Difference between WordPress and Webflow

In regards to blogging, what is the difference between WordPress and Webflow? According to Wikipedia, WordPress is a content mangement system (CMS) and Webflow is a "software as a service for website building and hosting". Webflow gets compared to Squarespace, Weebly, Wix, and Webydo — but not WordPress. Is it that Webflow and friends are a higher level abstraction that may include a CMS?

Is there a difference between “damage taken” and “damage dealt”?

This question is prompted by parts of How much damage can the Guardian of Faith spell deal?, If someone casts Vampiric Touch on a creature with necrotic absorption, does the caster take damage?, and this answer.

I am hoping for a more conclusive understanding of whether, within the mechanics of 5e, there is a difference between damage taken by a creature and damage dealt to a creature.

Is there a difference between any of the following aside from phrasing:

  • Gaspar took 8 points of damage from Joan’s attack
  • Gaspar was dealt 8 points of damage by Joan
  • Joan’s attack against Gaspar dealt 8 points of damage

Or rather is there a difference between "A creature hit by your attack takes 1d8 points of damage" and "Your attack deals 1d8 damage to the creature it hits"?

PostgreSQL Function – Finding the difference between 2 times

I want to create a simple function in Postgres to find the difference between 2 TIME – not TIMESTAMP. As show below, it accepts 4 parameters: hour, minute, second and expire (hour). In this example I have commented out seconds, just working on minutes.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION time_diff(hr INT, min INT, sec INT, exp_hr INT) RETURNS INT LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $  $   DECLARE     cur_time    TIME;     expire_time TIME;      diff_interval INTERVAL;     diff INT = 0; BEGIN     cur_time    = CONCAT(hr,  ':',  min, ':', sec) AS TIME; -- cast hour, minutes and seconds to TIME     expire_time = CONCAT(exp_hr, ':00:00') AS TIME;         -- cast expire hour to TIME      -- MINUS operator for TIME returns interval 'HH:MI:SS;     diff_interval = expire_time - cur_time;      diff = DATE_PART('hour', diff_interval);      diff = diff * 60 + DATE_PART('minute', diff_interval);      --diff = diff * 60 + DATE_PART('second', diff_interval);      RETURN diff; END; $  $  ; 

Example: 01:15:00 – 02:00:00 should give me 45 minutes, so I do the following and I get the correct answer.

select * from time_diff(1, 15, 0, 2); 

However, if I do this: 23:15:00 – 01:00:00 – the should give me 105 minutes (60 + 45).

select * from time_diff(23, 15, 0, 1); 

But the result I am getting is -1335. I am trying to work out where I have gone wrong here.

Also I am invoking DATE_PART functions, this seems to be a quite an expensive process in terms of CPU usage. Is there a better way of optimising this function. With the first example I am getting results in 0.007s on 2018 i7 Mac mini. Although I do think this function is quick, but could it be better?

Thanks

Difference between masterwork tools and skill boost item?

I have a player who wants to buy masterwork tools as opposed to buying magic items that boost his skills.

The reason being, masterwork tools grant a +2 bonus to a skill and cost 50gp.

Magic items that grant bonuses to skills cost (bonus) squared x 100, meaning a +2 magic item costs 400gp.

So i guess my question is…. what is the difference between a masterwork tool and a magic item that grants the same bonus? Are there certain skills you cannot have tools for? Was that the intent?

Is MySQL more scalable than PostgreSQL due to the difference in how they handle connections?

I’m trying to decide if either MySQL or PostgreSQL would be more suitable for an application that will get hit by potentially thousands of simultaneous requests at a time.

During research, one fact that stands out is that PostgreSQL forks a new process for each connection, whereas MySQL creates a new thread to handle each connection.

  • Does this mean that MySQL is more efficient than PostgreSQL at handling many concurrent connections?

  • How much of an impact does this difference have on how well both systems scale? Is it something that I should worry about to begin with?

What is the difference between a Whip and Scorpion Whip? [duplicate]

I’m building a whip character, and one of the class features I get allows me to pick one exotic light or one-handed melee weapon that has the disarm or trip special feature and become proficient with it. I get this from the Magus archetype Spire Defender. I like the fact that the scorpion whip allows me to deal lethal damage, regardless of natural armor and armor, but its description confuses me.

A whip is a exotic light weapon, and a scorpion whip is a exotic one-handed weapon.

Whip

A whip deals no damage to any creature with an armor bonus of +1 or higher or a natural armor bonus of +3 or higher. The whip is treated as a melee weapon with 15-foot reach, though you don’t threaten the area into which you can make an attack. In addition, unlike most other weapons with reach, you can use it against foes anywhere within your reach (including adjacent foes).

Using a whip provokes an attack of opportunity, just as if you had used a ranged weapon.

You can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to attack rolls with a whip sized for you, even though it isn’t a light weapon.

Weapon Feature(s): finesse, reach.

Scorpion Whip

Benefit: It deals lethal damage, even to creatures with armor bonuses. If you are proficient with both scorpion whips and whips, you can use a scorpion whip in either the normal way, as a typical light performance weapon, or as a whip.

If you are proficient with both the scorpion whip and whip, you can use a scorpion whip in either the normal way (as a light performance weapon) or as a whip. When you use a scorpion whip as a whip, it is equivalent to a whip, but deals lethal damage and can harm creatures regardless of their armor bonus.

Weapon Feature(s): performance (plus disarm, reach, and trip if you are proficient with whip.)

Performance

When wielding this weapon, if an attack or combat maneuver made with this weapon prompts a combat performance check, you gain a +2 bonus on that check. See Gladiator Weapons below for more information.

So what is the normal way of a light performance weapon, and how exactly does that differ from a whip?

Difference in light between Unity 5.5.2f1 and Unity 2019

The lighting is different between Unity 5.5.2f1 and Unity 2019. Please see the attached image.enter image description here

I dislike the way the lighting is done in the 2019 version. Both verions are installed out of the box, without any additions.

What do I need to change / set up inside Unity 2019, in order to have the exact lighting as in 5.5.2f1 version?

Is there a meaningful difference between giving a monster multiattack and giving it multiple turns per round?

I’m creating a CR21 boss for my medium-level party of six players to fight. I know that action economy is a big disadvantage for a single enemy fighting an entire party, so I’m giving the boss the ability to attack 4 times per turn (20-35 damage per most attacks).

I know the most common way to give a creature multiple attacks is to give it Multiattack, an action that allows it to use its attack abilities several times in one go. I’m considering instead rolling initiative for the boss 4 times and giving it a whole turn for each initiative value, giving it 4 separate attacks.

Will this have a significantly different effect on the battle than giving the boss a standard multiattack?


A couple thoughts I’ve had:

  • This allows the boss to use more bonus actions per round. The boss I’m designing doesn’t have any nonstandard bonus actions, so I don’t think this will make a big difference.
  • This allows the boss to move more often. I’ve divided the speed I want the boss to have by the number of turns it gets per round, so its total movement per round will be the same.
  • This gives the boss more reactions. I can see this making it quite a but more difficult. I’m not planning on using many reactions when I play the boss, though.