Essential Cosmetic Containers For Skincare & Beauty Packaging

Essential Cosmetic Containers For Skincare & Beauty Packaging

    Cosmetic containers expand to a range of jars, Cosmetic Bottles, pots, tubes, pens, compacts and liquid dispensing solutions. Each container offers a different design and solution; however, in the world of ‘cosmetic containers’, each product sits under the skincare, hair and beauty categories. This article will explore the different types of cosmetic containers available in the packaging industry. Raepak offers an extensive range of distinctive packaging products that enable us to explore innovations and keep an eye on exciting designs that are beneficial to the current market cycle.

    Cosmetic Jar Containers

    Cosmetic containers in the form of jars are perfect for skincare and beauty products. Cosmetic Jars can contain gels, creams, lotions and deep skin cleansing products. Most jar containers come with a shive (a flat plastic shelf that fits inside the jar) used to keep the contents free from foreign debris (dust & germs). Moreover, jars are designed with airtight lids, which keep the contents fresh and ready for future use.

    Raepak use a range of materials in the range of jars available;

            PP Jars – Recyclable – Soft or hard plastic effect
       
            PET Jars – Recyclable – Glass, hard or soft plastic finish
       
            SANS Jars – Non-Recyclable – Glass, hard effect plastic
       
            ACRYLIC Jars – Non-Recyclable – used for luxury brands and high-profile cosmetics.
       
    Cosmetic Bottle Containers

    Cosmetic Glass Bottle containers can be produced as airless recyclable containers or a high-end luxury acrylic bottles. Acrylic bottles look fantastic with a matching jar and can store nourishing body lotions or face creams. PP airless bottles can also store creams and lotions. However, they are cheaper to produce and lighter in raw plastic material. Cosmetic Plastic Bottles are seen as a hybrid between both full acrylic and pp airless containers.

            PP Airless Bottles – Recyclable – All products
       
            ACRYLIC Bottles – Non-Recyclable – Luxury products
       
            AIRLESS Acrylic Bottles – Non-Recyclable – Luxury products.
       
    Tube Containers

    Cosmetic Tube packaging containers come in different shapes, colors, materials and profiles. Cosmetic tubes are manufactured from high-quality materials, including AS, ABS, PETG, and PCTG. Each item is designed to work with makeup for the beauty & cosmetics industry. Furthermore, cosmetic containers are manufactured to have an excellent quality finish and be competitively priced.

    Currently, there is clamor worldwide to use Green Containers packaging in the cosmetics industry, largely driven by consumer and e-commerce trends.

    What Is Sustainable Cosmetic Packaging?

    Eco Friendly Bottles cosmetic packaging consists of beauty product packaging material that later on gets processed according to the 3Rs—reduce, reuse and recycle. Other important characteristics are biodegradability and being organic.

    Refillable also comes to mind because reuse can mean something else, like “repurposing.” The bottom line, the goal for substituting these materials is to lessen the volume of single-use packaging in the industry.

    The longevity, efficacy, and ease of use of skincare largely depend on what it sits in. To ensure optimal utilization of products, a genius form of packaging has begun to penetrate the market.

    We are talking about airless pump bottles — they are the real game changer! Read on to find out what these are, how to use one, and why we use them at Yours. Unlike the usual dispensers that make use of tubes or straws to Pumps products out, an airless pump bottle works with a vacuum mechanism.

Material Handling Equipment: Why Steel Containers

As you can imagine, there are several ways to move, stack, carry, store and prep material when deciding upon the correct material handling equipment. This may seem a bit more simplistic than it is but, in general, it takes a lot of consideration when creating the specific product material flow. Additionally, there are a lot of choices when it comes to the equipment used to move material, store it and potentially assemble it.
Material handling equipment can be any apparatus that helps move, store, protect and even control material. The options seem limitless.
Categories of Material Handling Equipment
There are four generalized categories of material handling equipment. The first is wire container. Generally, it consists of the JP wire containers and EU mesh containers.
The next category of material handling equipment is any roll container. 
The third category of material handling equipment consists of pallet containers. 
The last material handling equipment category refers to storage racking systems.
Determining the Right Container for Material Handling
When companies purchase containers for material handling, they tend to shop based on container type, size and availability. The size of the container depends on required holding capacity and the footprint of shop storage space. This is generally the starting point for many purchasing departments who receive specifications from their shop personnel for container use.

Pallet racks have played an essential role in maximizing storage capacity at warehouses and distribution centers for decades. An important part of industrial pallet racking design is the selection of rack decking, which acts as a base for storing cases or non-palletized items in conjunction with palletized products. By increasing the number of contact points between the product being stored and the storage media, decking reduces the chance of products falling – increasing overall warehouse safety. Naturally, not all decking solutions are created equal. One of the most versatile and popular choices, and the topic of this article, is wire decking.
If you’ve decided wire decking is the best option for your warehouse or distribution center, you still need to decide which options will work best. Below are 4 things to consider when selecting the best wire decking for your application.
1. What are you storing?
The most important factors when selecting wire decking are the weights and overall dimensions of the products that will be stored on it. Unless specifically designed to do so, wire decking is not intended to support the full weight of a pallet (point load) and can warp or collapse under the pressure. This creates a significant safety risk and is one of the most common mistakes we see in the field.
2. How will you be using your wire decking?
Will you be storing full pallets, individual pieces of equipment, or loose cases? Pallet racking can accommodate all the above, but it is important you consider the overall use of decking in your design. One very common use of wire decking is the storage of individual cases. Some companies refer to this as “hand stack”. If this is your intended use, you should consider increasing the density of the wire mesh grid. Standard grid densities are typically 2”x4”, 2.4”x4” or 2.5”x4.5”. When “hand stacking,” consider selecting a grid size of 1”x2” or 1”x4”. There are also design enhancements that can be incorporated into wire decking to help with your specific application. For example, the 90-degree turn at the front and rear edges of the wire deck, called waterfalls, can be configured upwards to help prevent products from sliding off the deck. There are also different accessories like dividers that clip onto the wire deck itself to help with organization. If your intended use is order picking, you could also consider sloping the wire decking to make it easier to access products.
3. In what type of storage media will the wire decking be going?
Are these wire decks for bulk shelving or pallet box? If the answer is pallet racking, is it roll-formed or structural? Manufacturers can differ slightly on the overall dimensions of their beams (horizontal members) and uprights (vertical members), so it’s important to check the sizing to ensure a good fit. Bastian Solutions has many years of experience working with all pallet racking manufacturers and can help in this selection process.
4. In what environment will the wire decking be going?
Is the wire decking going into a freezer or cooler? Will it be stored outside or in a facility where food is present? In most applications, a standard paint finish of backed on or powder coated enamel is fine. However, in environments where moisture or oxidation are concerns, galvanized or stainless steel should be considered.
Another consideration is whether wire deck channels should be inverted or flipped upside down. By inverting the wire decking channel, you can help mitigate the buildup of moisture, dust, dirt and other debris. This practice is commonly found in the food storage industry to promote a cleaner environment.

Should I write custom allocators for STL containers to interface with my memory pool, or just overwrite the standard new and delete

I want to write a custom memory allocator for learning. I’m tempted to have a master allocator that requests n bytes of ram from the heap (via new). This would be followed by several allocator… Adaptors? Each would interface with the master, requesting a block of memory to manage, these would be stack, linear, pool, slab allocators etc.

The problem I have is whether I should write custom allocator_traits to interface with these for the various STL containers; or if I should just ignore the adaptor idea and simply overload new and delete to use a custom pool allocator.

What I’m interested in understanding is what tangible benefit I would gain from having separate allocators for STL containers? It seems like the default std::allocator calls new and delete as needed so if I overload those to instead request from my big custom memory pool, I’d get all the benefit without the kruft of custom std::allocator code.

Or is this a matter where certain types of allocator models, like using a stack allocator for a std::dqueue would work better than the default allocator? And if so, wouldn’t the normal stl implementation already specialise?

gitlab ci (self hosted), docker, access to other containers

Even if i’m not allowed to access a specific repo (or if i have low perms (cant see ci/cd vars)) i still can create one and do something like:

variables:   USER: gitlab build:   stage: build   image: docker:latest   script:     - docker ps -a     - docker images 

Then when i have what i need, i can:

variables:   USER: gitlab build:   stage: build   image: docker:latest     - docker exec <container> /bin/cat /var/www/html/config.php     - docker exec <container> /usr/bin/env 

How to avoid this kind of stuff?

PS: This is on a self hosted gitlab server.

PS2: Originaly post on stackoverflow, but im asking here since i didnt have any answer.

What is the difference between the certificate containers in Windows?

I’ve always wondered. When you import a PKI certificate on a Windows system, you have several choices of where to store it:

  • Personal
  • Trusted Root Certification Authorities
  • Enterprise Trust
  • Intermediate Certification Authorities
  • Trusted Publishers
  • Third Party Root Certification Authorities
  • Etc.

All of these stores are duplicated between the user account and the machine account, and I understand the difference between those.

In practice, however, it does not seem to matter which location I choose; Certs get trusted by applications regardless of where I put them.

Is there any functional difference between them? Why do we need so many?

How do I share secret key files with Docker containers following 12 Factor App?

I am building an API and trying to follow the 12 Factor App methodology. Using Docker, the methodology says containers must be disposable.

Assuming the API will have high traffic, multiple docker containers will be running with the same app, connecting to the same database.

Certain fields in the database are encrypted and stored with a reference to the file containing the passphrase. – This is done so the passphrase can be updated, and old data can still be decrypted.

With a Docker container and following 12 Factor App, how should I provide the key files to each of the containers?

Am I correct in assuming I would need a separate server to handle the creating of new key files and distributing them over the network?

Is there secure software, protocols or services that do this already, or would I need a custom solution?

start proxy server on docker containers for http request from host

I have a docker container connected to a VPN, but sometimes i need to open a URL on browser for debug.

I cannot run the VPN on my host machine for security reasons, specifically i want to open the URL in my host machine and intercept request with BURP Suite, i already tried some “python proxy servers” from github to start a proxy on my docker machine and connect my host to it, without success.

Someone did something similar?. any ideas?

PD. sorry for my english. 🙂

I’m seeing strange names in my list of docker containers, is someone having fun at docker or is that from hackers?

I’m trying to run a docker and it fails for various reasons. As I check my list of dockers (docker ps -a), I see those names:

pedantic_gauss recursing_feynman adoring_brattain suspicious_tesla gallant_gates competent_gates elated_davinci ecstatic_mahavira focused_mirzakhani 

I use docker-compose and I’m sure we do not have such names in our setup files. Is that just something docker people thought would be fun to do?! I searched on some of those names and could not really find anything useful, although it looks like these appear on many sites, somewhat sporadically.

Openstack Novalx does not complete nested containers

We have (almost) deployed Openstack NovaLXD with conjure-up on a single machine. In this setup, conjure-up uses juju and lxd, and creates nested lxc containers. All of them comes up with IP addresses, but all the nested containers fails to complete the setup.

I can attach to the nested containers, and from there I can ping the IP of juju and also the internet.

How do I troubleshoot further ?