Bios stopped recognizing any drives after trying to install Ubuntu from usb drive

I tried installing Ubuntu (dual-boot with Windows 10) from my USB drive but I got the error “No EFI system partition was found, the system will likely not be able to boot successfully and the installation may fail” I closed the installer and reboot my computer to find that none of my drives are being recognized by the bios. When I went back to Ubuntu on my USB (apparently it can recognize the USB and nothing else) all the drives were recognized and there was nothing wrong with them. I have no clue what could be going on here.

Epson XP-245 can’t found any drives and even don’t print

I just bought an Epson printer XP-245 I tried with the normal setup connecting wireless but it not printing or scanning. I searched too but nothing worked for me. My system is a hp laptop db1015na with Ryzen 5 3500U and running Ubuntu 10.04.03. I found a way round using the e-mail system and with my smartphone but I still like to print and scan without jumping hopes

Thanks in advance

Are my hard drives encrypted?

New to Ubuntu Server, please forgive my ignorance.

When I installed Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Alternative. I selected “Guided – use entire disk and set up encrypted LVM”.

I now am adding two hard drives with RAID 1 configuration. Will these be encrypted by default or will I have to use LVM to encrypt them?

If I need to encrypt them, does anyone know of a good guide. I’ve been searching all over the web but only see guides for old versions.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!

Can’t find HDD drives after extend partition of Ubuntu on SSD

I have a micro server, with one SSD and two HDDs. There are windows and Ubuntu on SSD. After the partition of Ubuntu is full, I tried to extend it. Using a live-usb Ubuntu system and GParted, I erase the Windows system and extend the partition of Ubuntu. After that, I manager to boot into Ubuntu but I can’t find my two HDD drives. I have tried sudo fdisk -l and lsblk, only /dev/sda is shown in the result. sda is my SSD driver. Then I reboot and enter into grub command line. I tried ls there, the result is as follows: grub_screenshot As you can see, there are three drivers: hd0,hd1 is my HDD, hd2 is my SSD. But after I enter into the Ubuntu system, I still can’t find hd0 and hd1. Any thoughts about what’s to do next? Thanks!

Can’t find HDD drives after extend partition of Ubuntu on SSD

I have a micro server, with one SSD and two HDDs. There are windows and Ubuntu on SSD. After the partition of Ubuntu is full, I tried to extend it. Using a live-usb Ubuntu system and GParted, I erase the Windows system and extend the partition of Ubuntu. After that, I manager to boot into Ubuntu but I can’t find my two HDD drives. I have tried sudo fdisk -l and lsblk, only /dev/sda is shown in the result. sda is my SSD driver. Then I reboot and enter into grub command line. I tried ls there, the result is as follows: grub_screenshot As you can see, there are three drivers: hd0,hd1 is my HDD, hd2 is my SSD. But after I enter into the Ubuntu system, I still can’t find hd0 and hd1. Any thoughts about what’s to do next? Thanks!

Are there tangible recommendations for USB drives to be disabled?

I am currently discussing / considering the possibility to disable access to USB drives (USB storage) on Windows machines.

There are technical means to do this and I am trying to balance arguments in the threat scenario.

PRO removal of USB drives

  • ability to bring in malware (no malicious intent from user)
  • ability to bring in malware (malicious intent from user)
  • ability to offload data
  • loss of unencrypted drive → potential loss of data

CON removal of USB drives

  • none (from the perspective of security)
  • plenty (from the business perspective: exchange of data with customers, offloading of large files)
  • the attack can come from BadUsb (this is not a real “CON”, rather the fact that USB drives do not cover the whole threat spectrum)

There are also counter-arguments for the PRO section:

  • the “ability” part is not limited to USB drives, the data/virus transfer can be done though virtual means (virtual disks, email, …)
  • the “not encrypted” problem can be solved by requesting that connected drives are forcefully encrypted

My question: are there tangible recommendations for USB drives to be disabled?

Tangible here means either “standards based” (common sense optional), or “common sense”.

Tool to objectively test performance various external drives on my Mac via USB & Thunderbolt

I would to test the relative performance of various external storage devices:

  • Thumb drive
    • Samsung MUF-256AB/AM FIT Plus 256GB – 300MB/s USB 3.1 Flash Drive (256 gigs)
  • Spinning metal drive
    • Toshiba Canvio Advance 1TB Portable External Hard Drive USB 3.0, Blue (HDTC910XL3AA)
  • NVMe M.2 solid-state storage adapter
    • EXMTE M.2 NVME USB 3.1 Adapter M-Key M.2 NGFF NVME to USB Card High Performance 10 Gbps USB 3.1 Gen 2 Bridge Chip
    • Samsung 970 EVO Plus Series – 250GB PCIe NVMe – M.2 Internal SSD (MZ-V7S250B/AM)

I do not care about free-of-cost or not, I’d be okay with paying a fee.

I understand benchmarking tools are always biased and unrealistic as compared to real-world usage. Nevertheless, I would like to get an objective sense of the reading and writing throughput on these devices. In particular I would like to see if the NMMe M.2 can saturate the USB 3.0 port on my MacBook and the USB 3.1 port on my Mac mini.

Testing on:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013)
  • Mac mini 2018

I found a couple similar Questions (here & here), but they are 7-8 years old. I imagine things may have changed, now in 2019.

Why do I have 2 drives with the same used space?

this is a weird one. I just bought a 2nd hand macbook retina and turns out that when I re-installed macOS, the storage dialog showed up a 2nd drive. The very first thought was that the main drive is a 500gb SSD and its partitioned in 2, so I went to disk utility and there where listed as two different drives. I didn’t get a picture of it, but continued with the process and now with a couple of days of using the MBP I can see the two drives have almost identical used space, like a mirror.

All apps and OS where installed in the very first of the list, “Macintosh HD”. But well Im going to leave you some screenshots so you can see better what’s going on.

Thank you a lot.

enter image description here

EDIT:

Those are my diskutil list results. Thanks!

enter image description here

Transferring Drives to New Server [on hold]

I have an ubuntu server that I built in 2008 from an old home computer. Over the years it has become many things for me, apache web server, plex media server, owncloud, as well as a place for me to experiment with cool new software. I installed a 6tb raid 5 array a few years ago when I created the PMS with mdadm and have had a great time maintaining it.

Recently I inherited a newer server built in 2016 with newer hardware, that will allow me to do a bit more with a server and handle more transcoding with PMS, all while being more efficient and quiet. This server also has an mdadm 16tb raid 5 array.

As much as I have enjoyed creating my old server over the years, I am not the most experienced at server set up and stumbled through a lot of it. I enjoyed doing it, but I am afraid it will taking me quite a while to get it back to the current set up. I rely on much of this software that runs on here so that would be hard for me!

Question: What would be the best way to transfer all of the old software and hardware to the new server? The newer server has plenty of room to transfer all the drives, so would it be possible to just transfer the drives over, change the boot drive to the newly installed SSD and immediately see the mdadm array from the old computer? Then run the mdadm -assemble -scan and voila, both arrays are there? or is this too simple? I am just trying to avoid rebuilding my old boot drive!