Is a natural 20 always a critical hit?

Critical Hits agree:

When you make an attack and succeed with a natural 20 (the number on the die is 20), or if the result of your attack exceeds the target’s AC by 10, you achieve a critical success (also known as a critical hit).

Determine the Degree of Success disagrees:

If you rolled a 20 on the die (a “natural 20”), your result is one degree of success better than it would be by numbers alone. This means that a natural 20 usually results in a critical success and natural 1 usually results in a critical failure. However, if you were going up against a very high DC, you might get only a success with a natural 20, or even a failure if 20 plus your total modifier is 10 or more below the DC.

So if I roll a 20 on my third attack, but it is stil lower than the enemy AC (because of MAP for example), is it a critical hit, or a normal hit?

Are there any creatures that are immune to critical hits?

My thinking behind this is to do with the property of Adamantine Armour which states that "While you’re wearing it, any critical hit against you becomes a normal hit" (DMG, p.150).

I wondered if there are any creatures in the officially published materials that have this feature "naturally"? – possibly as a result of their skin/scales being so hard or because of another innate feature.

I am looking for answers with reference to creatures from 5e or previous editions.

Calculating the critical hits damage [duplicate]

I’m the new person in the D&D and I’ve got a polish version od Player’s Handbook. I’ve got some weird feeling that I do not understand well the Critical Hits mechanics or that paragraph is written in a weird style. Also, Mathew Mercer is saying something strange in one of his video.

One of my players is a 4 level Half-Orc Barbarian, and he uses a great axe (d12). He got funny passive from being the Half-Orc that makes him got one more dice on Critical Hits.

And there we got some problem.

If he rolls natural 20 on the attack test:

A) He has to roll 3d12 and add his strength? I mean that he has the first dice from a great axe, the second from the half-orc passive and the third from the natural 20?

B) He has to roll 4d12 then add his strength? I mean that he has the first dice from a great axe, the second from being half-orc and he has to double it cause he doubles all dices?

C) He has to roll 2d12, double that and add his strength? I mean that he has the first dice from a great axe, the second from the half-orc passive and doubling the damage not the dices? I have this idea cause Matthew is saying in one of his videos: "Critical means the damage dice you double. Roll for damage, double that, and add your modifier."

I know guys, that is a kinda stupid question but I’m starting being GM and after a couple of hours of doing the option "A", I’ve got some feeling that Critical Hits doesn’t matter.

How exactly Power Attack and critical hit works together?

I tried to follow the rules and check FAQs but now I need a help:

I got a 13° liv THF (two-hand fighter) and 6° liv Aegis (BAB=19) and 5° Mithic tier, with Power Attack and Mithic Power Attack (but not obviously Greater Power Attack) and 34 Strenght+Brawn (+12 mod), here are damage stats as I supposed:

    12x1.5= 18(THW)      +3(Weapon Training)      +6(Weapon Specialization+2, Greater+2, Mithic+2)      +4(Magic Weapon mod)      +3(Improved Damage from Astral skin customization)      +1(Psionic Damage from Astral skin customization)      +1(Psionic Weapon feat) and      +24(Power Attack,Mithic) = 60 for first attack and 66 for iterative (due to Backswing) 

Now the question is: Whats happens with a critical hit on each point? – I’ve found many question and I read not enough answers about it so I fall in chaos each critical hit (no more a great pleasure but a trouble)-.

and then another question regarding Power Attack and Critical hit is:

Whats happens at 15° liv (for THF archetype) and Power Attack change to Power Attack, Greater ?

Thanks

When extra damage dice are listed in a critical effect, do they apply to crit-immune targets?

In the immunity rules, we read:

Immunity to critical hits works a little differently. When a creature immune to critical hits is critically hit by a Strike or other attack that deals damage, it takes normal damage instead of double damage. This does not make it immune to any other critical success effects of other actions that have the attack trait (such as Grapple and Shove).

My interpretation of this rule is that the normal doubling of damage does not occur, but any other listed affects of a critical success do occur. I believe this is the accepted interpretation of the rule, as well.

Now, about the spell Hydraulic Push. This spell reads a bit unusual, because it normally does 3d6 damage (and 5 feet of knockback), but has a listed critical effect that instead does 6d6 damage (and 10 feet of knockback). This is notably different from the standard/basic critical effect of rolling normal damage and then doubling it.

When Hydraulic Push crits against a crit-immune creature, how much damage does it do? And more generally, are extra damage dice listed under a critical effect applied to crit-immune targets?

Are oozes immune to critical failures?

In a previous session, one of my players used Sudden Bolt against a Living Sap. Living Sap’s have immunity to critical hits. They rolled low on their Reflex Save, and got 11 less than the spellcaster’s DC. I ruled critical failure and gave Sudden Bolt double damage. One of my players had assumed that their immunity to critical hits would make them immune to critical failures (they didn’t fight too hard since it was a fairly beneficial ruling 🙂 ). Was I right to rule that way? (I’ve included my reasoning as an answer on the off chance that I’m right).

Do you double the delayed damage for Melf’s Acid Arrow after a critical hit?

The spell Melf’s Acid Arrow does 4d4 on hit and 2d4 next turn (I’m ignoring what happens for a miss). If you roll a 20 for your spell attack roll, you double the 4d4 to 8d4.

What about the 2d4 next turn? Does that get doubled too or does that just stay at 2d4 because it occurs on the next turn?

I know that How does extra damage work for critical hits? covers additional kinds of damage during a critical hit, but this is the same substance that did critical damage, continuing its damage in a later round.

What’s the highest critical hit damage a level 1 character can do?

What’s the highest critical hit damage a level 1 character can do?

Rules:

  • The character must be level 1
  • The character cannot have any magical items
  • The character’s starting equipment must be affordable with the standard 15 gp start
  • The character can be assisted by up to three other level 1 characters with the same restrictions
  • The three assistant characters each have one round before the primary character makes their attack
  • The damage must come off of one critical hit (i.e. the first hit of Flurry of Blows, not both)
  • Max damage can be assumed

Interaction between Bane and critical hits

The first level spell Bane allows you to curse a creature so that each saving throw or attack roll is reduced by 1d4 for the duration:

Whenever a target [..] makes an attack roll or saving throw before the spell ends, the target must roll a d4 and subtract the number rolled from the attack roll or saving throw. (PHB 216)

How does this interact with an attack roll of natural 20?

I can see two possible interpretations:

  • Bane is stronger: A target under the effect of bane cannot make critical attacks, because 20 – 1d4 will always be < 20.

  • Critical is stronger: A target under the effect of bane can make crits, since crits occur on a natural 20, and the bane malus is applied after determining crit.

A good answer would include relevant rules text to show how this should be handled.

Does the “Rapier Training” Swashbuckler class feature count as having the Improved Critical feat?

I’m DMing for a group of five people. One player, Swashbuckler with the Inspired Blade archetype, wanted to select critical feats which have Improved Critical as a prerequisite. The following Inspired Blade feature describes it as follows:

Rapier Training (Ex): At 5th level, an inspired blade gains a +1 bonus on attack rolls and a +2 bonus on damage rolls with rapiers. While wielding a rapier, she gains the benefit of the Improved Critical feat. These attack and damage bonuses increase by 1 for every 4 levels beyond 5th (to a maximum of +4 on attack rolls and +5 on damage rolls at 17th level). This ability replaces swashbuckler weapon training.

It seems to me that the player cannot do it, but I’ve house ruled otherwise. The reason is because his character looks pretty bad in the game (I did not tell him this) and is already getting behind others on the table. Charmed Life with Opportune Parry and Riposte are letting his immediate actions overloaded whilst his char is too squishy due to spending ability points on Dex, Int and Cha. Taxing him another feat with improved critical seemed bad from a balancing perspective. There is a vanilla warrior on the group who does everything the swashbuckler does but significantly better.

That being said I’ve got two questions for you:

  1. Does the "Rapier Training" Swashbuckler class feature count as having the Improved Critical feat? (From the title)

  2. What would you have done in such situation?

Obs.: this class seems quite unbalanced and badly designed to me.

Thanks!