RTL8812au Driver was idle all night, died this morning

New upgrade from 16.04 to 18.04. The 16.04 is a new DVD install too. After install, decided to upgrade to 18.04. Quad core ASUS + AMD tower computer. 8GB RAM. Newer 1TB HDD.

Downloaded the 8812au drivers yesterday using my RaLink wifi adapter which worked fine as soon as plugged into a USB port, installed it, connected the Realtek USB adapter (RT) and it worked all day. Even worked in tandem with the RaLink adapter. Downloaded and installed my favorite apps and programs. Everything went well.

Then late in the day installed KiCAD CAD software, V4. Discovered an issue and upgraded to V5. Went to bed with it still downloading.

This morning, discovered that the RT wifi adapter wasn’t shown and wasn’t connected. Checked Network Connections and it showed that it had been connected 11 minutes prior. Rebooted. Network manager still did not show the adapter.

Reinstalled the drivers…that went well no errors. Still not shown in Network manager. Rebooted. Still not shown.

Moved the adapter over to my Win7 machine. Hardware discovered, drivers installed, got online. Moved adapter back to Ubuntu machine, not discovered. Tried different USB ports, not discovered. Plugged the RaLink adapter into the same USB port, online in seconds.

Any advice???

dkms status rtl8812au, 4.3.14, 4.15.0-52-generic, x86_64: installed (WARNING! Diff between built and installed module!) rtl8812au, 4.3.8.12175.20140902+dfsg, 4.15.0-51-generic, x86_64: installed rtl8812au, 4.3.8.12175.20140902+dfsg, 4.15.0-52-generic, x86_64: built 

Alternative driver for Intel Wireless-AC 3165 to allow mac spoofing

Intel has stopped supporting mac spoofing in their wifi drivers. Are there any open source drivers that allow mac spoofing on Intel Wireless-AC 3165?

Ubuntu 18.04.1 description: Wireless interface        product: Wireless 3165        vendor: Intel Corporation        physical id: 0        bus info: pci@0000:05:00.0        logical name: wlp5s0        version: 79        serial: 08:d4:0c:73:21:3e        width: 64 bits        clock: 33MHz        capabilities: pm msi pciexpress bus_master cap_list ethernet physical wireless        configuration: broadcast=yes driver=iwlwifi driverversion=4.18.0-21-generic firmware=29.1044073957.0 ip=192.168.44.244 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11 

I can install Nvidia driver v340 but not v430. However, my GPU supports v430. Help please?

Note: 1) I’ve alrdy ran the command “sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/ppa”. 2) I’ve alrdy selected Nvidia GPU using prime-select (CLI) / prime profile (GUI). 3) I tried with v418 and end up with the same result as v430. 4) Running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. 5) I’ve tried rebooting almost after every steps too.

I’ve been trying to install Nvidia driver version 430, however, when I run the command “nvidia-smi”, the output will always tell me that the driver NVIDIA-SMI has failed because it couldn’t communicate with the NVIDIA driver. Make sure that the latest NVIDIA driver is installed and running.

Running nvidia-smi on v340 will not have the same output above. Instead, the proper gpu related output table will show up.

Additional Notes: My computer is running GPU Nvidia Geforce 820M which supports 430. However, in Software & Updates, only nouveau and Nvidia v340 is listed. I’ve checked in Nvidia’s website and my GPU supports v430. Screenshot: Additional Driver in Software & Updates

Exception in thread “main” java.lang.IllegalStateException: The driver executable is a directory: C:\Users\Micky\OneDrive\Desktop\chromedriver.exe

Exception in thread “main” java.lang.IllegalStateException: The driver executable is a directory: C:\Users\Micky\OneDrive\Desktop\chromedriver.exe at com.google.common.base.Preconditions.checkState(Preconditions.java:585) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService.checkExecutable(DriverService.java:148) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService.findExecutable(DriverService.java:141) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService.access$ 000(ChromeDriverService.java:35) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService$ Builder.findDefaultExecutable(ChromeDriverService.java:159) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService$ Builder.build(DriverService.java:355) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService.createDefaultService(ChromeDriverService.java:94) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriver.(ChromeDriver.java:123) at Demo.main(Demo.java:13)

Tried adding chromedriver as an environment variable, mapping it to its path. Checked that all required jars are present

import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver; import org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriver;

public class Demo {

public static void main(String[] args)  {     // TODO Auto-generated method stub      // cREATE DRIVER OBJECT FOR CHROME BROWSER     System.setProperty("webdriver.chrome.driver", "C:\Users\Micky\OneDrive\Desktop\chromedriver.exe");      WebDriver driver = new ChromeDriver();      driver.get("http://google.com");    } 

}

Expected – Google webpage should load. Actual – Exception in thread “main” java.lang.IllegalStateException: The driver executable is a directory: C:\Users\Micky\OneDrive\Desktop\chromedriver.exe at com.google.common.base.Preconditions.checkState(Preconditions.java:585) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService.checkExecutable(DriverService.java:148) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService.findExecutable(DriverService.java:141) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService.access$ 000(ChromeDriverService.java:35) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService$ Builder.findDefaultExecutable(ChromeDriverService.java:159) at org.openqa.selenium.remote.service.DriverService$ Builder.build(DriverService.java:355) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriverService.createDefaultService(ChromeDriverService.java:94) at org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriver.(ChromeDriver.java:123) at Demo.main(Demo.java:13)

Realtek RTL8822BU driver from arm to arm64 to run on RPi 3B+ (Kali)

I recently purchased a new wireless adapter for use with Kali Linux running on a Raspberry Pi 3B+.

The driver described within the specification was RTL8812. I assumed (you know what they say) that it would be RTL8812AU for which their is an ARM64 driver available to be installed on Kali.

However, much to my surprise after looking up the idProduct once I plugged it in, it is actually RTL8812BU (https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Realtek_RTL8812BU_USB_Module).

[    2.082339] systemd[1]: Detected architecture arm64. [    2.099491] systemd[1]: Set hostname to <kali>. [    2.159353] usb 1-1.1.2: new high-speed USB device number 4 using dwc_otg [    2.249231] usb 1-1.1.2: New USB device found, idVendor=0bda, idProduct=b812, bcdDevice= 2.10 [    2.251726] usb 1-1.1.2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3 [    2.254302] usb 1-1.1.2: Product: USB3.0 802.11ac 1200M Adapter [    2.254309] usb 1-1.1.2: Manufacturer: Realtek [    2.254318] usb 1-1.1.2: SerialNumber: 123456  Machine: Linux kali 4.19.29-Re4son-v8+ #6 SMP PREEMPT Wed Mar 27 00:15:50 UTC 2019 aarch64 GNU/Linux 

From my research. There is a driver that supports RTL8812BU which is RTL8822BU (https://github.com/EntropicEffect/rtl8822bu)

This driver supports arm, but not arm64 which is what I require.

There is also a driver for RTL8812AU that supports ARM64 for RPi (https://github.com/diederikdehaas/rtl8812AU).

I have tried to combine both drivers in a number of ways, but I imagine the underlying .c files used within the drivers may need to be changed in some way. There are a lot of files and I have plenty of curiosity and not enough experience.

Can someone with wireless driver experience please try and point me in the right direction?

Would it make most sense to take the necessary pieces for RTL8822BU and build them into the RTL8812AU driver that already supports ARM64 for RPi?

Or should I attempt to port the RTL8822BU driver to support ARM64?

I am hopefully using the correct terminology.

I have very basic coding abilities, so even just telling me not to waste my time would be much appreciated! Thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

Ubuntu very slow boot after chaning driver (Nvdia)

I previously used X.Org driver for my Ubuntu desktop, and my graphic card is Nvdia GTX 1070, actually I’ve never been satisfied with my boot time because I use an high-end SSD and the boot time always takes more than 20 s (comparing to my Ubuntu laptop which is Radeon graphics and the same SSD, only takes 9 s).

However, recently I met some problem with compatibility issue of RStudio (always crashed) and I had to change to Nvdia driver as it was described here. So the Rstudio no longer crashes, however I face a very slow boot, after entering the grub (I have dual-boot), it freezes about 30s, and then the PC has a very transient beep (shorter than the boot one), and then I had to wait another 30 s until I can enter the login.

Does any one know how to solve this issue?

Install mouse and keyboard driver manually on external windows HDD

I install Windows on external HDD. When I boot to Windows for the first time mouse and keyboard not recognize. I know I should plug an external keyboard for that. and then install Bootcamp Windows Support Software. But my problem is I have one USB-C to USB converter. that one is used for the external Windows HDD. Is there any way to manually install(copy and paste) keyboard driver from Bootcamp Windows Support Software folder to Windows driver folder? If it possible I can copy and paste driver in its folders on windows and then boot again to windows HDD.

How to hack the printer driver to measure ink used for each print job?

Problem:

I have done a bit of research and noticed a lack of this feature in the official software by the major inkjet printer manufacturers to measure and record the amount of ink used in each print job.

This is useful for home users and critical for commercial users to find out the true cost for each print job.

I found one by Epson(official software).

Software: https://www.epson.eu/lfp-ink-cost-calculator-app

Review of the software: https://imagingspectrum.com/blog/2016/07/track-the-cost-of-print-jobs-on-epson-p-series-printers/

However, it is closed proprietary software and device dependent, Ie, only meant for Epson printer.

For printer companies are widely known for their excessive ink profiteering, it is very hard to imagine that they would open their platform(API) for third-party developers.

In the spirit of the maker movement, I would like to gather more information around this area and hopefully hack out a solution for any chosen printer.

Ideal Solution:

1) Before Printing: To anticipate the amount of ink to be used for the print job.

2) After Printing: To record the actual ink used for the print job.

3) The amount of ink used/to-be-used to be listed by their colors(refer to screenshot in the review link).

Implementation Options:

a) Hacking the printhead driver.

This method mainly revolves around messing with the software(driver). It also takes a lot of time in codes digging and writing the hack. But to do it at the driver level, it could potentially accomplish all #1, #2 and #3. However, this method may not be even possible as drivers for non-Epson printers may not be addressing ink usage at the get-go.

b) Adopt an ink tank system and attach a “valve meter” on the tube connected to each ink cartridge.

This method is more of a hardware/electronics implementation. It may involve a microcontroller/sensors at the “valve meter” level to monitor ink flow and record ink drawn from the tank. Data will be saved, manipulated and displayed on an external dashboard in whatever way we want it. It seems like a neater solution in theory. However, it wouldn’t be able to accomplish #1 (which is not a bad trade-off). But this creates a one-off solution that is device independent, Ie, virtually works on any printer with ink tank system. Huge plus!

If you have any suggestions and/or know-how, I would be delighted to hear from you and love to see this project through.