GOOD REASONS FOR A HEIGHT-ADJUSTABLE DESK

Standing while working, even for just 30 minutes at a time (4 hours a day or more) can have a major impact on your health and body, and it’s not difficult to do if you have the right equipment. Sit-Stand desks, sometimes known as standing desks or height-adjustable desks, are all the rage and make it very easy to change posture throughout the day while working. For example, this one offers easy adjustability of the desktop height and has a swiveling chair that can move out of the way while standing! 
Height adjustable desks are becoming increasingly popular in the office. And rightly so: height-adjustable desks allow for an uncomplicated change of working posture, from sitting to standing and back again. The investment in height-adjustable desks pays off as it can avoid preventable back complaints, increases performance, concentration and motivation of employees, and minimizes downtime. The smow furnishing experts have assembled essentials to consider when selecting in a sit-stand desk, and why they are so enormously advantageous for employees and employers.
By nature, the human body functions best when it moves; however, especially in everyday office life, stationary sitting is the predominant position and this all too often leads to stiffening or joint wear and tear. It has long been established that well-adapted, ergonomic office chairs are essential in everyday office life; however, it is also important to regularly stand up in the course of the working day, including for prolonged periods. This does not mean that you should only stand, not only is that not necessarily healthy, but moreover it is not always possible. Much more, frequent changes of position is recommended, changes from which the body and brain profit. The occasional change of position and posture is essential for a lively mind. Some experts recommend sitting for 60 % of the working time, 30 % standing and actively moving during the remaining 10 % of the working day. Regardless of your preferred option it is clear that a healthy combination of sitting, standing and active moving should be encouraged and undertaken.

Standing desk frames have an extremely positive effect on workplace ergonomics – and that without the need for major alterations. Following a quick transition period, you and your employees will realise the many advantages a electric height adjustable desk can bring in so many areas. 
If a desk cannot be height-adjusted, and the work process is extremely monotonous, a number of problems can arise:

  • Dissatisfaction and irritability
  • Tensions and chronic bad posture
  • Declining quality of work and concentration → inefficiency
  • Motivation problems due to monotonous physical stress
  • Circulation problems

A monitor stand provides a wealth of benefits to both those who work at desks and PC gamers. From health benefits to staying organized, here are the main advantages of using one.
The first and foremost benefit to using an adjustable monitor arm is the ability to change a monitor’s height, depth and sometimes even its angle. This customization allows a person to position their monitor in the exact spot it needs to be to prevent them from straining their neck and eyes while they use it over an extended period. Ideally, the monitor should be placed directly in the center field of vision, so the viewer does not need to look up or down to see their screen. This direct viewing angle prevents them from developing strain-related neck pain.

12 reasons your standing desk is stuck & how to fix it

[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Everyone loves using technology up until it stops working, and if you landed on this article, you’re standing desk isn’t working and you’re not exactly feeling the love.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Given the fact that the desk has electrical components, at one some point, it’s normal that you experience a hiccup. The most common issue is that the electric sit stand desk stops going up or going down. The desk just becomes stuck. [/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]In this blog, I’m going to share the most common reasons a standing desk won’t go up or down and how to fix it. Keep reading to find out how to get your desk back in working condition, and standing desk controller is usually used.. [/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]Why your standing desk won’t go up & how to fix it[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]1. Object is in the way[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]You may have something that’s mounted above the desk that’s stopping it from traveling upwards. The typical culprits are mounted shelves, cabinets, or artwork.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]As a safety measure, many standing desks have a collision detection feature that prevents the desk from hitting another object. When it detects an object in the way, the table will stop moving upwards and then slightly move down, giving you room to remove whatever is in the way.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Check for any items above your standing desk parts that may be getting in the way, and remove them.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]2. Standing desk lost power[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]This typically happens for one of two reasons: the desk was temporarily unplugged and plugged back in OR the outlet lost power.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]In many cases, when a standing desk loses and then regains power, it automatically goes into reset mode. While being in reset mode, a sit stand desk can only travel downwards.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To get your table to move up, you must complete a manual reset on the table.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]3. The legs are uneven[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Over time, the legs on a standing desk with two (or more) motors can become a bit uneven.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]If the motors don’t have a good self-locking mechanism, the motor and spindle can turn when it’s supposed to maintain its height position. While one motor may turn, the second will either remain still or turn more/less than the first motor. Now, the motors are out of sync and your desk is uneven.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Once the desks become uneven, one of two things can happen.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]1.) The standing desk control box (the brains of the desk) finally recognizes that the legs are at different heights and it will stop moving up to prevent any more damage to the desk. [/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]OR[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]2.) The control box isn’t sophisticated enough to recognize the issue, and the desk will continue to move up and down until there’s too much friction within the leg columns, get stuck, and stop moving.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]The desk must do a complete reset in order for the leg to be realigned and even.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]4. Too much weight on the desk[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Every height adjustable table has a maximum lifting capacity. If your desk is trying to support too much weight, an overload can occur. The desk is saying “this is too much work for me to go higher,” and to protect its components, it shuts off. [/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To fix this, just remove some of the weight from your desk. Once you take off enough weight, the desk should automatically turn back on and begin functioning as normal. There’s typically no need for a manual reset.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To help prevent this from happening again, research the lifting capacity of your standing desk. Pay special attention to whether that number is base only or base + worksurface. For example, if the manufacturer states “Total Lifting Capacity Base Only: 325 lbs,” that means whatever you put on top of the base (worksurface, monitors, keyboard tray, etc.) cannot exceed 325 lbs.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]5. The control box cycles out[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]A table’s control box, including Single-Motor Standing Desk Control Box, Dual-Motor Standing Desk Control Box, and Three-Motor Standing Desk Control Box, can only go up and down so many times before it needs to rest. This is something that’s referred to as the Duty Cycle. The Duty cycle tells us the maximum amount of time the control box can be active (moving the desk up or down) and how long it needs to be inactive (in its rest stage).[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]If the control box reaches the maximum amount of active time, it will turn on a mandatory rest period to prevent overheating. So, when you’re desk stops working all of a sudden, don’t panic.[/font]

[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]6.  The power, control box, or motor cables are loose[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]The power, motor, or control box cables can become loose by getting tugged on or stuck. The cause of the tug is often due to a lack of wire management.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]A cable can be pulled out of the socket ever so slightly and still cause power to be intermittent. See the images below to see how to better identify if a cable is securely inserted.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]When the cables become loose, the power within them becomes intermittent, meaning that sometimes the power can flow through them and sometimes it can’t. For many desks, every time the power is lost, the table will go into reset mode.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Before you reset your sit stand desk, check all cables to make sure they’re securely connected. Once you’ve done that, go ahead and reset the desk. [/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To help prevent this problem, use a wire management solution to keep wires out of the way. There are a variety of options available so you can find the one that best suits you.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]7. Desk has an upper container stop [/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]An upper container stop is a setting a user creates to reprogram the desk’s maximum height. So, instead of being able to go to 48”, you can set the max. height to 40”. They’re used to prevent collisions between your sit stand desk and another object, like a cabinet or shelf.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]You will need to either change or delete the upper container stop to make the table go up past the current setting. To do that, follow the instructions provided by the desk’s manufacturer.[/font]

[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]Why your standing desk won’t go down & how to fix it[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]1. Object is in the way[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]There may be an object below the desk that’s stopping it from going down. Common objects include chairs, mobile pedestals, file cabinet, etc.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Many standing desks have a collision detection feature that prevents the desk from hitting another object and causing any harm or damage. When it detects an object in the way, the table will stop moving downwards and then slightly move up, giving you room to remove whatever is in the way. [/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Check under your desk and remove any object that may be blocking its travel.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]2. Too much weight on the desk[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]Every height adjustable table has a maximum lifting capacity. If your desk is trying to support too much weight, an overload can occur. The desk is saying “this is too much work for me to lift” and to protect its components, it shuts off. [/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To fix this, just remove some of the weight off your desk. Your desk should automatically turn back on and begin functioning as normal. There’s typically no need for a manual reset.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]To help prevent this from happening again, research the lifting capacity of your standing desk. Pay special attention to whether that number is base only or base + worksurface. For example, if the manufacturer states “Total Lifting Capacity Base Only: 325 lbs,” that means whatever you put on top of the base (worksurface, monitors, keyboard tray, etc.) cannot exceed 325 lbs. [/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]3. The control box cycles out[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]A table’s control box can only go up and down so many times before it needs to rest. This is something that’s referred to as the Duty Cycle. The Duty cycle tells us the maximum amount of time the control box can be active (moving the desk up or down) and how long it needs to be inactive (in its rest stage).[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]If the control box reaches the maximum amount of active time, it will turn on a mandatory rest period to prevent overheating. So, when you’re desk stops working all of a sudden, don’t panic. [/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]4. Desk has a lower container stop[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]A lower container stop is a setting a user creates to reprogram the desk’s minimum height. So, instead of being able to go all the way down to 24”, you can set the minimum height to 28”. They’re used to prevent collisions between your sit stand desk and another object, like a chair or mobile pedestal.[/font]
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]How to fix this[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]You will need to either change or delete the lower container stop to make the table go up past the current setting. To do that, follow the instructions provided by the desk’s manufacturer.[/font]
 
[font=”PT Sans”, sans-serif]Fixing your standing desk can be overwhelming. Start here.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]There are many different reasons why your standing desk is getting stuck, and it can be challenging to find the correct way to fix it.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]This list may not include every reason for why your sit stand desk won’t go up or down. The table may not be assembled correctly or there may be other manufacturing defects.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]However, this list does share the most common causes and solutions and is a great place to start when you first notice that your desk won’t move.[/font]
[font=”Merriweather Sans”, sans-serif]If you were to call your desk’s manufacturer, technical support likely go through this same troubleshooting list that we went through in this article. Tackling these common causes first on your own can either completely solve the problem, or help save you time on the phone with tech support if it happens to be a malfunctioning issue.[/font]

Process For Closing Unsolvable Help Desk Tickets

Sometimes, on an IT helpdesk, you have tickets with a few shared characteristics.

1) They’re low priority–just minor annoyances to user 2) They’re extremely hard to reproduce for testing 3) You’ve exhausted all troubleshooting possibilities you have at your disposal 4) You’ve spent hours on the ticket

This is fortunately a small percentage of tickets, but they do happen. My approach has been to leave these tickets open indefinitely, eventually to languish in forgotten land. Are there better ways? What are your processes for closing unsolvable tickets?

Moderators and help desk needed

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Looking for 1-2 moderators and 2-3 help desk

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5- what is your major if there is one?