How does multiclassing affect the damage scaling of Hexblade’s curse? [duplicate]

So,I am playing a multiclass character with level 14 in fighter and level 1 in Warlock. Now Hexblade’s curse damage depends on player’s proficiency bonus.My level 15 character’s proficiency bonus is +5 but a level1 warlock’s proficiency bonus is +2. So, which proficiency bonus should I add as hexblade’s curse damage?

Is adjusting damage type an appropriate power level for bestow curse?

A rather creative cleric in my game’s party has presented with a new curse they want to use. The new curse is:

All damage the target creature takes is treated as the damage type to which the creature is most vulnerable

This curse basically removes any sort of damage reduction from the game, plus it can even make all damage the players do to monsters more powerful than intended. Our evoker, for instance, can memorize only powerful fire spells with confidence that those fire spells will have full effectiveness on creatures. The cleric is prepared to heighten spell to keep the saving throw as high as possible.

Is this curse:

  1. Appropriate for bestow curse
  2. Too strong for bestow curse but appropriate for bestow curse, greater
  3. Inappropriate for a permanent debuff

I don’t consider this a homebrew question since bestow curse explicitly encourages creation of new curses. I have just always had difficulty judging the power of curses

A PC in Curse of Strahd is cursed by Mother Night and eats a dream pastry. What happens?

A PC in Curse of Strahd has the opportunity to be cursed by Mother Night, at which point they are

On the other hand, a PC who eats a dream pastry

As luck would have it, one of the PCs in my current CoS campaign has been cursed, although he has not yet slept. He is also the only PC to have previously eaten a dream pastry. If he realizes the effects of the curse and decides to counteract it with a dream pastry, what would happen?

Can a focused practitioner throw a death curse?

Wizards are explicitly able to throw a death curse, in the events of their deaths in this setting. The "Your Story" also describes this "wizard ability".

However, if the players kill a powerful enough focused practitioner: is it possible that this practitioner could throw a curse at one of them as well, if they have the opportunity? Assuming that the focused practitioner has some sort of ritual ability focus, considering that a death curse is mechanically a ritual of sorts, as opposed to an evocation sorcerer.

Or is it wizard exclusive by the universe/rpg rules?

What I have found in the rulebook appears to suggest that, but I may have missed something.

What is the spell save DC for the spells gains via the dark gifts in Curse of Strahd?

In Curse of Strahd, in Amber Temple,

The descriptions of these dark gifts do not make any mention of a spell save DC, should the dark gift allow the casting of a spell. For a player who has a spellcasting class, I guess you can just use their class’s spell save DC (that’s what I ruled when this came up the other day, although if they had different spell save DCs if they were multiclassed, which one?), but for non-spellcasting classes, clearly they have no spell save DC from their class.

For some of these spells, clearly a spell save DC isn’t relevant, such as:

but for others, it is, such as:

but it doesn’t seem to mention anything about a spell save DC for these spells anywhere, either in each specific dark gift’s description nor in the general information about dark gifts in the sidebar on p. 191.

Am I missing something, or is there another way to determine what these spell save DCs should be?

Curse of Strahd – Does NPC ability trump Inspiration rule?

In Curse of Strahd, the players can encounter an NPC with a special ability.

Is the NPC’s use of this ability supposed to be an example of "specific beats general", where their ability as written within the context of the module overrides the PHB limitation that

You either have inspiration or you don’t—you can’t stockpile multiple “inspirations” for later use.

or

are we to understand that the ability comes with the implied clause, "subject to the normal rules of Inspiration" or "as long as that character is not currently Inspired".

Related: How is this character useful as an ally in Curse of Strahd?

How to permanently curse an item?

By permanently, I don’t mean ‘until dispelled’, which can be achieved by using upcast bestow curse . I want to make those items that cannot be unattuned, except by casting remove curse on the wielder. I want to make it unremovable by remove curse. In short, similar to your traditional cursed magic item.

Are there rule, guidance, or precedent to convince my DM?

Of course there are DM ruling, but it will be helpful if the process can be described mechanically or narratively.

Are these proposed effects of consecrated ground suitable for Curse of Strahd?

I believe that existing rules imply the existence of consecrated ground not created by the hallow spell (see Are there published effects of Consecrated (not Hallowed) Ground?)

I am currently running Curse of Strahd, and would like to have some of the churches be merely consecrated ground, and others be hallowed (which would be a stronger effect).

In particular,

Since there does not appear to be at present a rules description of the effects of consecrated (but not hallowed) ground, for the purposes of my game I would like to treat consecrated ground as

Undead standing on consecrated ground have disadvantage on all saving throws

(to mirror the effects of desecrated ground in the DMG) and

Undead standing on consecrated ground take d6 radiant damage at the start of their turn

(to mirror the DMG description of holy water purifying desecrated ground, to provide a cinematic effect of Strahd zombies bursting into flame as they attack a church, and to provide PC’s a safer zone where they may be attacked by vampires and vampire spawn but at least their foes can’t regenerate)

To balance this second effect I would add the following to the effects of desecrated ground as described in the DMG:

Celestials who use their Healing Touch while on desecrated ground have it count as two uses toward their daily limit.

Would providing these benefits to the consecrated ground at the various holy sites within Barovia disrupt any plot points or unbalance any encounters within Curse of Strahd?

Dismissal, Banishment, and Curse of Strahd

Background

In Curse of Strahd, the NPC

has the spell Dispel Evil and Good. It has the following feature, similar to the spell Banishment:

Dismissal. As your action, make a melee spell attack against…an undead you can reach. On a hit, you attempt to drive the creature back to its home plane. The creature must succeed on a Charisma saving throw or be sent back to its home plane (if it isn’t there already). If they aren’t on their home plane, undead are sent to the Shadowfell…

Note that as written, this implies that there exist undead that aren’t native to the Shadowfell, but that they go there (rather than their home plane) if they are not on their home plane when they are Dismissed. (Otherwise it would say, "If they aren’t already there, undead are sent to the Shadowfell")

However, note also that Barovia is part of the Domains of Dread, which are a demiplane within the Shadowfell.

As the NPC’s most powerful spell, it seems like this ought to be of some use to them (and other aspects of the spell do indeed make it useful). But the presence of Barovia within the Shadowfell may limit its effectiveness.

Questions

It is clear that for an undead native to Barovia, nothing would happen; the Dismissal would fail.

  1. For an undead not native to Barovia, would ‘sending it to the Shadowfell’ also result in failure, or could it be forced from the demiplane of Dread and deposited in the greater Shadowfell?

  2. What undead are not native to Barovia?

Zombies created by Strahd from Barovians seem likely to be natives of the demiplane itself.

Strahd himself was born on the Prime – but I would argue that his pact with the Dark Powers has made him a native of the Barovia. He is the Ancient, he is the Land.

There is a group of vampire spawn who are explicitly said to be former adventures Strahd lured to his realm and then made undead once they arrived. In this case, would Dismissal treat them as neither native to Barovia nor the Shadowfell? Is the home plane where the creature / soul is from, or where it became undead?

Related

What is the connection between the Shadowfell and Strahd/the plane of Barovia?

What does the Banishment spell do inside a Demiplane?

What determines a creature's native plane for the Banishment spell?

If I cast the Banishment spell on myself while in a demiplane, where exactly do I exit?

Can you cast banishment on yourself?

Can I permanently banish a devil from one layer of the Hells to another using the Banishment spell?