Does the Faerie Fire spell give advantage on attacks against invisible creatures?

The description of the faerie fire spell states:

Any attack roll against an affected creature or object has advantage if the attacker can see it, and the affected creature or object can’t benefit from being invisible.

As I read it, there are two ways to interpret this. The first is that being held unseen is a benefit of being invisible, and therefore the spell removes that benefit. Since the invisible creature is then visible, you have advantage against it.

The other interpretation is that the order of the sentence matters; first, check if you can see them, and you have advantage if you can. Then, strip them of the benefits of invisibility. In this case, you would have a regular attack roll against the creature, without disadvantage from being invisible nor advantage from Faerie Fire.

What interpretation of the rule aligns with the intention of the faerie fire spell?

When casting Faerie Fire from Ring of Shooting Stars, do you need to maintain concentration? [duplicate]

Ring of Shooting Stars says

Faerie Fire: You can expend 1 charge as an action to cast Faerie Fire from the ring.

Since it says you cast the spell from the ring, I wonder if you need to maintain concentration on the resulting spell. Moreover, is that something particular to Ring of Shooting Stars, or is that how it usually goes with casting spells via items?

Do I get to choose spells for a Faerie Dragon Familiar?

The Faerie Dragon bestiary entry is unusual among monsters eligible to be Improved Familiars. Notably, it’s unusual because unlike all of the other available options, the Faerie Dragon has a list of Spells in addition to it’s Spell-Like Ability.

Specifically, the Faerie Dragon is explicitly called out as casting spells as a 3rd-level sorcerer.

To me, this implies that the Faerie Dragon’s list of spells known is capable of being determined at the time of ‘creation’, and isn’t fixed across all creatures of the type. Thus, if I wanted my Faerie Dragon Familiar to know Color Spray instead of Grease, or Detect Magic instead of Open/Close, that ought to be possible.

However, I fear that my interpretation might be more permissive than is intended, and that the spell list ought to be fixed to those listed in the bestiary.

Either way, it seems very clear that this spell casting does not scale with hit dice/character level as most SLA’s do. That said, I also find myself wondering how this affects the Faerie Dragon’s access to magic items. Can it use Wands and Scrolls as a 3rd level sorcerer (i.e. without a UMD check if the spell is on the proper list)? Could it use a Page of Spell Knowledge to learn an additional spell?

Can level 3 Faerie Fire be seen in Magical Darkness?

Darkness reads:

Magical darkness spreads from a point you choose within range to fill a 15-foot radius sphere for the duration… nonmagical light can’t illuminate it… If any of this spell’s area overlaps with an area of light created by a spell of 2nd level or lower, the spell that created the light is dispelled.

Faerie Fire read:

Each object in a 20-foot cube within range is outlined in blue, green, or violet light (your choice). Any creature in the area when the spell is cast is also outlined in light if it fails a Dexterity saving throw. For the duration, objects and affected creatures shed dim light in a 10-foot radius.

Given this, casting Faerie Fire using a spell slot greater than 3 inside magical darkness should work. What exactly would the effects be on a creature inside the darkness and Faerie Fire who failed their saving roll?

Specifically who would get advantage, disadvantage, or be rolling normal (due to cancelation of advantage and disadvantage), in the case of an attacker in the darkness, another outside, and the original creature?

Magical Darkness versus Faerie Fire

While playing Dnd 5e tonight, I had a small party of players in a room with Darklings in which Darkness had been cast in two locations in the room. It was very dark and the players initially were getting pummeled by the Darklings. The reason Darkness had been cast in the room was because Darklings are at a disadvantage in brighter environments; Darklings are at an advantage when the environment is dark.

Here’s my question.

The Player characters first cast the level 1 Light spell to try to brighten up the room. The Darkness spell is a level 2 Evocation spell cast by Wizards, Sorcerers, or Warlocks and according to the Darkness spell’s specifications:

“If this spell’s area overlaps with an area of light created by a spell of 2nd level or lower, the spell that created the light is dispelled.”

Therefore, nothing happened when they cast the little level1 light spell at the Darkness. At a loss, the Player characters then cast the level 1 Evocation spell called Faerie Fire, hoping to cause the Darklings nearby to dimly glow violet.

Since the Faerie Fire spell would’ve been adding a form of light, and since it’s the same type of spell that Darkness is (Evocation), but since it’s a level lower than Darkness, my inclination was to say Faerie Fire was dispelled the same way the light spell was.

However, I can see a reasonable explanation behind allowing Faerie Fire to work in magical Darkness, since Faerie Fire is not actually a light spell.

And…… that’s where we ended things for the night because, fortunately, we were playing online – the virus – and our link abruptly ended. When it ended, the bard who cast Faerie Fire said he was going to quit for the night.

So that’s the question: Is Faerie Fire dispelled immediately if it’s cast into magical Darkness?

For the Ring of Shooting Stars, what is the spell save DC of Faerie Fire?

The Ring of Shooting Stars has the following feature:

Faerie Fire. You can expend 1 charge as an action to cast faerie fire from the ring.

Since it does not specifically state that you use your spell save DC or list a spell save DC (unlike its Ball Lightning or Shooting Stars features), what is its spell save DC?

Is this homebrew “Faerie Fire Grenade” unbalanced?

I am playing a druid in my friend’s Waterdeep: Dragon Heist campaign. He is allowing me to do some things with exotic plants that I found in the wilds. One of those plants was one that shed a yellow dim-light, which was found beneath the sea.

So, I asked him if it was possible to make some sort of grenade that exploded using some sort of glue along with the powder of this plant, simulating an effect of the spell “Faerie Fire”.

At first we both found it interesting and he allowed me go ahead and make it. The mechanics of the Grenade is as follows:

  • The Grenade can be thrown up to 30 feet away;
  • When it explodes, the grenade releases a sticky powder in a 20-foot cube;
  • Any creature in the area that fails the Dex saving throw is outlined with yellow light, and is subjected to the same effects imposed by the “Faerie Fire” spell.

The DC of the grenade depends on how well I roll in the tool check to craft it, but it’s up to 15, with the ones I crafted having 12 and 13.

But after a while I pondered about the pros and cons of that grenade in comparison to the spell, which sums up as follows:

Cons

  • The grenade has a lower DC than if I cast the spell (my spell save DC is 14)

Pros

  • A non caster can use the grenade and get the same effect
  • The party doesn’t spend a spell slot
  • It doesn’t require concentration

Now, regarding the fact that we save a spell slot and it doesn’t require concentration on it, I start to think that the grenade, besides having a lower DC, is strong. I wouldn’t say it’s game breaking, since I’m not mass producing it (I don’t have interest in doing that and the DM won’t allow it), but is still strong.

But there are others similar consumable items that also simulate the effects of spells without spending spell slots or requiring concentration.

Is this item really unbalanced in comparison with other similar consumable items? If it is unbalanced, how can I balance it? Are there any effects (positive or negative) of this item that I’m not taking into account?

The Grenade doesn’t have a gold cost to craft, since I’m allowed to make it by harvesting the plant, which I grew with Druidcraft, and, for now, the cost of the component for the explosive and glue have been ignored. The only limitation that is applied is time, since I have to growth the plants.


For reference, I took a look at the Dust of Disappearance, which is an uncommon magic item, that, at some extent, simulates the Invisibility spell, and took the following notes about dust of disappearance:

Cons

  • While the spell have a duration of 1 hour, the dust duration is up to 2d4 minutes.

Pros

  • It turn all creatures within 10 feet of you invisible (up to 13 creatures), while the spell turn only one.

The pros of our grenade also applies to this item as well.

Is this “Faerie Fire Grenade” unbalanced?

I have a druid in my friends Dragon Heist campaign and he is allowing me to do some things with exotic plants that I found in the wilds. One of those plants was one that shed a yellow dim-light, which was found beneath the sea.

So, I asked him if it was possible to make some sort of grenade that exploded using some sort of glue along with the powder of this plant, simulating an effect of the spell “Faerie Fire”.

At first we both found it interesting and he allowed me go ahead and make it. I ended up with a grenade that has a DC 12, with the same range of the spell.

But after a while I pondered about the pros and cons of that grenade, which sums up as follows:

Cons

  1. The grenade has a lower DC than if I cast the spell (my spell save DC is 14)

Pros

  1. A non caster can use the grenade and get the same effect
  2. The party doesn’t spend a spell slot
  3. It doesn’t require concentration

Now, regarding the fact that we save a spell slot and it doesn’t require concentration on it, I start to think that the grenade, besides having a lower DC, is really strong. I wouldn’t say it’s game breaking, since I’m not mass producing it (I don’t have interest in doing that and the DM won’t allow it), but is still strong.

My question is: It’s really unbalanced? Are there some other pros or cons about it?

Sidenote: Does you guys have any suggestion to balance it? Like some limitations that still allow it to be interesting, but also maintain the balance with the game.

How do the Faerie Fire and Mirror Image spells interact?

During a discussion on how mirror image interacts with area of effect spells, and particularly with magic missile, the question arose about how faerie fire interacts with mirror image. This is related to the general question of how mirror image interacts with spells that don’t have an attack roll but is more specific.

The faerie fire spell description states:

Each object in a 20-foot cube within range is outlined in blue, green, or violet light (your choice). Any creature in the area when the spell is cast is also outlined in light if it fails a Dexterity saving throw. For the duration, objects and affected creatures shed dim light in a 10-foot radius.

Any attack roll against an affected creature or object has advantage if the attacker can see it, and the affected creature or object can’t benefit from being invisible.

The description of mirror image says:

Three illusory duplicates of yourself appear in your space. Until the spell ends, the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions, shifting position so it’s impossible to track which image is real. You can use your action to dismiss the illusory duplicates.

Each time a creature targets you with an attack during the spell’s duration, roll a d20 to determine whether the attack instead targets one of your duplicates.

If you have three duplicates, you must roll a 6 or higher to change the attack’s target to a duplicate. With two duplicates, you must roll an 8 or higher. With one duplicate, you must roll an 11 or higher.

A duplicate’s AC equals 10 + your Dexterity modifier. If an attack hits a duplicate, the duplicate is destroyed. A duplicate can be destroyed only by an attack that hits it. It ignores all other damage and effects. The spell ends when all three duplicates are destroyed.

Does faerie fire only light up the creature who cast mirror image, or do all of the illusory duplicates also get outlined/lit up by faerie fire?

Our guess was that faerie fire lights up all of the images, but since faerie fire is working like an AoE spell, and AoE spells aren’t fooled by the images (fireball, etc), perhaps we misunderstood how these two spells interact.