If a creature is dropped on a monster, how much damage does each of them take?

If a character who was under the effect of a growth potion (double their height and eight times their weight) and weighed 2,400 lbs. was able to use Dimension Door to teleport 400 feet or more into the air, directly above a Huge-sized monster, and fell on it, how much damage would the falling creature – and the monster – take?

I would assume both would take the 20d6 max for the falling over 200 feet, but is there a estimation on additional damage for the falling creature’s size?

According to the splat calculator, at 500 feet you’d be falling at 196 km/hr, and it would expend 1.6 million joules of energy, the equivalent of over 3,000 mid-sized cars hitting an object at 60 km/hr.

A 2,400-lb. barbarian falling 500 feet is like dropping a mid-sized Toyota Corolla off a 50 story building onto a monster – it should do some damage.

if you use Enhance Ability: Cat’s Grace on a creature that rolls initiative, does that creature lose the better roll when the spell ends?

Let’s say the caster uses Enhance Ability and chooses Cat’s Grace on themselves and rolls a 13 and a 16 with advantage on initiative, so they take 16. If the caster then loses Enhance Ability in-combat, or ends concentration on that spell, does their initiative roll revert to 13?

What happens when you have a creature grappled and use the Bait and Switch to move 5 feet away from the creature?

Does it just break your grapple since the creature is outside your reach? Does this count as "Moving a Grappled Target" and the creature you’re grappling moves 5 feet with you?

Or does this count as the latter, but since your speed is halved, and the maneuver only allows you to move 5 feet, your speed is 2.5 feet, and if playing on a grid, actually cannot move?

Must a creature with less than 30 feet of movement dash when effected by Symbol’s Fear effect?

The effect states:

Fear: Each target must make a Wisdom saving throw and becomes Frightened for 1 minute on a failed save. While Frightened, the target drops whatever it is holding and must move at least 30 feet away from the glyph on each of its turns, if able.

The "if able" is where I’m getting hung up. Yes, the creature is able to move 30 feet by dashing, however I’m not sure if that is intended, as it would severely limit certain PCs. If a creature only has 25 feet of movement, such as a gnome or halfling, are they forced to use there dash every turn to make that 30 feet minimum?
This was ruled in my game as no, since it meant 3 members of the party were still functional while the fourth would have been completely useless with having to dash every turn.

Is an unsuccessful attack on a creature under the effect of Charm Person “harmful” for purposes of ending the spell?

Consider the following elaborate scenario, which nevertheless actually occurred at our table.

Two PCs, Sophie Sorcerer and Roger Rogue, sneak into the hideout of hapless villain Tarley Target. While hidden, Sophie uses her Subtle Casting metamagic to silently cast sleep, rendering Tarley unconscious without ever alerting him to the intrusion. Sophie and Roger swiftly exfiltrate the sleeping Tarley from the hideout to their camp nearby, where Sophie successfully casts charm person on him. When the sleep spell ends and Tarley awakes, Sophie takes advantage of Tarley’s charmed condition: she dupes him into believing that someone else actually assaulted him, and that the PCs are in fact his saviors. Tarley, overcome with gratitude and having little cause to believe the PCs are really hostile, proceeds to spill his secrets. Once satisfied that she has squeezed every bit of useful information from Tarley, Sophie signals to Roger — who has been quietly, nonchalantly moving into striking position — to kill him. Initiative is rolled. Tarley is ruled surprised. Roger goes first, attacks, and misses.

Does Tarley’s charmed condition end?

The description of charm person says a target that fails its save "is charmed by you until the spell ends or until you or your companions do anything harmful to it." Does an unsuccessful attack count as "harmful" for purposes of charm person? Would it make a difference if Tarley remained unaware of the attack — e.g., because (as happened here) the DM ruled him distracted by Sophie’s riveting conversation?

Related questions:

  • This question asked what "harmful" means vis-à-vis charm person, but only in the context that the charmed condition restricts the charmed creature’s ability to "target the charmer with harmful abilities or magical effects."
  • This question asked whether the target of charm person has to know who damaged them in order for the spell to end, but that presumes damage was actually dealt.

What minimal space can a creature go through when squeezing?

A creature "squeezes" when going through a smaller space. PHB p. 193 "Creature size":

A creature can squeeze through a space that is large enough for a creature one size smaller than it.

Presumably, that means a creature can go through a space small enough for it to squeeze in, but not smaller. But how small this space can be? "A space that is large enough for a creature one size smaller" is unclear. How large is "large enough"? The same chapter says

A creature’s space is <…> not an expression of its physical dimensions. A typical Medium creature isn’t 5 feet wide, for example.

So if not 5 feet wide, how small that space can be? The answer to Can Medium creatures squeeze into smaller spaces? partially answers this by saying

While the small creature would be able to do it easily, the medium creature would need to squeeze.

But this is basically redefining what "squeezing" means for Medium creature through what it does for Small ones.

Can Favored Foe from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything target more than one creature at the same time?

The new Ranger ability, Favored Foe, says:

When you hit a creature with an attack roll, you can call on your mystical bond with nature to mark the target as your favored enemy for 1 minute or until you lose your concentration (as if you were concentrating on a spell).

The first time on each of your turns that you hit the favored enemy and deal damage to it, including when you mark it, you can increase that damage by 1d4.

You can use this feature to mark a favored enemy a number of times equal to your proficiency bonus, and you regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

Since the ability says that you mark the creature when you hit it and that you can use this feature a number of times equal to your proficiency modifier. I am wondering if you could target two creatures in the same turn, since you have Extra Attack at 5th level, to maximize the damage you can deal in a turn.

The scenario I imagine is the following, you attack creature A and mark it, then with your extra attack you attack creature B and mark it. On your next turn, you again attack creature A & B so you can use the "The first time on each of your turns that you hit the favoured enemy" clause of Favoured Foe ability to deal the extra damage since both creatures got hit only once on its turn.

Would this work?

What happens if a Sibriex targets the same creature with Warp Creature repeatedly?

The Sibriex monster, found in page 137 of Mordekainen’s Tome of Foes has an ability called "Warp Creature". For convenience, here’s the entire text of it: (emphasis mine)

The sibriex targets up to three creatures it can see within 120 feet of it. Each target must make a DC 20 Constitution saving throw. On a successful save, a creature becomes immune to this sibriex’s Warp Creature. On a failed save, the target is poisoned, which causes it to also gain 1 level of exhaustion. While poisoned in this way, the target must repeat the saving throw at the start of each of its turns. Three successful saves against the poison end it , and ending the poison removes any levels of exhaustion caused by it. Each failed save causes the target to suffer another level of exhaustion. Once the target reaches 6 levels of exhaustion, it dies and instantly transforms into a living abyssal wretch under the sibriex’s control. The transformation of the body can be undone only by a wish spell.

I’m aware that normally a creature can’t be "double-poisoned". If it is poisoned and gets hit with the condition again, the duration is simply reset. However, Exhaustion is a special condition in that it comes with 6 levels of severity.

I’m at loss as of how to interpret the wording of the Sibriex ability. If it has hit a creature with Warp Flesh, can it speed up the death process by using the ability again? Or can it only wait for six failed saves and hope the creature does not rid itself of the effect?

  • Does the sentence "Each failed save causes the target to suffer another level of exhaustion" apply only to end-of-turn saves or to saves caused directly by the sibriex using the ability again too?
  • If not, is there any benefit for it to try Warping the same creature twice?

Can a feebleminded creature use spell-like abilities?

Can a creature that’s affected by feeblemind continue using its spell-like abilities?

Feeblemind doesn’t explicitly rule out using spell-like abilities, but normally only creatures that have some intelligence/charisma have spell-like abilities so maybe feeblemind does prevent them? But then again no spell components are necessary for using the abilities.