What’s the meaning of “resources external to the SQL Server computer are needed” in Microsoft’s SQL documentation?

In Microsoft’s SQL Server documentation on Windows service account configuration, the decision to use either a VA (virtual account) or a MSA (managed service account) hinges on whether

resources external to the SQL Server computer are needed

What exactly does this phrase mean here? I’m seeking an explanation that makes sense to an ‘accidental DBA’ with minimal experience of SQL Server, or Windows Server, configuration. What counts as a ‘resource’ here, and what kinds of ‘need’ are relevant?

Context: I have a fresh SQL Server 2019 VM on Azure, which was configured with VAs out-of-the-box, and I’m trying to decide whether we need to switch to using MSAs. I have found multiple other questions concerning this same documentation page and/or the same basic decision between VAs or MSAs (or regular AD Accounts) – but none really explain this specific phrase in a way that helps me apply it to my particular scenario. Which is essentially a data warehouse use-case: data will be coming into this SQL instance from external sources, but that’ll be managed by a third-party DW automation application running SSIS scripts, not directly by the SQL engine. (This application has its own AD service accounts.)

Whilst I’ve explained my specific scenario here to try to clarify the question, I’m keen for a generic answer so anyone with any SQL Server use case can evaluate this "resources external to the SQL Server" phrase for their needs. Specific answers for my use case are also welcome.

USB flash drives sharing on computer network [closed]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_network

Can we share USB flash drives on a computer network?

Example : USB flash drives connected to a local Windows/Mac/Linux os machine is part of the computer network. The contents of the USB flash drives to be shared with other computers.

Can this be implemented?

How to turn lights on and off using a computer

I was watching a YouTube video on how computers were becoming a rage in the ’80’s in the first world countries. At 11:57, the user has programmed the computer to turn several appliances at his home on automatically in the middle of night. Similarly, at 13:58, the man uses voice commands to turn his lamp on and off. I want to know how (and if) I can achieve these tasks (especially the first one) using a modern day pc/laptop. I have seen several videos where people use Arduino or Raspberry Pis to achieve this. I want to know if I can bypass these devices.

Side Note: I am a beginner in programming but can write Python scripts to automate some of my stuff.

Remote debugging android app from another computer on different network

Is is it possible for Android development to remote debug an app from another network? I am not talking about WebView/Web Pages debugging but as stated here, as this page talks about remote debugging a WebView or web pages opened in any app and also I don’t think it will work on if device and computer are on different networks.

My scenario is that if Device A is connected to Computer A on Wifi A and I want to debug the app running on Device A from Computer B on Wifi B.

There is option to connect your device using the ADB wireless debugging using TCP-IP, but that requires the Device and Computer to be on the same network, but in my case device and computer are on another network.

How can we limit access to a single computer?

We would like to limit access to a web server (and eventually other services on the computer) to individuals that have been authorized access. Of course we don’t trust passwords so we think certificates are the right answer.

There are hundreds of these servers. Access to any one server should NOT provide access to any other server. The access should be to only the single server. (Access will also be time limited for additional security).

How can we implement these security requirements?

We are currently on a path that would involve creating individual CAs for each server. The server would require mutual authentication for the server and client. The server and client certs would be signed by the unique CA for each server.

Is there an alternative? Perhaps one that does not involve creating many CAs?

Thanks for you advice.

FYI — The servers are all running Linux.

Can a computer fan send you a code?

Normally, when I turn on my cpu the fan goes to high speed for a second and normalizes. Lately, when I start my CPU the fan seems to send me a code in pulses. Similar to how some devises send an error code through a flashing light, but in this case a flashing fan; can a cpu fan send a code and are used like this? If not intentional, what would cause the fan’s sofeware to be changed or signal to the fan interrupted?

The fan sounds normal and silent as always and cpu is normal too.