Can a sorcerer learn a 5th-level spell early by creating spell slots using the Font of Magic feature?

Per the Font of Magic feature, sorcerer can use Flexible Casting to create 5th-level spell slots at level 7, even though they are not typically available until level 9.

You can transform unexpended sorcery points into one spell slot as a bonus action on your turn. The Creating Spell Slots table shows the cost of creating a spell slot of [5th level is 7]

If such a sorcerer levels up while still having this 5th-level spell slot, can they choose a 5th-level spell as the spell they gain upon levelling up?

The Spellcasting feature states:

Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Trying to find an early D&D module that had a drider lair

I played this module about 25 years back and don’t remember much of it, but it did have these features:

There was a ‘trap’ consisting of a long chain that descended into a pool leading to an underwater tunnel, and eventually dead-ended stapled to a blank rock face, drowning the character who thought they could use the chain to pull themselves to air on the far side.

There was an empty drider lair above the main corridor than you had to climb up into. It was dusty and empty except for one 50gp gem.

There was a very long, steep, narrow, winding corridor going down at some point.

It was likely a module for player levels 1-4, and may have been for beginning DMs as well.

Given the drider and the corridor going down, I thought perhaps it was Descent into the Depths of the Earth, but that’s for too high a character level.

Anyone remember this?

Why metamagic feats for spell-like abilities that Warlocks use are so much stronger than regular metamagic feats at early levels?

Warlock is able to stack maximize and empower spell like abilities as early as level 6 without increasing effective caster level, which is not true for maximize/empower spell feat (for Sorcerers and Wizards)

Warlock is able to maximize and empower their magic items with that boost their eldritch blast such as gloves of eldritch admixture, which adds 4d6 to their total damage, but it doesn’t hold true for regular metamagic feats.

How come there is such a power gap between metamagic feats for spell vs spell like abilities?

How should I stat very powerful artifacts that the party acquires too early?

A few weeks ago I started DMing a campaign that involves five divine artifacts that all of the gods’ powers are filtered through. I planned on the paragon level quest being collecting these in order to either destroy or protect them. Unfortunately, one of my players rolled a natural 20 on Thievery to steal the chestplate artifact at Level 2 (next encounter will level them up). How should I handle the stats on this item?

What’s the term for a hash sent early and plain text revealed later?

I think there is a known pattern where you post the hash of a document, e.g. on Twitter, in order to have its time registered. You could then later publish the document and have it accredited for the time of the hash.

I’m sure someone gave this procedure a name. What is that name?

I found trusted timestamping, but that is a thing for digital certificates, which do not come into play here.

What factors led to the poor reception and early cancellation of Wraith: The Oblivion?

Wraith: The Oblivion was published by White Wolf Games in 1994, but cancelled in 1999. Many of the books during the run show signs of being compressed together. While White Wolf typically published one book for each clan, bloodline, creed, etc., for Wraith two guilds were often smashed into one book. Wikipedia says that more books were planned, but never published.

Why was Wraith cancelled early? Wikipedia also mentions it was nominated for some awards, and it seems like a fairly novel game in some regards. It has a unique character that really sets it apart. I haven’t played it, but reading the books doesn’t reveal anything telling – it seems to use the same system as other White Wolf games with some reskinning.

Things I’ve tried:

  • I’ve tried asking the proprieters of my local game stores. They either don’t know anything, or remember that it sold poorly with no real explanation.
  • I’ve asked around my local World of Darkness tables. Many of the oldbies were playing in the 1990’s, but none admit to having played the game. Their responses mostly came down to "everyone knows this game sucks", with no explanation of why.
  • White Wolf advertised some listservs in its game books, but I haven’t been able to find archives of them.
  • I’ve read some reviews of Wraith. Most of them are rather artistic or critical in nature, rather than something that I suspect reflects the real played experience of actual tables. Additionally, none of them describe the game’s failure or why it was cancelled.

So what happened? Why was Wraith cancelled?

Looking for a late 80’s possibly early 90’s D&D adventure based around a bar room brawl

About 20-25 or so years ago our group played a D&D one shot adventure that was entirely based around a bar room brawl. It started out with us in the inn post adventure and then developed over time into a full on brawl, there where a number of events and actions that happened during the night and a large number of NPC’s we could interact with through the adventure.

I know our GM based it on a written adventure potentially published in the late 80’s, think it might have been published in a roleplay or specific D&D magazine, possibly a very early White Dwarf.

The sessions stands out even now as being really good fun and I have been trying to find it in order to run a similar session myself, does anyone know this, or a similair adventure?

How do I reveal the Big Bad only by foreshadowing, without the reveal being too early or late?

What I plan for my campaign is to drop hints about some greater evil, and whenever my players reach the natural point of realization, have them go off on a search to stop it. I wanna do it naturally, so I don’t have a point in mind where I have a big reveal, I want to players to create it, in a manner of speaking.

How do I foreshadow the Big Bad (without leaving too large a trail of clues so that they realize it too soon after the campaign starts) so there’s not that same anticipation, but not so vague that they get frustrated?

Can a project with 1 turn left be “finished early”?

There are a couple of times that a game of The Quiet Year will require that you complete a task early. This causes the completion to occur this turn, narrated by the player whose turn it is.

The question is whether this can be used on a project that has one turn left (and will be finished this turn).

This is not really completing the project early, since it is completed on the same week it would be, but it does matter mechanically since it determines who narrates its completion.

Can a project be “completed early” if a card asks for it, without actually being completed any sooner than it would have?

How to handle character death early on during the session? [closed]

I don’t usually like to kill my player’s characters, but as we all know, sometimes is necessary for many reasons. My question is, if a player character dies when the night is just starting (in real life), how do you manage for the player to still play if he has no other character prepared?

Have in mind:

  • My players are very new, so they can’t make characters without my help and I can’t be helping them and GMing at the same time.
  • None of them have secondary characters ready to go.