Do Abjure Enemy effects last only one turn?

I play the Oath of Vengeance paladin and have came across a problem.

There is the Channel Divinity: Abjure Enemy description, which states:

As an action, you present your holy symbol and speak a prayer of denunciation, using your Channel Divinity. Choose one creature within 60 feet of you that you can see. That creature must make a Wisdom saving throw, unless it is immune to being frightened. Fiends and undead have disadvantage on this saving throw.

On a failed save, the creature is frightened for 1 minute or until it takes any damage. While frightened, the creature’s speed is 0, and it can’t benefit from any bonus to its speed.

On a successful save, the creature’s speed is halved for 1 minute or until the creature takes any damage.

It sounds pretty good, but does anything forbid an abjured enemy from simply harming himself on his turn?

Can you (continue to) concentrate on a spell that never had any of its effects take hold?

I have previously asked the following question:

  • Is there any reason to concentrate on the Thunderous Smite spell after using its effects?

And my current question is inspired by that and the following recent question:

  • If I want to affect a creature with a concentration spell and it succeeds its save, do I notice my concentration failing?

I realize that in my previous question I just assumed that you could continue to concentrate on the thunderous smite spell after using its effects, but nobody contested this assumption in the answers, so now I’m asking about a similar, but somewhat different case.

I now ask whether you can (continue to) concentrate on a spell where all of its immediate effects never actually occur. An example of such a spell is bane which has a duration of Concentration 1 Minute and states:

Up to three creatures of your choice that you can see within range must make Charisma saving throws. Whenever a target that fails this saving throw makes an attack roll or a saving throw before the spell ends, the target must roll a d4 and subtract the number rolled from the attack roll or saving throw […]

But what happens if none of the targets fail their saving throw? Can you continue to concentrate on the spell even in this case?

How does Nilbogism interact with features that have a random table of effects?

The Nilbog at page 182 in Volo’s Guide to Monsters has the following feature:

Nilbogism. Any creature that attempts to damage the nilbog must first succeed on a DC 12 Charisma saving throw or be charmed until the end of the creature’s next turn. A creature charmed in this way must use its action praising the nilbog. The nilbog can’t regain hit points, including through magical healing, except through its Reversal of Fortune reaction.

So if anyone would use the a Wand of Wonder, even the nilbog himself, would they have to make a Charisma Save before using it if there is a slim chance they could harm the nilbog?

If the nilbog would use it, there are a lot which could happen to him: stunned on a 11-15, potential 1d6 psychic damage on a 21-25, potentially standing in a fireball 70-79, blinded on a 91-95, petrified on a 98-00.

scrying with effects with a range of sight

If you cast scrying to see a creature, and assuming you can target them with spells that have a range of sight (as discussed here), what spells and abilities could you use to affect that creature or something around that character?

This is assuming that concentration/casting time can be avoided in some way. So far spells with a range of sight are:

  • Mirage Arcane
  • Skywrite
  • Tsunami
  • Storm of Vengeance

You could augment your sight through the sensor with:

  • True Seeing
  • Darkvision
  • See Invisibility

The goal of this question is, a list of possible effects that would be applicable to the aforementioned scrying situation.

In 5e, are there two versions of a ‘shove’, and if so, what further effects do the different versions possibly allow?

As I see it there are two versions of ‘shoving’ in 5e: a physical verion and a magical version.

The physical version allows pushing an opponent backwards OR knocking them prone, while the magic version moves them towards you or away from you but does not mention possibly knocking them prone.

The physical version is described on p. 195 (PHB) as follows,

"Using the Attack action, you can make a Special melee Attack to shove a creature, either to knock it prone or push it away from you. If you’re able to make multiple attacks with the Attack action, this Attack replaces one of them. The target must be no more than one size larger than you and must be within your reach. Instead of Making an Attack roll, you make a Strength (Athletics) check contested by the target’s Strength (Athletics) or Dexterity (Acrobatics) check (the target chooses the ability to use). If you win the contest, you either knock the target prone or push it 5 feet away from you."

The Shield Master feat (p.170 of PHB) allows for this physical version as well.

The Telekinetic feat in Tashas C. of E. (p.81) is described this way,

"As a bonus action, you can try to telekinetically shove one creature you can see within 30 feet of you. When you do so, the target must succeed on a Strength saving throw (DC 8 + your proficiency bonus + the ability modifier of the score increased by this feat) or be moved 5 feet toward or away from you. A creature can willingly fail this save.

Certain spells and other magical abilities, such as thorn whip and the eldritch invocation Grasp of Hadar, move opponents closer to, or farther from the caster, but do not mention the possibility of knocking the opponent prone.

I can imagine a reasonable explanation for why/how there are two versions: the physical is a crashing, concussive impact, while the magical is perhaps more like a tractor beam or magnetic attraction or repulsion and–possibly–not as abrupt.

But if there are two versions, does that lead to further issues?

Perhaps it’s a separate question, but I ask here to highlight why/how answers to my initial question might matter:

Is the telekinetic (magic) version of a shove something that could reasonably be a surprise to an opponent–would/should that give some disadvantage on the opponent’s chance to resist being shoved?

If an opponent were magically shoved from behind, when they didn’t think anyone was there, would that be a reasonable basis for giving advantage to anyone attacking them from the front?

I’d appreciate any thoughtful input on this–whether directly answering the initial question or just focusing on other aspects. I want to understand how ‘shove’ can be used and haven’t seen much online that explores the topic. Of course each DM could rule as they see fit, and talking about this ahead of time to flesh out some aspects of the spell would be wise (I just emailed my DM to do so), but I’m glad for any input here, as well.

How do you resolve the damage and effects of Eldritch Claw Tattoo’s “Eldritch Maul” ability on a hit that is beyond your weapon’s normal melee range?

The Eldritch Maul ability says:

each of your melee attacks with a weapon or an unarmed strike can reach a target up to 15 feet away from you, as inky tendrils launch toward the target. In addition, your melee attacks deal an extra 1d6 force damage on a hit.

So, let’s say that I’m using the Eldritch Maul ability with a normal shortsword to melee attack a target that is 15 feet away. Is it only the inky tendrils that hit the target, dealing just 1d6 force damage, or should I also factor in the 1d6+STR/DEX piercing damage of the shortsword as if it hit the target as well?

Follow-up question: If the weapon was magical, would its magical properties factor into the attack?

For example: Would your attack with the Eldritch Maul ability benefit from a +1 weapon?

In another example: Would a Dagger of Venom’s poison property proc on a melee hit from 15 feet away while using the Eldritch Maul ability?

Dagger of Venom says:

You can use an action to cause thick, black poison to coat the blade. The poison remains for 1 minute or until an attack using this weapon hits a creature.

What planes have time warping effects?

In the 5e DMG travel to the Feywild is accompanied by a time warping effect, which is determined by rolling on a random table.

My wizard (semi-inspired by an ancient ball of fun from Critical Role) is looking at making a planar home for himself to take advantage of this kind of effect.

I haven’t found anything in 5e, so suspect I will be looking for rules from earlier editions: what planes have stable (ie: not rolled on a random table) time warping effects?

Specifically I am looking for a plane on which I can spend a long time, then step back into the material plane where a shorter time will have passed, even more specifically I am looking for one without negative side effects! Yes this is a classic ‘how can my wizard extend their life’ question.

So far everything I have found either has a side effect, is randomly rolled, or is the far realm (according to the 3.5 manual of the planes, and even that isn’t clear about no negative effects upon returning, but might have to do for my purposes).

Are Heightened effects of spells optional?

Most Heighten effects are purely beneficial, but some significantly alter the effect of a spell. There is an edge case where you may want to use a high level spell slot but get the effect unaltered. The most obvious instance of this, to me, is Invisibility

Duration 10 minutes
Cloaked in illusion, the target becomes invisible. This makes it undetected to all creatures, though the creatures can attempt to find the target, making it hidden to them instead. If the target uses a hostile action, the spell ends after that hostile action is completed.
Heightened (4th) The spell lasts 1 minute, but it doesn’t end if the target uses a hostile action.

A hypothetical, to illustrate, would be attempting to bypass a Dispel trap or otherwise expecting the Invisibility to be Counteracted while still wanting the 10 minute duration. Could I cast Invisibility using a 4th+ spell slot and still maintain the normal Duration and benefits/limitation of the spell?