Is a target pushed into a wall by a spell effect subject to collision damage?

Some spells can push the target X feet away (like thunderwave, which pushes 10 feet away on a failed save). I was wondering what happens if the target, while being pushed, encounters a wall or other rigid object. Does it take (bludgeoning) damage? To me it seems logical that it would: it is like falling, sudden force applied to a creature due to encountering resistance from an object.

I couldn’t find any rules about this in the Player’s Handbook nor online.

Does Thunderwave normally deal falling damage? [duplicate]

Is normal that if a target is Thunderwave’d into a wall, then they take initial damage from the Spell, and then additional "falling damage" from being flung into the wall.

Similarly, if there’s an object (say, a cart) between the target at the caster, would it be normal for the target to get hit by the cart and be dealt additional damage as a result?

I can’t find anything in RAW that explicitly covers it either way, and obviously the DM can Rule Zero whatever they want. But would doing so be considered normal?

Does the Fire Elementa’s Touch attack’s ongoing damage stack with itself? [duplicate]

If a fire elemental uses the Touch attack:

Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (2d6 + 3) fire damage. If the target is a creature or a flammable object, it ignites. Until a creature takes an action to douse the fire, the target takes 5 (1d10) fire damage at the start of each of its turns.

And then hits a creature twice, how would the emphasized text work? Would the creature have two instances of it and take 2d10 damage at the start of the turn or only one? If they would have it twice would they be able to put both out by dousing the fire?

Do the Fire Elemental’s Fire Form trait’s and Touch attack’s ongoing fire damage stack with each other?

Inspired by the following:

  • Does the Fire Elementa's Touch attack's ongoing damage stack with itself?

I realized that my own answer to that question hinges on the idea of features having the same name, but the Fire Elemental actually has two different features that cause extremely similar effects.

Notably it has the Fire Form trait and the Touch attack which state:

[…] In addition, the elemental can enter a hostile creature’s space and stop there. The first time it enters a creature’s space on a turn, that creature takes 5 (1d10) fire damage and catches fire; until someone takes an action to douse the fire, the creature takes 5 (1d10) fire damage at the start of each of its turns.

[…] If the target is a creature or a flammable object, it ignites. Until a creature takes an action to douse the fire, the target takes 5 (1d10) fire damage at the start of each of its turns.

Do these two ongoing effects stack with each other?

Do I get to add my dexterity bonus to my damage rolls with Shadow Blade?

Tonight I brought out my shadow blade and my GM ruled that I didn’t get to add any extra damage to my shadow blade from my dexterity, because spells only do what they say they do, which is fine and I rolled with it.

My contention is that the spell says I should be able to add my dexterity to damage rolls since it is a finesse weapon. Was it the intent of this spell to deal 2d8 or 2d8+dex on a hit?

For those who want to know: my GM let me use my spell casting ability + PB for attack rolls.

Shadow Blade says:

You weave together threads of shadow to create a sword of solidified gloom in your hand. This magic sword lasts until the spell ends. It counts as a simple melee weapon with which you are proficient. It deals 2d8 psychic damage on a hit and has the finesse, light, and thrown properties (range 20/60).

Finesse says :

When making an attack with a finesse weapon, you use your choice of your Strength or Dexterity modifier for the attack and damage rolls. You must use the same modifier for both rolls.

Is the Hunter Ranger’s extra damage from Colossus Slayer optional?

Can I choose to not use the Ranger’s Colossus Slayer feature when I hit an injured target with a bow and arrow?

When my DM found out about Colossus Slayer, he started making all my 1s on attack rolls a guaranteed hit against someone in my party as long as they’re in my range. We’re level 3 at the moment, and essentially half- and one-shotting my teammates every time I roll a 1 feels pretty sucky.

Is there a difference between “damage taken” and “damage dealt”?

This question is prompted by parts of How much damage can the Guardian of Faith spell deal?, If someone casts Vampiric Touch on a creature with necrotic absorption, does the caster take damage?, and this answer.

I am hoping for a more conclusive understanding of whether, within the mechanics of 5e, there is a difference between damage taken by a creature and damage dealt to a creature.

Is there a difference between any of the following aside from phrasing:

  • Gaspar took 8 points of damage from Joan’s attack
  • Gaspar was dealt 8 points of damage by Joan
  • Joan’s attack against Gaspar dealt 8 points of damage

Or rather is there a difference between "A creature hit by your attack takes 1d8 points of damage" and "Your attack deals 1d8 damage to the creature it hits"?

Does Warding Bond carry over damage type?

The warding bond spell description states:

While the target is within 60 feet of you, it gains a +1 bonus to AC and saving throws, and it has resistance to all damage. Also, each time it takes damage, you take the same amount of damage.

If you cast the spell on another creature and then that creature is damaged, what type is the damage you take? If the target receives 12 slashing damage, do you get 6 slashing damage, or just 6 (untyped) damage?

How does a Battle Master’s Parry work with multiple damage types? [duplicate]

Suppose an attack does 5 piercing and 5 poison damage (or 5 slashing and 5 fire, etc.) and the player parries the attack, and rolls to reduce 6 points of damage. Which type of damage is reduced first? Would the answer be different if it were 9 weapon damage and 1 elemental, or vice versa?

Parry:

When another creature damages you with a melee attack, you can use your reaction and expend one superiority die to reduce the damage by the number you roll on your superiority die + your Dexterity modifier.

This matters if, for example, the character has resistance to one of the damage types.

The kindest interpretation (and one that does make some “sense”) would be that it reduces weapon damage first, and if it reduces the weapon damage to zero, none of the additional damage is done either, but that seems over powered. Unless someone can unambiguously point me to rules that support this interpretation, I prefer an interpretation where the total damage reduced is as rolled.

Aura of the Guardian and Damage order of operations

The Oath of Redemption Paladin subclass gets the following feature at 7th level (XGtE, 39):

you can shield your allies from harm at the cost of your own health. When a creature within 10 feet of you takes damage, you can use your reaction to magically take that damage, instead of that creature taking it. This feature doesn’t transfer any other effects that might accompany the damage, and this damage can’t be reduced in any way.

It is clear that the Paladin cannot reduce the damage they take but it is unclear whether the damage the the initial target would have taken could be reduced. Is the rule that the damage cannot be reduced from its original damage roll or that it cannot be reduced from what the target would have taken?

For example:

Farla the fighter has the feat Heavy Armor Master which grants:

While you are wearing heavy armor, bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage that you take from nonmagical weapons is reduced by 3.

Farla is under the effect of Warding Bond which grants her resistance to all damage.

Farla is hit by a Storm Giant’s greatsword which rolls 30 damage.

Heavy Armor Master reduces this to 27 which is then reduced to 13 by resistance. Unfortunately Farla only has 10 hp remaining so Psi the Paladin uses Aura of the Guardian to take the damage instead.

How much damage does Psi take?