How does moving a grappled creature work?

Only relevant rules as far as I can tell (pg. 195).

Moving a Grappled Creature. When you move, you can drag or carry the grappled creature with you, but your speed is halved, unless the creature is two or more sizes smaller than you.

So if you’re dragging the grappled creature, how/where do they move? Where is the the grapple-ee dragged to in relation to the grappler?

The most common ruling I’ve seen for this is that the grappler can rotate the grapple-ee as much as they want. Couldn’t this combo with spike growth for infinite damage?

Can I pluck a polymorphed creature and keep its feathers? [duplicate]

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  • What happens to a polymorphed character if he is shorn as a sheep? 1 answer

So this is a question about the polymorph and true polymorph spells. Both spells include in their description an explanation as to what happens to the gear of the target of the polymorph spells …

The target’s gear melds into the new form. The creature can’t activate, use, wield, or otherwise benefit from any of its equipment.

… but nothing about what happens if you take away a part of the creature, like a feather, does it disappear once the spell is over, do you keep it ?

This is probably a subjective matter who’s gonna gather subjective answers, but I don’t mind. I have found nothing in the SAC or the erratas about that and even tho my current GM has ruled that I could keep the feather of the hummingbird I had polymorphed into, but I also do feel like it’s a debate I could have with every future DM … might as well see what RPG Stack Exchange thinks ?

Does a creature polymorphed into a Giant Ape carry ammunition to make its ranged attacks?

The description of the polymorph spell (BR, p. 266) says:

The target’s game statistics, including mental ability scores, are replaced by the statistics of the chosen beast. It retains its alignment and personality.

The Ammunition section of the rules on monsters (MM, p. 12; BR, p. 114) says:

A monster carries enough ammunition to make its ranged attacks. You can assume that a monster has 2d4 pieces of ammunition for a thrown weapon attack, and 2d10 pieces of ammunition for a projectile weapon such as a bow or crossbow.

The Giant Ape statblock (MM, p. 323) includes the Rock attack:

Rock. Ranged Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, range 50/100 ft., one target. Hit: 30 (7d6 + 6) bludgeoning damage.

If a creature’s game statistics are replaced by the statistics of the chosen beast when polymorphed, does a character polymorphed into a Giant Ape carry rocks on him to make its rock attack once transformed?

Can a polymorphed creature understand langues spoken under the effect of Tongues?

Let’s say we have a spy that has been True Polymorphed into a sheep (to blend in, obviously). The spy originally knew Common + some other languages. As a sheep, though, she can only bleat.

True Polymorph includes in the description (emphasis mine):

The target’s game statistics, including mental ability scores, are replaced by the statistics of the new form. It retains its alignment and personality.

[…]

The creature is limited in the actions it can perform by the nature of its new form, and it can’t speak, cast spells, or take any other action that requires hands or speech, unless its new form is capable of such actions.

Let’s further say that the sheep is spying on some cultists at the local farm. One of the cultists is speaking a language that the spy did not originally know and has cast Tongues on himself to communicate with his bretheren.

Tongues says (emphasis mine):

This spell grants the creature you touch the ability to understand any spoken language it hears. Moreover, when the target speaks, any creature that knows at least one language and can hear the target understands what it says.

Assuming our woolly friend is close enough to hear, does she know what’s being said?

More specifically: Can a creature that knows a language, after having been polymorphed into a beast, understand or speak any language at all (Sheep, Cow, Pig, etc.), such that it could understand someone speaking under the effect of Tongues?

Avoiding the lance disadvantage when mounted on a large creature

This question begins the same as this question:

Is weapon reach measured from the edge of the mount's space or the rider's?

However the accepted answer seems to contradict the other two highly-voted answers. Plus, the highly-voted ones seem to suggest that it is kind of up to the player, or at least in favour of the player.

My question is then about how this all applies to a character wielding a lance while riding a large creature.

If the mount is right up against the enemy, can the character on the mount attack with the lance without disadvantage, because they are in fact not within 5 feet?

What is a willing creature? [duplicate]

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  • Save against a spell thought to be harmless 5 answers

What is a willing creature?

Most spells tend to have saving throws, even the cure spells. I know the saving throw is there because they can harm those who have negative energy instead. Generally when a source is a known and trusted person, say the party cleric, no saving throws are made. Yet, I cant find a rule which allows this. Spell resistance for example always applies unless they take an action to lower it.

The reason why I am asking this is because of that trust factor. I am in an evil game, eventually I plan on posing as a good cleric and helping people. After I have done this for awhile I expect to start using harmful spells, possibly even baleful polymorph. As I have worked to build up the reputation, and they have been accepting spells from me, provided there is no reason to suddenly distrust me, would they be affected by the spell(s) with no saves or not?

There are some other questions which are along the same lines, but are different. Im not asking about mindless creatures and being willing. This one is from 5th but is much more along my lines.

There is also the possibility that I will be pretending to be known people, using claim identity, so as long as they fail to see past it, would they be willing.

Does flanking a creature make it a surprise attack, meeting the requirement for the Assassin rogue’s Assassinate feature?

The optional rule on flanking (DMG, p. 251) says:

Flanking on Squares. When a creature and at least one of its allies are adjacent to an enemy and on opposite sides or corners of the enemy’s space, they flank that enemy, and each of them has advantage on melee attack rolls against that enemy.

When in doubt about whether two creatures flank an enemy on a grid, trace an imaginary line between the centers of the creatures’ spaces. If the line passes through opposite sides or corners of the enemy’s space, the enemy is flanked.

Flanking on Hexes. When a creature and at least one of its allies are adjacent to an enemy and on opposite sides of the enemy’s space, they flank that enemy, and each of them has advantage on attack rolls against that enemy. On hexes, count around the enemy from one creature to its ally. Against a Medium or smaller creature, the allies flank if there are 2 hexes between them. Against a Large creature, the allies flank if there are 4 hexes between them. Against a Huge creature, they must have 5 hexes between them. Against a Gargantuan creature, they must have at least 6 hexes between them.

The description of the Assassin rogue’s Assassinate feature (PHB, p. 97) says:

Starting at 3rd level, you are at your deadliest when you get the drop on your enemies. You have advantage on attack rolls against any creature that hasn’t taken a turn in the combat yet. In addition, any hit you score against a creature that is surprised is a critical hit.

If I’m flanking a creature, is my attack considered a surprise attack?

Had a debate yesterday on whether or not Assassinate can be used every round or only in the first round of combat ‘Surprise’. We decided or the latter. Is this correct?