Can an unconscious person drink a potion?

PHB 153 reads:

Potion of Healing. A character who drinks the magical red fluid in this vial regains 2d4 + 2 hit points. Drinking or administering a potion takes an action.

By my interpretation, this means that while the rules are flexible in regards to who has to spend the action, they are inflexible in that a character must still actually drink the potion. In other words, any character can administer a potion to save someone else’s action, but their target must be conscious and able to drink.

I know part of a DM’s job is to apply common sense to my rulings, and common sense tells me that an unconscious person is more likely to choke to death than to swallow 4oz of liquid.

A few of my players disagree. Who’s right in this situation?

Can the Command spell be used to force someone to drink poison?

The Command spell does the following:

You speak a one-word command to a creature you can see within range. The target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or follow the command on its next turn. The spell has no Effect if the target is Undead, if it doesn’t understand your language, or if your command is directly harmful to it.

Can the Command spell be used in combat to force a foe to drink poison?

Presumably, the caster would hold out a vial of poison when giving the order.

[ Other – Food & Drink ] Open Question : Can you freeze tinned food?

When coronavirus happened I got carried away and panic bought tinned food. I know have approximately 48 cans of tomato soup  24 cans of chicken soup 24 cans of vegetable soup 48 cans of corned beef 48 cans of baked beans 48 cans of marrowfat peas 24 cans of potatoes 8 cans of sweetcorn  12 cans of tuna chunks  8 cans of chilli con carne Obviously it’s going to take a while to get through all of that. Is it possible to store these goods in the freezer to extend their shelf life?

Would it harm game balance to allow the Haste action to be used to drink a potion?

RAW, Haste specifies:

[The target] gains an additional action on each of its turns. That action can be used only to take the Attack (one weapon attack only), Dash, Disengage, Hide, or Use an Object action.

And it has already been stablished that “Use an object” is not valid to use a magic item which to my understanding includes drinking a potion.

So my question is, would it break balance much to actually disregard that and allow the drinking of a potion as one of the actions granted by Haste?

In the Descent into Avernus adventure, all food and drink tastes bad when consumed in Avernus. How can we avoid this problem?

In the Baldur’s Gate: Descent into Avernus adventure, all food and drink tastes horrible to our characters when it is consumed in Avernus. If we eat or drink anything, we must roll to not vomit. Would there be a way around this, like destroying our taste buds? Is there a better way?

Are Warforged required to eat and drink?

Do Warforged (from Eberron) need to eat and drink to survive like Humans/elves/dwarves/etc?

If not, what daily maintenance and sustenance to they require?

Specifically, i’m looking for answers on these two subjects

1 – DnD 5e Game rules about Warforged and food/drink

2 – Eberron Lore concerning how Warforged were maintained in the Wars

edit: clarification

Can the Purify Food and Drink pell make ocean/sea water drinkable?

As the title says, can the spell purify food and drink make ocean water clean and drinkable?

The spell says:

All nonmagical food and drink within a 5-foot-radius sphere centered on a point of your choice within range is purified and rendered free of poison and disease.

Some in my group say you would purify the water, therefore it is drinkable, absent salt. But others in my group argue that salt is not inherently bad, so while the spell may remove the impurities along with other poisons/diseases from ocean water, it wouldn’t remove the salt.

Someone else brought up the argument that, for example, if someone had a cup of some juice, which would have a little bit of salt, the spell wouldn’t have removed the salt then. Or what if someone was cooking and accidentally spilled extra salt in it – would the spell have removed the salt then?

So would the spell make ocean water clean and drinkable (RAW)?

Does a Thief rogue’s Fast Hands allow you to drink a potion as a bonus action?

A recent D&D Beyond article, Epic House Rules: Potion Toxicity and Quick Drinking, mentioned this houserule:

Variant: Quick Potion Drinking

You can use a bonus action, instead of an action, to drink a potion you’re holding.

I mentioned in a comment:

The only reason I wouldn’t use the Quick Potion Drinking rule is if there was a Rogue with the Thief archetype in the party, since it kinda short changes their Fast Hands class feature (the “take the Use an Object action” part).

My reasoning was that a Thief rogue might feel less special if everyone can do something that RAW only they would be able to do. For reference, here’s what Fast Hands says (PHB, p. 97):

Starting at 3rd level, you can use the bonus action granted by your Cunning Action to make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check, use your thieves’ tools to disarm a trap or open a lock, or take the Use an Object action.

Then another user, JamieMcGuire47, replied to my comment with the following information:

@nathanES RAW, you cannot do this. If a magic item (magic is the keyword here, as it divides regular item interaction from magic item interaction) specifically requires the use of an action to activate its ability, the Use an Object action does not apply to it (including fast hands).

The DMG pg.139 discuses potions:

Potions are consumable magic items. Drinking a potion or administering it to another character requires an action.

The DMG p. 141 discusses activating magic items:

“If an item requires an action to activate, that action isn’t a function of the Use an Item action, so a feature such as the rogue’s Fast Hands can’t be used to activate the item.

This suggests that, RAW, Fast Hands does not allow you to drink, say, a potion of healing as a bonus action. If this is the case, I would have to reassess whether or not I would use that rule (since apparently, it doesn’t short change the Thief rogue after all).

JamieMcGuire47’s reasoning and evidence looks pretty solid to me, and the only consensus I’ve found on this site seem to agree (although it doesn’t really go into proving that assertion); see: What items can a Thief use as a bonus action with his Fast Hands?

Is JamieMcGuire47 correct? Can a Thief rogue not use Fast Hands to drink a potion for the reasons stated?

Can you drink poisoned ale as an object interaction?

Inspired by the question “What is the cheapest way to damage myself and trigger the effects of the Fade Away feat?” I am now wondering whether you can drink a flagon of poisoned ale as an object interaction.

The list of things you can do with your object interaction includes:

  • drink all the ale in a flagon

There are also poisons which activate when ingested such as the Assassin’s Blood (Ingested) Poison which states:

A creature subjected to this poison must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, it takes 6 (1d12) poison damage and is poisoned for 24 hours. On a successful save, the creature takes half damage and isn’t poisoned.

The section on ingested poisons states:

A creature must swallow an entire dose of ingested poison to suffer its effects. The dose can be delivered in food or a liquid. You may decide that a partial dose has a reduced effect, such as allowing advantage on the saving throw or dealing only half damage on a failed save.

I am wondering if there are rules that I’ve missed somewhere detailing poisoning things like this. Are there rules that clarify further whether you can drink poisoned ale as an object interaction, thus dealing damage to yourself?


Two reasons you may want to do this:
To damage yourself in order to activate the Fade Away feat.
To damage yourself in order to prevent Barbarian Rage from ending.

Can you drink poisoned ale as an object interaction?

Inspired by the question “What is the cheapest way to damage myself and trigger the effects of the Fade Away feat?” I am now wondering whether you can drink a flagon of poisoned ale as an object interaction.

The list of things you can do with your object interaction includes:

  • drink all the ale in a flagon

There are also poisons which activate when ingested such as the Assassin’s Blood (Ingested) Poison which states:

A creature subjected to this poison must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, it takes 6 (1d12) poison damage and is poisoned for 24 hours. On a successful save, the creature takes half damage and isn’t poisoned.

The section on ingested poisons states:

A creature must swallow an entire dose of ingested poison to suffer its effects. The dose can be delivered in food or a liquid. You may decide that a partial dose has a reduced effect, such as allowing advantage on the saving throw or dealing only half damage on a failed save.

I am wondering if there are rules that I’ve missed somewhere detailing poisoning things like this. Are there rules that clarify further whether you can drink poisoned ale as an object interaction, thus dealing damage to yourself?


Two reasons you may want to do this:
To damage yourself in order to activate the Fade Away feat.
To damage yourself in order to prevent Barbarian Rage from ending.