Old Edition Google News Approved Site and it is also approved in Flipboard, News360.com, Apple News.

Today I’m going to list a “Google News Approved Website” (Old Edition) for sale.

What is Google News?

I’m sure that you have seen results from Google News when performing searches in Google. Actually, Google shows results from its different indexes (from videos to images) for users’ queries. One of these indexes is Google News. By having a Google News-listed website, you will have a chance for getting ranked on the first page of SERPs. That’s not all, you will be even ranked first…

Old Edition Google News Approved Site and it is also approved in Flipboard, News360.com, Apple News.

How do I recalibrate this encounter from Red Hand of Doom for 5th Edition D&D?

I’m running D&D3.5e’s Red Hand of Doom updated for 5e. So far it has been effortlessly straightforward. I’ve been keeping the basic combat encounter structures and simply swapping out 3.5e monsters for similarly-named 5e monsters (3.5e hobgoblins for 5e hobgoblins, 3.5e manticores for 5e manticores, etc.). Likewise, I’ve been winging skill checks and other non-combat challenges just by eyeballing how hard the stated 3.5e DCs likely would’ve been and using my best judgment to apply 5e DCs of roughly similar probability given bounded accuracy.

However, the PCs are coming up on a critical encounter with a major non-combat objective that presents special conversion problems. The encounter in question, arising near the end of Part I, is

Because this objective isn’t a monster, I can’t simply turn to stock 5e monsters and assume all the calibration will have been done for me. At the same time, it’s not as simple as a skill check that I can just eyeball. RHoD provides 3.5e combat statistics for the objective (see p. 34-35), but I’m not sure how those statistics translate to 5e. As written, the objective has what I perceive to be an outsize pile of HP, plus additional defensive features (taking reduced damage from certain sources, etc.) arising from how 3.5e treated entities in the nature of this objective. It’s not clear whether, or how, 5e might expect me to recalibrate those statistics and features.

That is problem enough, but RHoD also goes out of its way to enumerate 3.5e spells that can interact effectively with the objective — most of which are either unavailable or fundamentally changed in 5e. To wit:

  • Soften earth and stone does not exist in 5e.
  • 5e’s version of stone shape restricts the effected area to "no more than 5 feet in any direction," which was not a limitation of the 3.5e version.
  • Stone to flesh does not exist in 5e.
  • Transmute rock does exist in 5e and is substantially more useful in that it applies to any nonmagical rock, rather than only natural, unworked rock as did the 3.5e version. The 5e version could probably deal with the objective in a single turn, whereas RHoD says the 3.5e version just dealt some modest damage if used in a particular way.

Given the different combat mechanics and spell functions between 3.5e and 5e, how do I convert this encounter so it remains an appropriate challenge?

(In case context is helpful, the party is level 5 and comprises a Light cleric, a Hunter ranger, a melee-heavy Battlemaster fighter, and an Abjuration wizard. Despite RHoD being written for 3.5e parties starting at level 6, up to this point these 5th-level PCs have been able to handle the encounters in Part I of the adventure.)

A new ki idea for increasing monk damage 5th edition

Is this idea for a Ki option for a monk starting at 2nd level balanced? Based on playing experience, are there any foreseeable problems with it?

Iron Palm

Immediately before you take the attack action on your turn, you can spend 1 ki point to increase your unarmed strike damage dice to the next rank. This lasts until the end of your turn, and does not effect hand held weapons or other monk weapons only the unarmed strikes.

If a description in D&D 5e is lacking, is it valid to refer to an older edition?

In 5e, Tenser’s Floating Disc

follows you so that it stays within 20’ of you.
(5e PHB282)

The spell description does not make mention of its travel rate, but in 3.5e the description says:

It floats along horizontally within spell range and will accompany you at a rate of no more than your normal speed each round. (3.5e PHB294)

Could the lack of follow speed in 5e be extrapolated from the description in 3.5e?

SQL Server Transactional Replication between SQL server 2019 Standard and SQL server 2016 Web Edition

We have SQL Server 2016 Web Edition on production currently. Since this edition supports replication as Subscriber only, I set up a new server with SQL Server 2019 Standard edition. I want to configure SQL Server 2019 as Publisher and SQL Server 2016 as subscriber. To initialize data for Publisher database on SQL server 2019, I created a backup on SQL Server 2016 and restored it on SQL Server 2019. Since our database is very large, I tried to initialize replication from a backup. So I did reverse backup-restore again by creating a backup of Publisher on SQL Server 2019 and restoring it on Subscriber on SQL Server 2016. But this did not work because [SQL Server 2019 backups cannot be restored by any earlier version of SQL Server] (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/databases/copy-databases-with-backup-and-restore?view=sql-server-ver15). Could you please tell me what is the best method for initializing the replication in this case? Thank you very much for reading my question!

Given the following constraints what is the maximum number of attacks in a round for 3.X edition?

A former DM has had the same recurring NPC/GMPC since I started playing in his game. This was 20+ years ago and we started in 1st edition and slowly made our way through the years and editions. We updated our characters as we went to the new editions. Now this NPC/GMPC is the most reviled in his games, any time he shows up all the players immediately want him dead. We stick to character though.

The question will be broken up to hopefully get expert answers from each of the editions in which we played in this particular question it will be specific to 3.Xe. I am skipping 4e (as we all hated it and only played one session) and 5e because I know for a fact that it is not possible there (yet).

The question is as follows:

Give the following constraints what is the maximum number of attacks in this edition:

  1. NPC is an Elf (In this edition it is irrelavent I suppose).
  2. He was a Thief-Acrobat in previous editions and I assume multiclassed, probably Fighter-Thief, due to how 3.X prestige works let’s assume just Rogue for this edition, although any official prestige class is fair game. Character focused on tumbling and thrown knife attacks.
  3. The weapon of choice was throwing knives.
  4. Assume unlimited ammunition as he had a bandalier that had the knives return.
  5. I know he could throw 3 knives at a time (pretty sure this was a thing for shuriken from Oriental Adventures).
  6. Assume all official sources and Dragon Magazine since the first issue are open.
  7. I know of this question and assume there is a variant with knives.
  8. If I recall he threw with both hands as well.
  9. Assume prestige classes are open, this DM even as a player had a tendency to stack multiclass options with min/max precision but assume Rogue is the primary focus.
  10. Assume Quick Draw.
  11. We were always between 8th and 15th level when I met this character.
  12. I do not recall spell-casting but not ruling it out entirely but main build would likely have been focused on mundane means.
  13. Assume focused magical item augmentation as well, just calling it out even though the aforementioned bandolier alluded to it, but for the most part official items other than that.
  14. Assume no flying invisible helpers as suggested by HeyICanChan or for that matter third party interventions or Aid Another.

The end result in game was quite literally at least 2 dozen attacks per round, perhaps more. Which I have questioned him multiple times about the build and legitimacy but he as refused to provide any answers. I know DMs do not have to justify but this, combined with a number of other things over the years has lead to distrust. I have since stopped playing his games altogether, so this is just a verification on whether I have overreacted.

This was broken into 3 questions for each of the editions.

AD&D, AD&D 2nd Edition, and Dungeons & Dragons 3.X.

Why brass knuckles do 0 additional damage in Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition?

I’ve been creating a character and thought that it was cool for her to have brass knuckles to fight, but then I’ve seen that in the Core book (pg. 180) says that brass knuckles deal 0 damage (appart from the damage that you deal with raw brawl. In the Chronicles of Darkness 2nd Edition core book says the same.

Is this an errata, or there’s something I’m missing?

D&D 5th Edition: Truesight and Darkvision, Why Does A Monster Have Both?

While creating a homebrew monster based around eyes and vision, I looked up monsters that had both darkvison and truesight, surprisingly only two have both, the Avatar of Death and Canoloth, I’ll use the Canoloth as the example here.

When reading the descriptions of both vision types, darkvision allows a creature to see in dim light as if it were bright light and darkness as if it were dim light but it can’t discern color and only sees shades of grey, with truesight not only can you see in normal darkness but also magical darkness, as well as many other benefits, so what confuses me is why any creature would have both forms of vision (especially when it only has darkvision out to 60 feet but truesight out to 120 feet) when truesight already has the only benefit of darkvision along with all its other benefits?

Have I misinterpreted the mechanics of these different sight types, is their a hidden reason behind having both? Or is it just a slipup of the designers to give a creature like the Canoloth both forms of vision?

What is the status of the nation of Chondath in the Forgotten Realms of 5th Edition D&D?

The 4th Edition Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide indicates that Chondath was among the lands "most changed by the Spellplague" (p. 50), inasmuch as the entire nation was "obliterated" (p. 100) in the violent merging of Abeir with Toril. "[T]he strip of land formerly called Chondath" was either subsumed into the Abeiran realm of Akanûl (p. 86) — now littered with "[t]he shattered ruins of Chondathan cities" (p. 90) — or else became part of a frontier called the Vilhon Wilds (p. 193).

All of that happened in the late 14th century DR, with 4th Edition officially starting in 1479 DR (see FRCG p. 40).

Starting in the 1480s, the Second Sundering separated Abeir and Toril once more, and 5th Edition is set circa 1489 DR.

Popular opinion seems to hold (not without evidence, granted) that 5e was intended to roll back some of 4E’s more drastic lore changes, leaving the state of the world roughly compatible with pre-4E lore. However, even with Akanûl returned to Abeir, the ten-year stretch between 1479 and 1489 seems awfully short for Chondath to have been rebuilt from blasted ruins into the functioning nation it was before 4E.

Mysteriously, the Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide mentions various other nations around the Sea of Fallen Stars, such as Aglarond, Chessenta, Impiltur, and Thesk, (see p. 11-13), yet there is no mention of Chondath.

Is there any available information on the state of Chondath as of 1489?