Does the light from Branding Smite persist after the target dies? [duplicate]

The players were exploring Castle Ravenloft. A trap separated the human paladin from the rest of the party and placed him in a deep pit with no light source. In looking for a way out, he accidently released and then began to fight a wight. This was initially quite bad as he was attacking with disadvantage, while the wight (with darkvision) was attacking twice with advantage. The paladin remedied this by casting Branding Smite, hitting the wight, and making it glow.

Branding Smite, emphasis mine:

The next time you hit a creature with a weapon attack before this spell ends, the weapon gleams with astral radiance as you strike. The attack deals an extra 2d6 radiant damage to the target, which becomes visible if it is invisible, and the target sheds dim light in a 5-foot radius and can’t become invisible until the spell ends.

After two more hits and some Divine Smite, the wight was dead. The paladin wanted to hack off a piece of the glowing wight corpse and use it as a light source to help him climb out of the pit (spell duration is Concentration – 1 minute, the paladin needed three rounds to climb out of the pit). I hesitated, because when the wight ceased to be undead and became just dead, it was transformed from a creature into an object and was thus no longer a valid target of the spell.

Ultimately I ruled that one thing is a valid target for casting the spell itself, another is the persistent effects of the spell, and that the corpse would go on glowing for the duration. However, I would like to know RAW for this and whether all the effects of the spell would cease when the wight was killed.

Related: Is a target suppressed or removed when the target becomes invalid?. Superficially this might appear like a duplicate of my question. However, the question there is about the dominate person spell when the target is no longer a Humanoid because of polymorph. Obviously dominate person cannot continue to work if the target is no longer a Humanoid to dominate, but a dead wight could still continue to be a source of light. I feel like that question is a different situation than Branding Smite where the 2d6 radiant damage is the spell itself and the light produced is a persistent effect of the spell. Maybe the answer is not different, but I believe the question is different enough that it stands on its own.

Also, although not a reason to say that this is not a duplicate, I am unsatisfied with the accepted answer to that question being based on a Crawford tweet.

What happens when a Changeling dies on the Dreaming?

On Changeling: The Dreaming 20th Anniversary, I find two seemingly contradictory texts. On page 291, speaking of chimerical death:

Those who suffer a chimerical death while in the Dreaming are expelled from it, waking up in the Autumn world with no memory of how they got there.

I understand in this that you die in the Dreaming, and wake up on the normal world (autumn world) having lost your fae memories, just as any chimerical death.

But on the Dreaming chapter, something much more dangerous is described (page 300):

The Dreaming makes no distinction between chimerical damage (and death) and physical death. A changeling that suffers either form of death in the Dreaming dies, their soul passing on to a new incarnation (or, in the case of Arcadian sidhe, disappearing for parts unknown). For someone with an anchor in the Autumn world, death means that the physical body falls into a coma and wastes away.

The first sentence says that once you die in the dreaming, that’s it. You’re as dead as if you had mundane bullet in your brains. You go to your next reincarnation. I understand the second sentence as referred to people to people that are not changeling, enchanted, and maybe prodigals that found their way into the Dreaming.

For me it seems that both chapters contradict themselves. Is there an official explanation on this? How did death happen on previous editions?

What happens to the contents of Leomund’s Secret Chest when the caster dies?

The spell Leomund’s Secret Chest allows you to hide a chest full of goodies on the Ethereal Plane. According to the spell, the caster may use an action to return the chest to the Prime Material:

While the chest remains on the Ethereal Plane, you can use an action and touch the replica to recall the chest. It appears in an unoccupied space on the ground within 5 feet of you.

So, it is unclear whether anyone else may retrieve the loot chest, say after killing the caster. According to the spell:

If the spell ends and the larger chest is on the Ethereal Plane, it is irretrievably lost.

Does the death of the caster cause the spell to end? If not, is the loot chest essentially lost?

If a player casts Hunter’s Mark and the target dies and combat ends, is the spell still functioning for a later combat? [duplicate]

I’m a new DM and new to this forum!

I’m running a game and one of my players is playing a ranger, we’re all still pretty new to the game and ran into a question about how one of her spells, Hunter’s Mark works.

Here’s what happened. We had a short combat in which the player cast Hunter’s Mark on one of the guards. He and the other guards were all eventually killed and combat ended. The players then proceeded to finish sneaking into the house they were trying to break into. A few minutes later, the group ran into another set of guards. So here’s where my question comes into play. Is her former Hunter’s Mark still active?

I thought no, since she did not mark a new Hunter’s Mark target "on a subsequent turn of yours," since the original combat had ended and we had therefore left turns. She thought it was still working, since the duration of the spell is one hour, and that hadn’t passed yet.

Thanks for your insight!

How can I quickly get a player back into a session after their character dies?

As a GM, what kind of techniques could I use to help a player re-join the gaming session after their character dies? I want to avoid any major interruptions to the flow of the adventure. I would also like to avoid having to end the session immediately or making them sit on the side-lines for the rest of the session.

If a creature dies when under the effect of a polymorph ability, does it ever revert to its true form?

Say a creature has polymorphed itself. For instance, a dandasuka using its Change Shape ability. If it dies, will it naturally revert to its true form? If so, when? I don’t see any info about this in the Polymorph trait’s rules.

If there aren’t any cut-and-dry rules about this, does any official literature suggest one way or another?

What happens if a mage dies with multiple clones?

Imagine that a PC has created multiple clones, through the casting of clone, each matured.

What happens when that PC dies and declares his soul willing to go to each clone? I understand that the character could avoid this problem by declaring himself only willing to go to one particular clone, but if he did not, what would happen?

Would he occupy his first clone? The most recent? A random one? One of the player’s choosing? DM’s choosing? Or is it just DM perview?

What happens when an Enlarged Creature dies?

Enlarge says it works on both creatures and objects. The spell doesn’t specify what happens when a creature dies and the way I understand it is that a living, breathing creature becomes an object when it dies since objects are neither living, nor breathing.

So does the creature become a new object of the size it originally had or does the object carry over the Enlarge status of the creature and within the minute returns to normal size?

I can see both things happening, within reason. What I’m looking to do is Enlarge a critter, kill it, and take it back to our hosts to eat, so I’m wondering what would happen en route to the cooking pot.

What happens to clones a deepspawn created if/when the deepspawn dies? (D&D mechanics and/or lore)

I am running a 5E homebrew campaign where a powerful creature akin to a deepspawn is consuming and creating spawn of powerful beings in various governments and organizations to puppet a growing portion of civilization.

My question is should my players succeed in finding and destroying this creature, what have past editions and/or D&D literature said about the fate of the spawn it had created?

Since this is homebrew I know I can pretty much do whatever I want, but I’m looking for insights into how to handle it so I have a plan in place.

I only have access to the Lost Empires of Faerun 4E book regarding them, and though it goes into detail about how the spawn are created and what the spawns’ capabilities are, it does not mention anything about the spawns’ existence after the deepspawn is slain.

Any examples from D&D literature or rulebooks would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!