What planes have time warping effects?

In the 5e DMG travel to the Feywild is accompanied by a time warping effect, which is determined by rolling on a random table.

My wizard (semi-inspired by an ancient ball of fun from Critical Role) is looking at making a planar home for himself to take advantage of this kind of effect.

I haven’t found anything in 5e, so suspect I will be looking for rules from earlier editions: what planes have stable (ie: not rolled on a random table) time warping effects?

Specifically I am looking for a plane on which I can spend a long time, then step back into the material plane where a shorter time will have passed, even more specifically I am looking for one without negative side effects! Yes this is a classic ‘how can my wizard extend their life’ question.

So far everything I have found either has a side effect, is randomly rolled, or is the far realm (according to the 3.5 manual of the planes, and even that isn’t clear about no negative effects upon returning, but might have to do for my purposes).

Are Heightened effects of spells optional?

Most Heighten effects are purely beneficial, but some significantly alter the effect of a spell. There is an edge case where you may want to use a high level spell slot but get the effect unaltered. The most obvious instance of this, to me, is Invisibility

Duration 10 minutes
Cloaked in illusion, the target becomes invisible. This makes it undetected to all creatures, though the creatures can attempt to find the target, making it hidden to them instead. If the target uses a hostile action, the spell ends after that hostile action is completed.
Heightened (4th) The spell lasts 1 minute, but it doesn’t end if the target uses a hostile action.

A hypothetical, to illustrate, would be attempting to bypass a Dispel trap or otherwise expecting the Invisibility to be Counteracted while still wanting the 10 minute duration. Could I cast Invisibility using a 4th+ spell slot and still maintain the normal Duration and benefits/limitation of the spell?

Are creature environmental effects a bubble or column?

I am planning out my campaigns first BBE and am going with an aboleth.

In the rules an aboleth has a number of regional effects that reach up to a mile. This aboleth is currently in an underground pool in a mine about a mile underground. So would the characters see any evidence of the aboleth effects at ground level away from the mine, or would the effects only exist in a bubble the top of which is level with the top of the mine?

To my mind the effects will be a bubble, so widening out from the aboleth, if the approached underground they would meet them far sooner?

How exactly does Burn It! (and similar effects) affect splash and ongoing damage?

The level 1 goblin feat Burn It! gives a status damage bonus to all spells and alchemical items that deal fire damage. It also gives a status damage bonus of +1 to all ongoing fire effects. How does that work with splash damage?

For example, suppose I’m a low-level goblin with the Burn It! feat, who really, really likes fire, and who has just come into a bit of money. I decide to blow it on an alchemist’s Fire (Greater). It’s got +2 to hit, and deals 3d8 fire damage, 3 persistent fire damage, and 3 fire splash damage. It’s level 11, and Burn It! gives a bonus of a quarter of that (min 1) to base and splash damage. I spot two people I don’t like standing next to each other, pitch it at one of them, and hit. Now, without the feat, it’s pretty simple. The guy I hit takes 3d8+3 (base plus splash) and 3 ongoing. The guy next to him just takes 3 splash. With the feat… what happens? Does it affect the splash damage at all? If it does affect the splash damage, do I get the bonus twice on the main guy because I hit him with both base and splash? Does the ongoing damage get just +1 (for being ongoing fire damage) or the full bonus (for being fire damage from an alchemical device)? How is the actual bonus determined (given that the level is not evenly divisible by 4)?

there is a question that covers part of this from the playtest, but it appears that at least some of the rules text has changed since it was written, and it doesn’t cover the full thing.

Why do elves suffer aging effects in 3.5E?

D&D 3.5 rules specify the effects of aging when reaching middle, old, and venerable age. These effects are the same for all races, with only the age at which they’re reached changing. Forgotten Realms lore states that elves age gracefully and remain full of life until near death. So why should they get the same penalties of age that humans get? Has this ever been addressed?

How are clockwork prosthetics and necrografts affected by effects that cause magic items to stop working?

Clockwork prosthetics and necrograft arms and legs are the rare examples of magic items to fully replace humanoid limbs, and unless they have a special ruleset on the matter they are as susceptible to antimagic fields or disjunction spells as any other magic item.

For any other magic item, it’s easy to predict what happens when they get affected by an effect that suppresses their magic : magic weapons revert to mundane masterwork weapons and other magic items stop having any effect and are totally useless. However, there are no rules about losing limbs except for some rules added by 3rd party publishers (that I tend to avoid except for a few rare exceptions) or I probably missed them, and the rules on prosthetics don’t explain what happens either.

If a magic prosthesis gets its magic suppressed does it :

  • totally stop working altogether and become inert (and apart from obvious penalties like not being able to wield weapons, how does it affect the wearer ?) ?

  • stop giving its specific benefit and still do its job as a limb replacement, imposing no additional penalty to the wearer ?

Do Continuous effects in an array remain after you switch to a different power?

Note: This is different to What happens when you use a continuous power in an array and then switch to a different power? as that covers 2nd edition, and I’m focused on 3rd.

Say you have an array with two powers: one is a Create effect with Increased Duration (Continuous) extra, the other is an attack of some kind. You use the former to create a box, and then switch to the other. Does the box remain, or does it vanish?

The rules are ambiguous on this point, and there is a strong argument for either position from both a rules and a thematic perspective

The description for Alternate Effect states:

Alternate Effects cannot be used or maintained at the same time as other Alternates in the same array; they are mutually exclusive

The description for the Continuous duration states:

The effect lasts as long as you wish, without any action required on your part. Once active, it stays that way until you choose to deactivate it

From a rules perspective, one could argue that since one is not maintaining the effect, one would be permitted to swap between powers without dismissing the effect. On the other hand, one could argue that the effect being in place at all counts as the power being ‘used’.

From a thematic perspective, one could argue for effects remaining with the following example: Imagine a superhero, let’s call her Sue. Sue has the power to fire Ice Beams, with two applications: as an attack, or to build ice constructs. Since both rely on her firing Ice Beams, and she can only use the beams for one at a time, it makes sense that they would be an array. In addition, once her constructs are created, she doesn’t need to sustain them (ignoring ice melting for this example). As such, it would make sense for the constructs to be Continuous. If she were to build a construct one round, then attack with her beams the next, it would make little sense for the construct to suddenly disappear, as they were not reliant on her in any way. However, one could argue that the two effects being able to be applicable at the same time violates the concept of an array.

I’ve checked the forums, and there is a solid 3 pages of discussion there with no consensus, so I’m looking for an official ruling on this if there is one at all. Thanks in advance.

Whats the damage of a colossal non-magical longbow under the effects of shrink item and a medium arrow?

What is the damage of a Colossal non-magical longbow when under the effects of shrink item spell?

Now, your standard medium longbow does 1d8 and weights 3 pounds. Scaling it up 4 size categories means its now does 6d6 according to the damage dice progression chart and should weigh 3x8x8x8x8=12,288 (the x8 is per category larger than medium, and calculated using enlarge person, reduce person, and righteous might). 12k pounds. Under the weapon rules, a large weapon costs 2x as much as a medium weapon, so said colossal longbow should cost 75x2x2x2x2=1200 (found on the weapons page and scrolling down to weapon qualities).

It is also worth mentioning that this weapon MIGHT also have a -8 on attacks roles due to the weapon being sized for a larger creature. Found on the weapons page by scrolling down to Weapon Size.

Inappropriately Sized Weapons: A creature can’t make optimum use of a weapon that isn’t properly sized for it. A cumulative –2 penalty applies on attack rolls for each size category of difference between the size of its intended wielder and the size of its actual wielder. If the creature isn’t proficient with the weapon, a –4 nonproficiency penalty also applies.

Now having shrink spell cast on this colossal longbow now makes it back into a medium sized weapon and weighs 12,288 / 4000 = 3.072. Since shrink spell makes no statements about what damage the weapon would do, we are forced to rely on spells such as enlarge person and reduce person, of which they do not agree on this topic.

Enlarge person

Any enlarged item that leaves an enlarged creature’s possession (including a projectile or thrown weapon) instantly returns to its normal size. This means that thrown and projectile weapons deal their normal damage. Magical properties of enlarged items are not increased by this spell.

Reduce person

Any reduced item that leaves the reduced creature’s possession (including a projectile or thrown weapon) instantly returns to its normal size. This means that thrown weapons deal their normal damage (projectiles deal damage based on the size of the weapon that fired them).

So on one hand, reduce states its the weapon that matters, while enlarge says it does normal damage. So the best examples we have contradict each other for what happens. Since shrink item is more in tune with reduce person as both deal with shrinking, this would imply that a shrink item(colossal longbow) firing a medium arrow should deal 6d6 damage. Are there any rules, errata, FAQs that say otherwise? Crying DMs/GMs do not count.

There are two similar questions, but they ask different things. Shrink Item and the Oversized Starknife is asking about a thrown weapon. How viable is shrink item and massive projectiles? is asking about the projectile and not the launching weapon.

Can you escape a grapple during a time stop (without teleporting or similar effects)?

Some context: during our last game a hidden creature charged and grappled (with improved grab) one of the PCs (a 20th-level Sha-ir/Cleric/Dweomerkeeper) during the surprise round. After that this same PC won initiative and the first thing he did was casting time stop. We decided to stop the game there for several reasons, it was already time, one other player had already left and this was an important encounter he didn’t want to miss, and I wasn’t really sure how to rule this situation yet.

So regarding the question itself, say you’re in a grapple with another creature, and during your turn you cast time stop (since it only has verbal components you can cast it while grappling with a DC 29 Concentration check), but you’re inside the area of a forbiddance spell, so you can’t just teleport out.

Could you escape the grapple while time is stopped using the normal method (by making a grapple or escapism check)? I’m guessing that since the opponent can’t move or be moved he can’t make a grapple check either so you can’t even try the opposed check.

Would casting freedom of movement be of any help at all? You automatically succeed on the grapple check to free yourself, but I don’t think you can make that check to begin with.

What other methods could you use to escape before the time stop ends?

Can a 4th level or higher Dispel Magic dispel the effects of a Duration: Instantaneous spell?

When cast at 3rd level, dispel magic ends a spell that is currently effecting the target:

Choose one creature, object, or magical effect within range. Any spell of 3rd level or lower on the target ends. For each spell of 4th level or higher on the target, make an ability check using your spellcasting ability. The DC equals 10 + the spell’s level. On a successful check, the spell ends.

Notably, this does not work on effects from spells with instantaneous duration, as those spells have already ended.

But when cast at 4th level or higher, it appears as though it should end spell effects from spells having Instantaneous duration:

When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 4th level or higher, you automatically end the effects of a spell on the target if the spell’s level is equal to or less than the level of the spell slot you used.

Is this the correct ruling? Does a 4th level dispel magic end spell effects from instantaneous duration spells?