a rules-as-written manner, and I am inclined to allow it – but not having fully experienced the dynamics of higher level play where it might come more strongly into play, I have some uncertainty.

Can a creature under the effect of a Discord Symbol perform verbal spell components?

Symbol allows you to create a magical glyph that triggers on a condition you determine. One of the glyphs you can create is called Discord:

Each target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, a target bickers and argues with other creatures for 1 minute. During this time, it is incapable of meaningful communication and has disadvantage on attack rolls and ability checks.

Is a creature who fails the save against this effect capable of performing verbal spell components?

How to use the material components for Pass Without Trace

I am aware that many material components are either a joke (good or bad) or somehow related to how the spell works (IE: fleece for illusion is pulling the wool over someone). But for Pass Without Trace I cannot work out the connection to material components.

What is the link between the spell, and the ashes from a burned leaf of mistletoe and sprig of spruce used as the material components?

The only thing I can think of is that burning something creates smoke, which obfuscates vision, and spruce smells nice so covers scent. But I assume there is something I am missing as to why mistletoe and spruce rather than anything else smelly or burnt.

Note: I am not asking for designer reasons, but for links between the components and the spell.