What is considered a successful death saving throw?

I’m fairly new to D&D and I wanted to run a session with some friends. I’ve been doing a lot of research but can’t seem to find an answer to this question. I understand how the mechanic works, three successes or rolling a 20 being stabilized and the opposite being death. However what I want to know is what would be considered a success? Is this up to the DM or is there a guide? I would assume anything above 10 would be a success and anything below would be a failure but I’d like clarity.

Can blank target and range spells be considered valid for the teamwork feat share spells?

In a past question I asked if there was a way to cast personal spells on other creatures, and a solution was given. It requires the teamwork feats bonded mind and shared spells, further enhanced by the spell Coordinated Effort.

So the hard part was finished or so I thought. I was expecting a plethora of wonderful buff spells that are mediocre or situational to a caster, but a wonderful boon to martial and others. Searching d20 with "Target You" and "Range personal". This was further complicated by the fact that not all spells have the right information. Take Bless and Detect Evil which both are missing range and target. Are these valid spells?

So the question is, spells whose description include you/the caster and without range/target allowed?

There is a similar question I asked but was specifically about the normal familiar share spells ability.

Are extra effects considered weapon damage on a sword of sharpness?

The Sword of Sharpness says:

When you attack an object with this magic sword and hit, maximize your weapon damage dice against the target.

Do some other effects (language use is intentional) add on to this, or is it only the weapon’s damage based on the weapon chart in the Player’s Handbook?

Examples:

  • Are the rogue’s Sneak Attack damage dice maximized?
  • Is the Bugbear’s extra damage die from its Brute trait maximized?
  • If I customize the sword to do extra cold or fire damage (based on a die roll), are those damage dice maximized?

Is an arrow (bolt, bullet) considered a weapon if used as intended?

As stated in the title: is an arrow, bolt, or other object that is generally used as ammunition, count as a weapon when determining bonus effects from other feats/abilities? For example:

Dreadful Strikes – 1d4 psychic damage – TCoE, pg. 58

When you hit a creature with a weapon, you can deal an extra 1d4 psychic damage to the target, which can take this extra damage only once per turn.

It seems clear that hitting a creature with a sword via melee, or even a thrown weapon, like a dart or dagger, would benefit from this feature. But since Arrows and Bolts are “considered” ammunition, they would not (unless used in some other improvised way).

If I hide some scripts from Google bot, will it be considered as cloaking?

I have a website built with Gatsby.js. After building it, I receive a lot of static HTML files, with React app bound to them. All content is in HTML already, JS is needed for some fancy transitions, forms and analytics. What I want to do, is loading only some (or maybe even none) of the scripts when Google bot requests the page.

As I read here, you are fine as long as you’re producing similar content for Google bot and for real users (and HTML content is exactly the same for both in my case).

But it is also said (sorry, cannot find the link where I saw this) that your tactic may be considered shady if you have any sort of conditions like if (userAgent === "googlebot") then ... else ... in your code (and this is actually my intent).

So my question is, will Google ban me for this or not?

Is the Adult Gold Dragon’s Weakening Breath considered a curse, disease, or poison?

In a fight with an Adult Gold Dragon today our delightful barbarian suffered from the effect of Weakening Breath. Our transmutation wizard used his Transmuter’s Stone for Panacea to restore hit points, and cure poison, disease, and curses. Would this cure the effect of Weakened Breath?

Are common potions of healing considered magic items?

I just had a session and there was an argument about this. In the DMG page 187-188 it shows potions of healing in the magic item section. In the PHB page 153 it says they are magical. On DNDBeyond it is considered both magical and mundane when you go to add equipment to your character. One player was saying they are always magic items and another was saying that according to dndbeyond it isn’t always a magic item. Which person is correct?