How to detect number of specific object in an image and it’s diameter(size)?

I have two images of IRON RODS (i.e only two images) and I want to detect how many rods are there in each image and get the diameter of each rod in a image?

I don’t know where to start as there are lot of articles regarding object detection and it’s hard to find one for my use-case.

If you can help me with a abstract view on how to model such requirement? Please point me a right direction.

Doubt:

1) How can I train with two images and then how to count numbers of rods are there in each image and retrieve it’s diameter?

Wifi disconnects and is unable to detect networks

I run Ubuntu 19.04, and recently I’ve been unable to connect to WiFi. Upon startup it will detect the available networks, but then changes to showing no networks available. I’m currently dual-booting with Windows 10, which has no such problems, so I don’t believe it’s an issue with the WiFi network itself.

When the problem first appeared I could often solve it by booting up Windows, then restarting and using Ubuntu, but that doesn’t seem to be working anymore.

Any help or pointers greatly appreciated.

$   iwconfig docker0   no wireless extensions.  enp0s31f6  no wireless extensions.  wlp2s0    IEEE 802.11  ESSID:off/any             Mode:Managed  Access Point: Not-Associated   Tx-Power=22 dBm              Retry short limit:7   RTS thr:off   Fragment thr:off           Power Management:on  lo        no wireless extensions.  bnep0     no wireless extensions. 
$   dmesg | grep wlp2s0 [    3.659184] iwlwifi 0000:02:00.0 wlp2s0: renamed from wlan0 [    8.550927] wlp2s0: authenticate with 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 [    8.564258] wlp2s0: send auth to 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 (try 1/3) [    8.571202] wlp2s0: authenticated [    8.575167] wlp2s0: associate with 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 (try 1/3) [    8.577793] wlp2s0: RX AssocResp from 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 (capab=0x1431 status=0 aid=1) [    8.579689] wlp2s0: associated [    8.612308] wlp2s0: Limiting TX power to 36 (36 - 0) dBm as advertised by 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 [    8.831503] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_CHANGE): wlp2s0: link becomes ready [   19.089777] p2p-dev-wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x0 [   19.089931] wlp2s0: deauthenticating from 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 by local choice (Reason: 3=DEAUTH_LEAVING) [   19.089934] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.090299] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.090516] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.090706] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.090941] wlp2s0: HW problem - can not stop rx aggregation for 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81 tid 0 [   19.090954] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.091597] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.091916] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.092131] wlp2s0: failed to remove key (0, 38:17:c3:8b:c2:81) from hardware (-5) [   19.092153] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.092526] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.092884] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093104] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093285] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093462] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093639] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093816] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.093992] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.094181] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.094838] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 [   19.095179] wlp2s0: failed to remove key (1, ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff) from hardware (-5) [   19.095427] wlp2s0:  Failed check-sdata-in-driver check, flags: 0x4 

Ubuntu 18.04 boot from external SSD, unable to detect laptop GPU

So I used to have a workstation which I assembled, with a Samsung 970 pro ssd, on which I installed and ran Ubuntu 18.04 perfectly.The workstation was a desktop, and the GPU was an NVIDIA TitanXp. Everything worked perfectly.

I ended up moving out of that workplace, but I kept the drive since that was of my own personal accord. I bought an external ssd enclosure, and decided that I could plug it into my ASUS ROG Strix laptop and boot my Linux drive and everything should work perfectly. It didn’t. While all system functions work perfectly, it doesn’t detect the GPU on my laptop. It just detects the Intel graphics. Is there a way I can get it to detect my laptop’s native GPU while booting it from an external SSD enclosure?

At what area and distance can a character detect a trap?

At what area and distance can a character detect a trap when actively searching? And on which with passive.

Hypothetically. Suppose that in front of the character is a corridor 30 squares long and 3 squares wide. There are five traps in the corridor, each 3 square wide and 1 square long. The player assumes that there are traps in the corridor and begins to actively search for them. How many traps and how far is he able to spot?

And exactly the same question but if the character is not looking for traps relying only on passive perception.

Deadly corridor

How could I block or at least detect the use of ultrasonic side channels or Google Nearby Messages API on my smartphone?

My question is about the use of ultrasonic messages that are part of the modern advertising ecosystem and are also used by the Google Nearby Messages API.

When it comes to advertising, the type of ultrasonic messages that I am referring to are described in this Wired article titled “How to Block the Ultrasonic Signals You Didn’t Know Were Tracking You”, from 2016. The article says (emphasis added):

The technology, called ultrasonic cross-device tracking, embeds high-frequency tones that are inaudible to humans in advertisements, web pages, and even physical locations like retail stores. These ultrasound “beacons” emit their audio sequences with speakers, and almost any device microphone—like those accessed by an app on a smartphone or tablet—can detect the signal and start to put together a picture of what ads you’ve seen, what sites you’ve perused, and even where you’ve been.

The Wired article also mentions that:

Now that you’re sufficiently concerned, the good news is that at the Black Hat Europe security conference on Thursday, a group based at University of California, Santa Barbara will present an Android patch and a Chrome extension that give consumers more control over the transmission and receipt of ultrasonic pitches on their devices.

Being that the article was from 2016, I looked at the Black Hat Europe conference from that year for more information about the Android patch. The presentation mentioned in the Wired article seems to be this one.

The presentation slides (available here) led me to the ubeacsec.org website where the researchers do have an android patch as mentioned in the Wired article. Alas that patch is a research prototype made for android-5.0.0_r3.

There is also this research paper from 2017, titled “Privacy Threats through Ultrasonic Side Channels on Mobile Devices”. The authors of this paper found out for example that

  • Advertising platforms such as Google’s Universal Analytics and Facebook’s Conversion Pixel provided services utilizing this technology. The researchers analyzed three commercial solutions: Shopkick, Lisnr and Silverpush.
  • 234 Android applications analyzed by the researchers were constantly listening for ultrasonic beacons.
  • Out of 35 stores visited in European cities, 4 were using ultrasonic beacons at the time of the research.

Anyway my interest is not just about blocking advertising trackers. Even though the marketing departments may be the largest consumer of this technology, it can be utilized in many other ways as well.

And this issue is related to another technology, namely the Google Nearby Messages API. The overview document written by Google about this technology (here) says that (emphasis added):

The Nearby Messages API is a publish-subscribe API that lets you pass small binary payloads between internet-connected Android and iOS devices. The devices don’t have to be on the same network, but they do have to be connected to the Internet.

Nearby uses a combination of Bluetooth, Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi and near-ultrasonic audio to communicate a unique-in-time pairing code between devices.

The concerns about the Nearby Messages API are:

  1. Its ability to pass small binary payloads, i.e. presumably executable code.
  2. That while it is easy to disable Bluetooth and WiFi on a smart phone, it is not so easy to disable the microphone.

Question:

Are there ways to block or at least detect the use of ultrasonic side channels or Google Nearby Messages API on my smartphone?

Not able to detect TP-LINK Archer T6E

I recently bought. The lspci command doesn’t detect it. I found on this website than the chipset used is “Broadcom BCM4352” but there is no mention of Broadcom on the doc or on the website of the TP-Link’s product.

I tried to install broadcom-wl by following instructions on this Github page but I’ve no result.

Here is the result of lspci :

00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Xeon E3-1200 v2/3rd Gen Core processor DRAM Controller (rev 09) 00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB xHCI Host Controller (rev 04) 00:16.0 Communication controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family MEI Controller #1 (rev 04) 00:1a.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host Controller #2 (rev 04) 00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family High Definition Audio Controller (rev 04) 00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port 1 (rev c4) 00:1c.5 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 PCI Bridge (rev c4) 00:1c.6 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port 7 (rev c4) 00:1c.7 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port 8 (rev c4) 00:1d.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host Controller #1 (rev 04) 00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation Z77 Express Chipset LPC Controller (rev 04) 00:1f.2 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family 4-port SATA Controller [IDE mode] (rev 04) 00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family SMBus Controller (rev 04) 00:1f.5 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family 2-port SATA Controller [IDE mode] (rev 04) 01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Cape Verde XT [Radeon HD 7770/8760 / R7 250X] 01:00.1 Audio device: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Oland/Hainan/Cape Verde/Pitcairn HDMI Audio [Radeon HD 7000 Series] 02:00.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 PCI Bridge (rev 41) 04:00.0 Ethernet controller: Qualcomm Atheros AR8151 v2.0 Gigabit Ethernet (rev c0) 05:00.0 USB controller: Etron Technology, Inc. EJ168 USB 3.0 Host Controller (rev 01) 

And my /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf file :

# This file lists those modules which we don't want to be loaded by # alias expansion, usually so some other driver will be loaded for the # device instead.  # evbug is a debug tool that should be loaded explicitly blacklist evbug  # these drivers are very simple, the HID drivers are usually preferred blacklist usbmouse blacklist usbkbd  # replaced by e100 blacklist eepro100  # replaced by tulip blacklist de4x5  # causes no end of confusion by creating unexpected network interfaces blacklist eth1394  # snd_intel8x0m can interfere with snd_intel8x0, doesn't seem to support much # hardware on its own (Ubuntu bug #2011, #6810) blacklist snd_intel8x0m  # Conflicts with dvb driver (which is better for handling this device) blacklist snd_aw2  # replaced by p54pci blacklist prism54  # replaced by b43 and ssb. blacklist bcm43xx  # most apps now use garmin usb driver directly (Ubuntu: #114565) blacklist garmin_gps  # replaced by asus-laptop (Ubuntu: #184721) blacklist asus_acpi  # low-quality, just noise when being used for sound playback, causes # hangs at desktop session start (Ubuntu: #246969) blacklist snd_pcsp  # ugly and loud noise, getting on everyone's nerves; this should be done by a # nice pulseaudio bing (Ubuntu: #77010) blacklist pcspkr  # EDAC driver for amd76x clashes with the agp driver preventing the aperture # from being initialised (Ubuntu: #297750). Blacklist so that the driver # continues to build and is installable for the few cases where its # really needed. blacklist amd76x_edac  # wireless drivers (conflict with Broadcom hybrid wireless driver 'wl') blacklist ssb blacklist bcma blacklist b43 blacklist brcmsmac 

There’s no mention of the support of Ubuntu but I assumed than it should be correct because the Chipset seems to be supported. I was wrong? What can I do?