ASI or War Caster for first feat? (Divination Wizard 4/Knowledge Cleric 1)

My rock gnome divination wizard recently leveled up to level 5 and I can choose between taking a feat and an ASI (I have a 1-level dip into knowledge cleric). I’m mostly looking to play a controller/debuffer in battle, so I’m a bit stuck since my spells require concentration (which War Caster helps with) but my save DC depends on intelligence.

Due to multiclassing requirements, my stats are a bit weird: 8 Str, 14 Dex, 14 Con, 17 Int, 13 Wis, and 9 Cha

So, should I go for an ASI or for War Caster (or maybe another feat like Resilient (Con) or Lucky)?

Thanks!

Can a Divination wizard in the Border Ethereal use the Portent feature to influence rolls of creatures on the Material Plane?

A particular School of Divination wizard is native to the Ethereal Plane (he was created by a wish spell replicating simulacrum cast on that plane).

While this wizard is in the Border Ethereal, can he use his Portent feature to affect the rolls of creatures on the Material Plane?

How can gambling work in a world where magical divination is possible?

In a DnD 3.5 universe, could a spell such as Divination or Commune allow the caster to cheat at betting on sporting events? (For example, by asking a question like “Will Stan Stormbow win in this gladitorial match”).

Is there any in-universe way around this, such as a abjuration that could be cast on the arena to prevent such divinations?

Using Divination Spells for Droskar’s Guiding Ring

Here is the description of Droskar’s Guiding Ring:

This gold ring is misshapen and uncomfortable to wear for long periods of time; inscribed on it is a crude symbol of a fire burning under an arch. Once per day, the wearer may use charm person. If Droskar is the wearer’s patron deity, any time the wearer crafts a magic item, she may choose to pay half of the item’s construction cost instead of the full cost. The wearer spends time working on the item normally, but at the time of completion there is a 50% chance that the item turns out nonmagical and worthless. For example, if creating a magic bracer that normally costs 1,000 gp to craft, the wearer may craft it for only 500 gp, but there is a 50% chance the wearer’s shortcuts and cheap materials result in a valueless, nonfunctional item.

The description of Divination:

Similar to augury but more powerful, a divination spell can provide you with a useful piece of advice in reply to a question concerning a specific goal, event, or activity that is to occur within 1 week. The advice granted by the spell can be as simple as a short phrase, or it might take the form of a cryptic rhyme or omen. If your party doesn’t act on the information, the conditions may change so that the information is no longer useful. The base chance for a correct divination is 70% + 1% per caster level, to a maximum of 90%. If the die roll fails, you know the spell failed, unless specific magic yielding false information is at work.

As with augury, multiple divinations about the same topic by the same caster use the same dice result as the first divination spell and yield the same answer each time.

The description of Augury:

An augury can tell you whether a particular action will bring good or bad results for you in the immediate future.

The base chance for receiving a meaningful reply is 70% + 1% per caster level, to a maximum of 90%; this roll is made secretly. A question may be so straightforward that a successful result is automatic, or so vague as to have no chance of success. If the augury succeeds, you get one of four results:

  • Weal (if the action will probably bring good results).
  • Woe (for bad results).
  • Weal and woe (for both).
  • Nothing (for actions that don’t have especially good or bad results).

If the spell fails, you get the “nothing” result. A cleric who gets the “nothing” result has no way to tell whether it was the consequence of a failed or successful augury.

The augury can see into the future only about half an hour, so anything that might happen after that does not affect the result. Thus, the result might not take into account the long-term consequences of a contemplated action. All auguries cast by the same person about the same topic use the same die result as the first casting.

Could one use Augury or Divination to predict the result of Droskar’s Guiding Ring, allowing an almost 100% success rate with it?*

*Especially if you use something like Messenger of Fate to get a 100 percent success rate with your divination spells.

Can Rainbow Servant be combined with Versatile Spellcaster and Spontaneous Divination to cast all Cleric spells spontaneously?

A ridiculous idea has occurred to me and I’m looking to verify if really works. Consider the following build:

  • Wizard 5/Rainbow Servant 10 (a class from Complete Divine)
  • At Wizard 5, take Spontaneous Divination from Complete Champion so that you qualify for Versatile Spellcaster from Races of the Dragon.
  • Take Versatile Spellcaster at some point.
  • At Rainbow Servant 10, you gain access to the entire Cleric spell list.
  • Put together, Versatile Spellcaster and Rainbow Servant 10 should let a Wizard cast spontaneously from the entire Cleric spell list.

This gives me two questions, the first as a focus and the second as a supplemental:

  1. Does this actually work? My first objection is that I’m not quite sure if the Wizard automatically knows all of the Cleric spells at Rainbow Servant 10. If you have to record them in your spellbook, you’ll soon run out of gold.
  2. If this does work, can the "powerful non-Diviner spellcaster class that can also cast spontaneously from the entire Cleric spell list" idea be done better? The term "Rainbow Warake" seems to be in my memory.

What are outcome-changing circumstances mentioned in Augury and Divination?

This is one of those naval-gazing questions that may have actual mechanical bearing. Both Augury and Divination predict the outcome of future events:
In the case of Augury

“the results of a specific course of action that you plan to take within the next 30 minutes”

and in the case of Divination

“a specific goal, event, or activity to occur within 7 days”

Where I’m having trouble is deciphering the caveat found in both spells:

The spell doesn’t take into account any possible circumstances that might change the outcome, such as the casting of additional spells or the loss or gain of a companion.

A plain reading of this seems absurd to me, basically amounting to
“outcome X will happen unless circumstances are such that outcome X does not happen”
or
“outcome X will happen unless it doesn’t.”

For example, a prediction of “you will defeat the evil warlock” might have a possible outcome-altering circumstance of “his archdevil patron makes a surprise appearance and obliterates your entire party in an instant.”

I can see a more charitable reading: “Outcome X will happen unless the party introduces outcome-altering circumstances. And this helps particularly in the case of Augury: There is only so much a party can do to alter the course of the events up to 30 minutes from now. But with Divination’s seven days? How is a party ever to know what contingent facts must hold in order for the predicted outcome to occur? What are “additional spells” when, for some members of the party, spellcasting is done as a matter of course?

What counts as a “specific goal, event, or activity” for the Divination spell?

The divination spell states:

Similar to augury but more powerful, a divination spell can provide you with a useful piece of advice in reply to a question concerning a specific goal, event, or activity that is to occur within 1 week.

I’m not sure what limitations the language about “a specific goal, event, or activity” imposes. The immediate motivation for this comes from a Kingmaker campaign that I’m currently running. After an attack on their capital, my players came up with the idea of casting divination once a week to ask “Will anything attack our kingdom this week?”

I’m trying to figure out if this is specific enough, and if not, what would be specific enough. On one hand, it’s not a specific event – they aren’t expecting any particular attack. On the other hand, it’s arguably a specific goal – keeping their citizens safe from large-scale threats.

Also, I expect my players to use divination many times during this campaign, so I’d like to know how this language limits the spell beyond this one case.

What happens if a Divination wizard uses the Portent feature to replace an enemy’s initiative roll, when the DM rolls once for a group of enemies?

Say 4 goblins ambush a level 2 party, everyone is surprised but the Wizard decides to use his Portent feature to influence the initiative roll of the enemy. One of his portents is a natural 1, and he uses that die to replace the initiative roll.

Do all 4 of the goblins’ initiative change to 1 or does just one goblin change?

Here’s what I got from a reading of the PHB:

PHB 189

Initiative

… When combat starts, every participant makes a Dexterity Check to determine their place in the initiative order. The DM makes one roll for an entire group of identical creatures, so each member of the group acts at the same time…

Emphasis mine. Reading the bolded text, it seems that in cases of identical creatures, Portent can effectively cripple the entire initiative of the opposing team.

However, when you read the first sentence, it seems that the entire group shouldn’t be crippled by a single portent roll as each creature should be rolling separately and the bolded text really just says, “hey, don’t waste your time on rolling for each goblin. Just roll once and they all go together.”

A big factor of my hesitance to rule on the side of the first interpretation, is that it seems too overpowered for a 2nd-level feature.

So which is which? Am I missing something?

Can a Divination use the Portent feature on themself while blinded?

The blinded condition states (emphasis mine):

A blinded creature can’t see and automatically fails any ability check that requires sight. […]

Meanwhile the Divination Wizard’s Portent feature states (emphasis mine):

[…] You can replace any attack roll, saving throw, or ability check made by you or a creature that you can see with one of these foretelling rolls. […]

It seems clear to me that a Divination Wizard could not use the Portent feature on another creature while the Wizard is blinded because the target would no longer be a creature they could see. However, I’m unsure how this applies when changing one of the Wizard’s own rolls.

Can a Divination Wizard really use the Portent feature while blinded but only on their own rolls?