In Ghost Ops do NPCs get free attacks only on total Bullet Time failure or also on partial failure?

I have the original version of Ghost Ops (which uses Fudge dice), not the Savage Worlds version or the OSR version. This question is about that original version, but if you think the rules in one of the other versions can throw some light on this, please chip in.

On page 132 of the core rulebook there is an example of a failed Bullet Time action. The PC was attempting to shoot 3 NPCs in the head, and needed an 8 but only got a 6.

The book then has some more rules:

The Handler can decide that the Operator succeeded in some of the attempt. Maybe they barged the door and managed to get 2 of the attempted headshots off but missed the third. Failing a Bullet Time event places the Operator as prone for 1 round, allowing any Tangos free attacks. Deciding to attempt Bullet Time is risky but can be ultimately rewarding.

So, if the GM has said the failed roll can be partial success (hit 2 of the NPCs) and partial failure (miss the 3rd NPC), which of these applies?

  1. It still counts as a normal fail – the PC is prone and subject to a free attack by all three NPCs (assuming the two he shot aren’t dead or disabled).
  2. It still counts as a ‘reduced’ fail – the PC is prone but only the third NPC, who was not hit, gets a free attack.
  3. It counts as a success – the PC is not prone and the NPC/s don’t get free attacks.
  4. The GM decides on a case by case basis.

I’m hoping there is clarification for this question in one of the expansions, or in an updated version of the pdf (I only have a print copy). I’ve failed to find any errata on the internet.

Is Power Failure an Environmental or Structural Threat?

According to the CySA SYBEX book, in chapter 1, power failures are listed as both environmental threats and structural threats… but which one is it?

According to the book:

Environment threats occur when natural or man-made disasters occur that are outside the control of the organization. These might include fires, flooding, severe storms, power failures, or widespread telecommunications disruptions.

At the same time,

Structural threats occur when equipment, software, or environmental controls fail due to … environmental controls (such as power and cooling infrastructure) …

Total catastrophic failure, or should a GM ever allow re-rolls and do-overs?

It’s a critical moment in the game at the end of a marathon session, everyone is on the edge of their seats, and the player rolls… a 1. Evil bad guy wins, party dies, game over. As a GM, what should you do? Probably don’t structure your game to hinge on the result of a single roll, right? Well what if it was an improbable-but-possible series of bad rolls?

Should you ever let people re-roll after failing? I’m thinking no, otherwise everybody will want to re-roll after every bad outcome.

What about letting the party start over from when they first entered the room? Just for the sake of convenience and without any sort of time reversal game mechanic.

Potential Example of an algorithm failure

I was looking an algorithm to solve a problem of finding whether and array contains a quadruple with sum = k,(k is input) mentioned at GeeksforGeeks. In one solution the approach mentioned is below,which i think i not correct:

  1. Store all possible two elements pairs of array in some another auxiliary array and also store i,j indices of the elements.There will be $ C(n,2)$ pairs.
  2. Sort the auxiliary array.
  3. Take two pointers,left=0 and right=n-1 to auxiliary array.

3.1. If auxiliary[left]+auxiliary[right]==k and there is no common index in elements represented by left and right, we return true.

3.2 else If auxiliary[left]+auxiliary[right]<k, we do left++

3.3 else we do right– 3.4 And this goes in continues loop until left<right or we get element at 3.1

Now my doubt is that in case sum of left and right elements=k and there is some common element between left and right,then this algo will do right–. I want to understand that why we do right– here and no left++ and the other way.I think there must be some example where this scenario will make algorithm fail but i am not able to produce that.Can some tell that whether it will indeed fail or prove that it is always correct?

How can I handle critical failure without slowing down the action?

In my last session, my group had in a single encounter over 8 botches, I lost count in fact!

At first, I was statistically amazed at how our ranger botched 4 rounds in a row (in-game interpretation would equal to a birth-deficient kobold with cataracts trying to throw a rock point-blank at a boulder and missing), but then it became agitating coming up with ideas on how to “punish” a botch.

Normally our DM says: “On 1 your bow string snaps, on 2 your arrow hits the fighter adjacent to the enemy, on 3… blah blah blah” and rolls 1d4 to determine the outcome, which in my opinion slows down the fight and does not add to the role-playing experience at all, not to mention each class requires different actions, while AoE attacks can critical hit one target but botch on another… However, I feel critical failure should exist as a means of balancing natural 20 and making multiple attacks during a turn more risky. Being under constant life-threatening stress, even a master would make a mistake, or grow reluctant not knowing his enemies’ traits.

All of the above led to one rational question: how can I introduce critical failure in a way that doesn’t slow down the action?

Loading scripts and stylesheets together failure

I’m trying to load scripts and stylesheets together at same function. At first I loaded stylesheet by itself and it worked after I added admin_enqueue_scripts function in additional to wp_enqueue_scripts.

Now I’m trying to load stylesheets and scripts in the same function, unfortunately that fails to exist, and also prevent CSS to load.

I can’t find any typo’s or something online that related to my issue.

  function loadAssets(){       wp_enqueue_style( 'style', get_template_directory_uri() . '/css/style.css');       wp_enqueue_script('jquery', get_template_directory_uri() . '/js/jquery.js');       wp_enqueue_script('script', get_template_directory_uri() . '/js/script.js');   }    //Applying those loading references   add_action('wp_enqueue_scripts', 'loadAssets');   add_action('admin_enqueue_scripts', 'loadAssets'); 

How can I load both JavaScript files and CSS files on the same function?

TLS 1.2 Handshake Failure

I am having an issue with Windows IIS server and TLS 1.2 handshake. Windows sent Encrypted Handshake Message and the Client sent Encrypted Alert then both sides reset the connection as shown in the picture. I’d like to understand what causes the Encrypted Alert as more data is expected to be sent. Please help 🙂

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Proxy Error, DNS lookup failure for -SOS-

Hello, everyone,

please I need your professional help

I have built a new page (3 months old), and because my page speed was too low, I wanted to perform this. But I made a big mistake! I came across a platform called "Ezoic.com" and followed their instructions and changed my server entries in my DNS provider. And that was the lockdown. My website is no longer accessible, neither on the domain name nor on wp-admin. I don't know what to do anymore. I restored the settings on my server, but…

Proxy Error, DNS lookup failure for -SOS-

Is a critical failure on a natural 1 a rule or house rule?

There’s a question about this relating to 3.5e, but I couldn’t find one for 5e.

According to RAW, is a natural 1 a critical failure? And if so, under what scenarios does it apply, and what is the expected result?

One of my players is dissatisfied with my calls relating to 1’s* but I don’t have my books handy and I’m having trouble figuring out if the whole shebang is a very popular houserule or actually in RAW.

*I have a feeling that I am likely in the wrong here and it’s more of a same-page issue than a mechanics one, but I want to check what the book’s ruling is before we sit down to have a conversation about it. Our table dynamics aren’t the question here; I just need to know the mechanics to make an informed decision.